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Alistair Scott

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  • Content Count

    21
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12 Forum reputation = neutral

About Alistair Scott

  • Rank
    Forum newbie

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.alistairscott.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Switzerland
  • Interests
    sailing, skiing, hill-walking, dogs (especially Border Collies)

Alamy

  • Alamy URL
    https://www.alamy.com/contrib-browse.asp?cid={F7AE51E4-205B-432F-A1BC-DBF7D49E1B3B}&name=Alistair+Scott
  • Images
    3954
  • Joined Alamy
    12 Nov 2005
  1. There's a very interesting article in Friday's edition of The Guardian - 'The End of Capitalism has Begun'. It's long, but well worth the read. In the middle of it is this paragraph ... "Information goods are freely replicable. Once a thing is made, it can be copied/pasted infinitely. A music track or the giant database you use to build an airliner has a production cost; but its cost of reproduction falls towards zero. Therefore, if the normal price mechanism of capitalism prevails over time, its price will fall towards zero, too." Substitute "A photograph" for "A music track or the giant database you use to build an airliner ..." and what do you get? Something for us photographers to think about?
  2. Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales joins the protest. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jul/03/sharing-photos-freedom-of-panorama The commercial/private aspects of this are not at all clear. But it's yet another restriction on photography in public places and will, doubtless, be seized upon by various officious jobsworths when we're going about our lawful (we hope) business. Sign the petition!
  3. Once again, the freedom to take photographs in public places, and use them as you wish, is under attack. If this Bill goes through the European Parliament, architectural, travel and street photography would be killed stone dead. For example: On the “freedom of panorama” principle, such as the right to create and share images and photographs of public buildings, the text cautions that the commercial use of such reproductions should require authorization from the rightholder. That appears to mean, for example, if you wanted to sell a photo taken on the street you would have to get the permission of the 'rightholder' of every building shown in the image. If you're concerned by this, please sign the petition here in an attempt to stop it.
  4. I got a 'Top 500' eail too, for the second time. Gave me a pleasant boost.
  5. To avoid lugging my Nikon D3 and bag of lenses around everywhere, I use a Canon Powershot G1x. It's not on the approved list, but I've never had problems with my submissions. It shoots RAW at 4352x3264 pixels and has a large sensor for a P&S. I'm guessing that Alamy can't keep up with the constant stream of new models coming out. The G1x has its limitations - appalling close focus abilities and shutter lag are the ones that bug me. But the huge unexpected bonus that I've found is that I'm far less conspicuous when shooting on the hoof. A significant advantage.
  6. Just to bring this up to date ... In a post on the Microstock forum, dated 8th August 2014 Alamy states that they have 37,000+ contributing photographers.
  7. What's wrong with it? When I show this photograph to people I often get a knowing wink and (in a sort of 'gotcha¨' tone) ... "Ah-ha!Photoshopped!" Well ... actually ... no. It isn't. A tweak on the saturation and vibrance because it was shot in RAW. Removal of dust spots. That's about it. This was the result of quite a bit of time with astronomical ephemeris, weather forecasts, a preliminary visit with a compass, a couple of subsequent dud visits, and a load of luck. Not everyone will agree, and maybe I'm too old-fashioned, but I believe that presenting heavily Photoshopped images as 'photography' devalues photography. If you like those sort of heavily processed images, fine. But call them something else. Computer-assisted art?
  8. Aaaaagh! Anyone who knows a smidgin about meteorology or astronomy can tell you that the two featuring the conical mountain, one with bizarre star trails and the other with a double rainbow, are fakes. And many of the others have had the sh*t Photoshopped out of them. Ghastly. (Runs off and hides under the sofa.)
  9. Just as I homed in on one car - while I was playing about with panning, beside a woodland road in dappled sunlight - another car passed it going in the opposite direction. Of course, the second car turned out a total blur. But it gave a great sort of 'explosion' and slight dimming effect behind the subject, which adds to the sense of speed. Serendipity.
  10. Great subject. Having found out how to post images, here are my 3 ...
  11. Sorry to be dense, I'm new to this, I'd like to take part. It's a great way to share our work. But how do you put your images in a post? When I click on the image option on the toolbar it asks me for a URL. Does that mean I have to put the images online somehwre first? Or is there a simpler way? Direct from Alamy?
  12. Thanks. A great tip. I've just found several books that way. But ... am I missing something? ... how do you find which image has been used in the book, and where? All I get is the book covers.
  13. Like death and taxes, dust on your sensor is inevitable. Even if you never take the lens off, if it's a telescopic zoom you're going to be pumping air in and out of the body every time you operate it. Then, having moving parts, the camera is going to generate its own microscopic particles through wear. Don't obsess about it. Here's how I spot and remove every last dust particle - even ones invisible normally - in the sky or other areas of uniform colour, using Photoshop: 1. Duplicate your photo in a second layer (Control J) 2. Select all of the layer you've created (Control A) and erase it 3. Deselect 4. Fill the layer you've created (which is now empty) with pure black using the paint bucket 5. Select 'Overlay'. The sky will now have gone a very dark blue and every last dust spot stands out 6. Make sure you are working in the background layer (the original one) and clone them all out 7. When you've finished, erase the layer filled with black that you created 8. Voilá!
  14. So, averaging out what's been posted so far ... 2006 - $141 (n=3) 2007 - $273 (n=4) 2008 - $131 (n=5) 2009 - $99 (n=5) 2010 - $83 (n=5) 2011 - $62 (n=5) 2012 - $56 (n=5) 2013 - $58 (n=5) Still not a very big sample to be going on, but appears to be a distinct drop in selling value around 2008/2010 (2007 was skewed by two large figures of $475 and $320)
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