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Michael Ventura

Some Stunning Landscape Photography of Iceland!

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An amazing location indeed and a great set of images. Unfortunately there is some over-the-top PP on several images. I don't think a rainbow like that has ever existed in the real world. Don't know how I managed to miss out on a stop in Iceland myself; It would have been fairly easy to fit it in going back and forth between the States and Europe. 

 

When I interviewed Pete Turner for the Nikon Image Book he talked a lot about going up there to cover a volcanic eruption. 

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Yes, agreed about some being over processed and one that had these strange star streaks.

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Aaaaagh!

 

Anyone who knows a smidgin about meteorology or astronomy can tell you that the two featuring the conical mountain, one with bizarre star trails and the other with a double rainbow, are fakes.

 

And many of the others have had the sh*t Photoshopped out of them.

 

Ghastly. (Runs off and hides under the sofa.)

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Photoshopped to the point that the images are a cross between photography and illustration.

 

What is wrong with that? They break out of the mind handcuffs imposed by realistic landscape photography, and yet are more beautiful and real than any illustration.

 

I see it as the way the artist, using a camera, saw the scene in their minds eye.

 

On the commercial side, this is the type of image treatment that attracts the big advertising dollars.

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Yeah, I think that puffin snap was taken in the Bronx Zoo. And there are numbers of images that were greatly overdone in PP. None of that distracts from the stark beauty of rural Iceland. It's breathtaking. 

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I've only seen Iceland from the window of a plane on the tarmac of Reykjavik airport. (refuelling) It looked nothing like these images.  :rolleyes: If it had I'd have wondered what exotic spices had been added to my hash browns. Needless to say I'm not a fan of these.

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I could take these shots...if I had the strength, stamina and agility to hike/climb to these locales (and a large travel budget). :)

 

Edit: And they are a bit heavy in the PP.

Edited by Lynn Palmer

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Aaaaagh!

 

Anyone who knows a smidgin about meteorology or astronomy can tell you that the two featuring the conical mountain, one with bizarre star trails and the other with a double rainbow, are fakes.

 

And many of the others have had the sh*t Photoshopped out of them.

 

Ghastly. (Runs off and hides under the sofa.)

I'm no expert but those aren't supposed to be star trails, they look like a meteor shower as the streaks are straight and appear to be all heading the same straight route, star trails always form an arc around the pole star (well in the northern hemisphere they do). Oh and double rainbows do happen, i've seen them.

 

Love these pictures.

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Aaaaagh!

 

Anyone who knows a smidgin about meteorology or astronomy can tell you that the two featuring the conical mountain, one with bizarre star trails and the other with a double rainbow, are fakes.

 

And many of the others have had the sh*t Photoshopped out of them.

 

Ghastly. (Runs off and hides under the sofa.)

I'm no expert but those aren't supposed to be star trails, they look like a meteor shower as the streaks are straight and appear to be all heading the same straight route, star trails always form an arc around the pole star (well in the northern hemisphere they do). Oh and double rainbows do happen, i've seen them.

 

Love these pictures.

 

 

The photographer explains underneath his image how it was taken and how the streaks came to be: by mistake he had touched his zoom ring.

When he tried this on purpose after that, the effect was not as good.

 

wim

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Aaaaagh!

 

Anyone who knows a smidgin about meteorology or astronomy can tell you that the two featuring the conical mountain, one with bizarre star trails and the other with a double rainbow, are fakes.

 

And many of the others have had the sh*t Photoshopped out of them.

 

Ghastly. (Runs off and hides under the sofa.)

I'm no expert but those aren't supposed to be star trails, they look like a meteor shower as the streaks are straight and appear to be all heading the same straight route, star trails always form an arc around the pole star (well in the northern hemisphere they do). Oh and double rainbows do happen, i've seen them.

 

Love these pictures.

 

 

The photographer explains underneath his image how it was taken and how the streaks came to be: by mistake he had touched his zoom ring.

When he tried this on purpose after that, the effect was not as good.

 

wim

 

Thanks, maybe i need glasses too, as I can't see any explanations under the pictures on my netbook, but shouldn't all the stars in the image be streaking if the zoom was used?, just like in startrail images they should all streak more or less, So perhaps it's a composite image of the landscape, Arroura, zoomed stars, and unzoomed starscape.

 

Still looks great though :)

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Photoshopped to the point that the images are a cross between photography and illustration.
 
What is wrong with that? They break out of the mind handcuffs imposed by realistic landscape photography, and yet are more beautiful and real than any illustration.

 

 

What's wrong with it? When I show this photograph to people I often get a knowing wink and (in a sort of 'gotcha¨' tone) ... "Ah-ha!Photoshopped!"

 

Castle-on-the-lake-AA963M.jpg

 

Well ... actually ... no. It isn't. A tweak on the saturation and vibrance because it was shot in RAW. Removal of dust spots. That's about it. This was the result of quite a bit of time with astronomical ephemeris, weather forecasts, a preliminary visit with a compass, a couple of subsequent dud visits, and a load of luck.

 

Not everyone will agree, and maybe I'm too old-fashioned, but I believe that presenting heavily Photoshopped images as 'photography' devalues photography.

 

If you like those sort of heavily processed images, fine. But call them something else. Computer-assisted art?

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Aaaaagh!

 

Anyone who knows a smidgin about meteorology or astronomy can tell you that the two featuring the conical mountain, one with bizarre star trails and the other with a double rainbow, are fakes.

 

And many of the others have had the sh*t Photoshopped out of them.

 

Ghastly. (Runs off and hides under the sofa.)

I'm no expert but those aren't supposed to be star trails, they look like a meteor shower as the streaks are straight and appear to be all heading the same straight route, star trails always form an arc around the pole star (well in the northern hemisphere they do). Oh and double rainbows do happen, i've seen them.

 

Love these pictures.

 

 

The photographer explains underneath his image how it was taken and how the streaks came to be: by mistake he had touched his zoom ring.

When he tried this on purpose after that, the effect was not as good.

 

wim

 

Thanks, maybe i need glasses too, as I can't see any explanations under the pictures on my netbook, but shouldn't all the stars in the image be streaking if the zoom was used?, just like in startrail images they should all streak more or less, So perhaps it's a composite image of the landscape, Arroura, zoomed stars, and unzoomed starscape.

 

Still looks great though :)

 

 

The image credit is a link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/coolbiere/11003063433/sizes/l

On the photo's main page (I don't understand Flickr): https://www.flickr.com/photos/coolbiere/11003063433 are the comments.

 

A question:

Amazing shot. How did you manage to get the straight trails on some stars while keeping others sharp?

 

The photographer CoolBieRe anwers:

actually i accidentally rotate my zoom ring while shooting on the first shot

it turned out to be like that

after that shot, i've tried couples more but seems mountain and foregrounds 're all blur

 

On the Demilked page, there are comments also about the photoshopped nature of the uhh Icelandic nature.

At this moment the last comment is:

Trust me, most of these photographs are not photoshopped, I'm from Iceland and I've taken pictures of landscapes with just an ordinary digital camera and some would come out looking just as sorreal as most of the pictures you see here.

 

It's all about frame of reference isn't it. When I'm in Miami I think the whole city of Miami is photoshopped.

 

wim

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Aaaaagh!

 

Anyone who knows a smidgin about meteorology or astronomy can tell you that the two featuring the conical mountain, one with bizarre star trails and the other with a double rainbow, are fakes.

 

And many of the others have had the sh*t Photoshopped out of them.

 

Ghastly. (Runs off and hides under the sofa.)

I'm no expert but those aren't supposed to be star trails, they look like a meteor shower as the streaks are straight and appear to be all heading the same straight route, star trails always form an arc around the pole star (well in the northern hemisphere they do). Oh and double rainbows do happen, i've seen them.

 

Love these pictures.

 

 

The photographer explains underneath his image how it was taken and how the streaks came to be: by mistake he had touched his zoom ring.

When he tried this on purpose after that, the effect was not as good.

 

wim

 

Thanks, maybe i need glasses too, as I can't see any explanations under the pictures on my netbook, but shouldn't all the stars in the image be streaking if the zoom was used?, just like in startrail images they should all streak more or less, So perhaps it's a composite image of the landscape, Arroura, zoomed stars, and unzoomed starscape.

 

Still looks great though :)

 

 

The image credit is a link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/coolbiere/11003063433/sizes/l

On the photo's main page (I don't understand Flickr): https://www.flickr.com/photos/coolbiere/11003063433 are the comments.

 

A question:

Amazing shot. How did you manage to get the straight trails on some stars while keeping others sharp?

 

The photographer CoolBieRe anwers:

actually i accidentally rotate my zoom ring while shooting on the first shot

it turned out to be like that

after that shot, i've tried couples more but seems mountain and foregrounds 're all blur

 

On the Demilked page, there are comments also about the photoshopped nature of the uhh Icelandic nature.

At this moment the last comment is:

Trust me, most of these photographs are not photoshopped, I'm from Iceland and I've taken pictures of landscapes with just an ordinary digital camera and some would come out looking just as sorreal as most of the pictures you see here.

 

It's all about frame of reference isn't it. When I'm in Miami I think the whole city of Miami is photoshopped.

 

wim

 

Thanks for the links and the explanation Wim, now thats a very valid explanation I can agree with.

So from his answer and his camera data I can deduce that the stars that made the long straight streaks were the only stars bright enough to be recorded by the sensor during the zooming movement and all the other stars were too faint to be picked up by the sensor in the time it took to make the zooming movement, but were recorded during the rest of the 30 second exposure.

Cheers.

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Thanks for the links and the explanation Wim, now thats a very valid explanation I can agree with.

 

So from his answer and his camera data I can deduce that the stars that made the long straight streaks were the only stars bright enough to be recorded by the sensor during the zooming movement and all the other stars were too faint to be picked up by the sensor in the time it took to make the zooming movement, but were recorded during the rest of the 30 second exposure.

Cheers.

 

 

Yes I figured about the same. However what about the lights of the house in the right hand corner?

And the funny double trails on some stars/planets?

In the largest available size, there are some very faint trails visible for some of the other stars as well.

If it really was an accident it's either at the beginning or the end and probably a very short and sharp movement. Is the lens a 14-24? -I have not opened it in Photoshop yet.

He/she has a lot of images on Flickr from Iceland that are more or less like this. Without the zooming effect.

 

wim

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Thanks for the links and the explanation Wim, now thats a very valid explanation I can agree with.

 

So from his answer and his camera data I can deduce that the stars that made the long straight streaks were the only stars bright enough to be recorded by the sensor during the zooming movement and all the other stars were too faint to be picked up by the sensor in the time it took to make the zooming movement, but were recorded during the rest of the 30 second exposure.

Cheers.

 

 

Yes I figured about the same. However what about the lights of the house in the right hand corner?

And the funny double trails on some stars/planets?

In the largest available size, there are some very faint trails visible for some of the other stars as well.

If it really was an accident it's either at the beginning or the end and probably a very short and sharp movement. Is the lens a 14-24? -I have not opened it in Photoshop yet.

He/she has a lot of images on Flickr from Iceland that are more or less like this. Without the zooming effect.

 

wim

 

Yes it's strange that the house lights in the corner didin't streak, and double trails suggest more than one exposure (sometimes see that double effect on stitched pano's when they don't overlap perfectly).  Yes he used that big fat 14-24 at 30sec F2.8 iso 3200.

 

Parm

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I liked looking at them a lot.

 

The only issue I had was the one where the guy looks like he's taking a leak into an erupting volcano. Trust me, that won't put it out.

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All of them beautiful! Thanks for sharing.  I went last year for 4 days......completely grey and overcast and gloomy....however....a much nicer flat light than we get in the UK.

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The Iceland images, photoshopped or not, have got me thinking about my Maui images.

 

There are old lava fields on Maui that I hardly ever photograph. The next time I am on Maui I will move from the beach to the lava fields, and try to apply what I see in the Iceland images.

 

Here is my old approach to a Maui lava field. I was satisfied with this image until I looked at the Iceland images.

 

Capparis_sandwichiana_AKA_Maiapilo_growi

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Iceland seems to be the place to be for landscapers these days. Soon the images will be as rare as anything from a city. It's photoshop that sets the images apart, some go crazy and some leave it subtle. It's usually the overdone ones that end up being editors picks on 500px. Totally surreal environments. Unfortunately for all the effort, most will end up on canvases and sold for £7 a pop in pound stretchers. 

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Am I correct in thinking that the streaked stars are OK because the effect was achieved in camera by zooming the lens, but would be cheating if the identical effect was achieved by using photoshop?

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