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I have just spent a long time (yawn) selecting keywords for some new images and was wondering if there is an easier way to select them.

I use the microstock keyword tool but cannot always find the required words or phrases!

Was just wondering if there is a way to create a list to choose from, i.e. with a click!

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IMO your own brain is going to be your best friend for quite a while to come.

I've lost count of the number of times a poor keyworder has whined, "But I'm using X (or Y or Z) keyword tool."

 

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I believe there's nothing better than the human brain to choose keywords, as much as I hate to say it.  I despise keywording, but I know it's a necessary evil.

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I just meant physically selecting the words from a list, ..............not intending to diss-engage my brain quite yet!

 

I am off to give my brain a rest now! ;)

 

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In AIM, you can't create a list. But in adobe bridge you can create lists for keywords. Once keywords are added, you can upload to AIM and the keywords will be added automatically.  Not sure if you are using lightroom or bridge as it should be able to create lists from there.

 

Hai

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Someone here suggested Templates in Bridge; can't remember who, but I'd like to thank them, as I've just started using them and have found them useful, when I have batches of files. For example recently I was on safari, and have a template for description with "    in Kruger NP, South Africa" and keywords: "wild; Kruger National Park; South Africa; Africa; African; African wildlife; African nature; nature; wildlife; safari"  

Then once I had sorted all the photos into species folders, I could then choose all the files in one folder and put the species names, alternates, and scientific names into the description and keywords and add these and e.g. antelope, mammal, animal, wild animal, African animal to the keywords.

After that, it's pretty easy to just add specifics for the individual files I select to upload.

 

Of course, depending on what you shoot, that may not work well, and maybe the keyword hierarchy would work better for you.

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Posted (edited)

I have started using a few 'Keyword Clusters' which I have saved in a Pages file ready to cut and paste:

 

eg)

 

Church

church, churchyard, graves, gravestones, graveyard, parish, village, historic, building, buildings, architecture, settlement, tower/spire, 


Prehistory

prehistory, prehistoric, pre-history, pre-historic, history, historic, ancient, Stone Age, Neolithic, archaeological, archaeology, archeology,  archeological, site, sites,  

 

Wiltshire

UK, United Kingdom, Britain, British, England, English, Wiltshire, west country, Wessex, countryside, rural, rural area, 

Edited by geogphotos

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3 minutes ago, geogphotos said:

I have started using a few 'Keyword Clusters' which I have saved in a Pages file ready to cut and paste:

 

 

I presume that you then just copy and paste the "Keyword clusters" into the metadata in the image in LR or PS? I use Keyword Sets in LR for subjects whenever possible which gives me 9 keywords to start with. I can always have another set for the same subject if I have more than 9 regular keywords that I use.

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Posted (edited)
49 minutes ago, David McGill said:

I presume that you then just copy and paste the "Keyword clusters" into the metadata in the image in LR or PS? I use Keyword Sets in LR for subjects whenever possible which gives me 9 keywords to start with. I can always have another set for the same subject if I have more than 9 regular keywords that I use.

 

Exactly, so for a prehistoric site in Wiltshire I cut and paste those bottom two as a starter. Next, write the caption, then add to the keywords as appropriate. I do it in Photoshelter and then ftp to Alamy. I don't use Lightroom at all for anything.

 

If nothing else I find it easier than starting off with a completely blank keyword area - and how many times have I typed the same damn keywords???

Edited by geogphotos

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Posted (edited)

I feel a detailed discripition is the best place to start keywording. I use a word processor for the spell checker, thesaurus and synonym. With the description I try to answer the 5Ws who, what, where, when and why. After a detailed discripition is completed I copy it then add commas between keywords/tags as I do this I add and expand relevant keywords, plurals, variations, spellings.

 

Think of the discripition as the skeleton that additional keywords/tags flesh out. 

 

I then copy the discripition and keywords/tags into the metadata of the RAW file using Adobe Bridge.

Edited by dlmphotog

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Cryptoprocta said:

Then once I had sorted all the photos into species folders, I could then choose all the files in one folder and put the species names, alternates, and scientific names into the description and keywords and add these and e.g. antelope, mammal, animal, wild animal, African animal to the keywords.

After that, it's pretty easy to just add specifics for the individual files I select to upload.

 

Of course, depending on what you shoot, that may not work well, and maybe the keyword hierarchy would work better for you.

I have question from this as I've asked about keywording before and have been given suggestions on adding scientific names. How do you know the scientific names or even common names if people, like me, are not professionals? Where could I find them out?Maybe with animal it's a bit easier but with random plants I certainly find it hard...I have totally not idea which plant it could be, other than the general idea for example "it's a tree".

Edited by Shelybear

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26 minutes ago, Shelybear said:

I have question from this as I've asked about keywording before and have been given suggestions on adding scientific names. How do you know the scientific names or even common names if people, like me, are not professionals? Where could I find them out?Maybe with animal it's a bit easier but with random plants I certainly find it hard...I have totally not idea which plant it could be, other than the general idea for example "it's a tree".

Hi Shelybear

Usually, I go to Wikipedia for the scientific name.

For example, aster flowers

Aster is a genus of flowering plants in the family Asteraceae ...

Wikipedia is also a good source for keywords

Rick

 

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On 3/11/2018 at 23:35, David Davies said:

I just meant physically selecting the words from a list, ..............not intending to diss-engage my brain quite yet!

 

I am off to give my brain a rest now! ;)

 

I usually find I can copy quite a few tags from similar images. Scroll down and find the relevant previous sub, crtl-click to select both, then select the relevant images and make the tags common. I name my subs to make this easier, but it's a bit tedious if you have to go back more than a year or two.

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Posted (edited)
On 11/03/2018 at 22:43, David Davies said:

 

Was just wondering if there is a way to create a list to choose from, i.e. with a click!

 

In Lightroom you can use a Preset to inject a series of keywords into the IPTC content that will be copied over to Alamy AIM. It is useful to set up presets for commonly encountered places, situations, seasons etc. It doesn't absolve you from having to keyword, but it certainly removes some of the drudgery.

 

The trick is to learn to enjoy keywording, the research element in particular can be fun, but the whole thing is an interesting exercise.

 

Or just think in terms of $$$ when you need encouragement ;)

Edited by Bryan
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I just use meta data templates that I build and store in Photoshop. I enter titles, copyright info, and keywords into the templates and store them in categorized folders. It is great when I have recurring subjects or themes, which I do quite often.

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3 hours ago, Martin B said:

I just use meta data templates that I build and store in Photoshop. I enter titles, copyright info, and keywords into the templates and store them in categorized folders. It is great when I have recurring subjects or themes, which I do quite often.

Templates are a lifesaver. The first time I tag a subject, I do it in Bridge. Scientific name, etc. Then once done, go to “Create template”. Here you can remove specific tags like eating, perching, flying, etc to achieve a generic set. I always have the location in detail. So nice not to have to type that each and every time. Or look up the scientific name again. Title the template. It will, in future, be found alphabetically.

When I shoot that subject again, I go to “apply template”. Add a few more tags specific to that image (eating a worm) (feeding baby) (gathering food) (crabapple tree) and I’m done. Life SAVER!

Betty

 

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Thanks Bryan, Martin and Betty, that's what I was looking for!

Thanks also to everyone for your help, keywording should be quicker and easier in the future! :)

 

David Davies

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