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By the way, on Thursday, I sold my first piece of Nikon glass to Adorama here in NYC. I would have liked to have gotten a bit more money, but the amount was fair and it was all quick and painless and the people were more than polite. Also on the plus side, I needed to do no posting of adds in eBay or anywhere, no packing or shipping, and I was able to get rid of my disquieting paranoia. No one at Adorama tried to scam me or rob me.  

 

Edo

 

It's likely I'll be bringing my Nikon D700 up to Adorama tomorrow. This was a true breakthrough camera; I've owned nothing that compares to it in noise control, fabulous. So when I part with that FX body (and I have several other good Nikon DSLRs), there will be no going back.  :(

 

I know it's a hard decision to make.The D700 is a fabulous camera and nothing I've used compares as far as IQ/noise...But it is heavy as are the full frame lenses and it's loud. My 2013 injury has me selling off my DSLR gear for good this time. I look forward to the Sony A7000 next year.From what I read online,Sony has some amazing mirrorless cameras and lenses coming out. I like my photos better when I'm not in pain from lugging a big camera bag!

 

L

 

I can relate to that!  I had to abort a shoot once at a place I'll probably never get to go to again because my bag was so heavy I gasped for breath from the pain.  Not fun.  After that, I got a roller bag.  Which is fine for big open spaces on walks, but doesn't work for trekking across damp, uneven ground and places indoors with tight quarters.  Ummm. It's great for the zoo?  And for boarding planes?  :)

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Will there come a time when press conferences DEMAND silent cameras?

I'm getting my 5d2 back from the workshop next week but have been taking lots of pics with my RX10 and experimenting quite a bit.

I'm happy with it in some respects, but not in others, I love the silence, the lack of weight and the ability to hold it aloft on a monopod and shoot with my phone, but I dislike the electronic manual focus and the electronic zoom amongst other things.

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Will there come a time when press conferences DEMAND silent cameras?

I'm getting my 5d2 back from the workshop next week but have been taking lots of pics with my RX10 and experimenting quite a bit.

I'm happy with it in some respects, but not in others, I love the silence, the lack of weight and the ability to hold it aloft on a monopod and shoot with my phone, but I dislike the electronic manual focus and the electronic zoom amongst other things.

 

It could be a possibility and flash too may become unacceptable, or photography will be restricted to set pieces (after all the event is there for the publicity). I was recently taking photos during live poetry and author readings with my Fuji X-T1 and I was often barely 10ft/3m away but it was not a problem. I used my Canon 1Ds3 once (I needed to use flash) and was embarassed by the noise and it was the only event in about 35 I covered where the audience feedback forms mentioned the photography - it was not just me it was also the guy from the local paper but unlike me he used his motordrive (ouch!).

Edited by Martin P Wilson

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Sorry, John, if I had a whine in my voice . . . it might have been the wine.  :)

 

And I hear you, Betty. I have owned at least two of every kind of gear bag ever to exist. Climbing around, maybe a backpack is the thing. A roller is good in cities or when traveling. But the facts I have to face are (1.) I'm no longer a pro, and (2.) I can't work as hard as I used to. I accept that. 

 

My specific reference to selling my D700 is that the D700 is my only FX body. I have a 20 f/2.8 AF I love, light and sharp and useful. But on a DX camera that's a 30mm . . . all but pointless. I still have a D90, a D60, two D200s and a lot of glass and other stuff. But once the D700 FX goes, that's the end of my long adventure with Nikon. 

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Will there come a time when press conferences DEMAND silent cameras?

I'm getting my 5d2 back from the workshop next week but have been taking lots of pics with my RX10 and experimenting quite a bit.

I'm happy with it in some respects, but not in others, I love the silence, the lack of weight and the ability to hold it aloft on a monopod and shoot with my phone, but I dislike the electronic manual focus and the electronic zoom amongst other things.

 

It could be a possibility and flash too may become unacceptable, or photography will be restricted to set pieces (after all the event is there for the publicity). I was recently taking photos during live poetry and author readings with my Fuji X-T1 and I was often barely 10ft/3m away but it was not a problem. I used my Canon 1Ds3 once (I needed to use flash) and was embarassed by the noise and it was the only event in about 35 I covered where the audience feedback forms mentioned the photography - it was not just me it was also the guy from the local paper but unlike me he used his motordrive (ouch!).

 

 

Silent and mirrorless are not synonymous. My NEX cameras, for instance, while a lot quieter than my old Canon 5d, still definitely have shutter noise, owing to their focal plane shutters. Which current cameras are truly silent? (not denying, just curious)

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I was thinking about fine art photography, large prints and medium format at the weekend. Then it struck me, MF mirrorless could be the way to go for several sound technical reasons:

  • Gets rid of the huge mirror box and the vibrations from a big mirror. So the camera could be much more compact, easier to lay out and lighter. Would get away with a lighter tripod as well.
  • MF not usually used for high-speed action photography, so AF speed and and EVF would be less of an issue. Especially if EVF was high resolution and fast as with the Fuji X-T1. Few are faster than 1-2 frames per second.
  • Manual focus with focus peaking and other aids such as magnification is easier on a bright EVF than a dim glass screen
  • In the studio many MFD cameras are used tethered with a big EVF  - a laptop screen.

I love the idea of 50+MP MF camera smaller than a Mamiya 7 with AF especially if it had that undefinable "something" (micro-contrast?) that Leica and Fuji seem to have. If Phase One were to do it they would have access to all the lenses they use with their AFD and the old Mamiya AFD cameras - including a huge pool of manual focus lenses from the Mamiya 645. (and Fuji have GX680 lenses (not so many around) and designs from their MF compacts)

 

Apart from cost (and the Pentax MF is not much more expensive than top end FF Canon/Nikon) I don't see any real downsides.

 

The only problem is that the MF market is tiny so thge budget for RE&D will be limited. From a conversation with a pro dealer in the UK the market was probably only a few thousand cameras a year. Which is why Hasselblad has been financially tight for many years and no one else has entered the market, Pentax had a low key launch of their "new" camera.

 

Just a thought. Could it cause a resurgence in enthusiast/semi-pro MF like we saw with 645 introduction?

 

Just noticed David K suggested something similar in Cameracraft No 7. I don't recall reading it at the time but ...

Hi Martin,

I think PhaseOne is listening to our forum and particularly to you. Please read the following press release:

 

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/9012734727/phase-one-to-introduce-a-series-mirrorless-medium-format-camera-system

 

Cheers  ;) ,

Pavel

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I was thinking about fine art photography, large prints and medium format at the weekend. Then it struck me, MF mirrorless could be the way to go for several sound technical reasons:

<>

Just noticed David K suggested something similar in Cameracraft No 7. I don't recall reading it at the time but ...

Hi Martin,

I think PhaseOne is listening to our forum and particularly to you. Please read the following press release:

 

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/9012734727/phase-one-to-introduce-a-series-mirrorless-medium-format-camera-system

 

Cheers  ;) ,

Pavel

 

 

$43,780.00 for the cheapest option

 

Digital backs have existed almost as long as digital cameras.

 

wim

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Will there come a time when press conferences DEMAND silent cameras?

I'm getting my 5d2 back from the workshop next week but have been taking lots of pics with my RX10 and experimenting quite a bit.

I'm happy with it in some respects, but not in others, I love the silence, the lack of weight and the ability to hold it aloft on a monopod and shoot with my phone, but I dislike the electronic manual focus and the electronic zoom amongst other things.

 

It could be a possibility and flash too may become unacceptable, or photography will be restricted to set pieces (after all the event is there for the publicity). I was recently taking photos during live poetry and author readings with my Fuji X-T1 and I was often barely 10ft/3m away but it was not a problem. I used my Canon 1Ds3 once (I needed to use flash) and was embarassed by the noise and it was the only event in about 35 I covered where the audience feedback forms mentioned the photography - it was not just me it was also the guy from the local paper but unlike me he used his motordrive (ouch!).

 

 

Silent and mirrorless are not synonymous. My NEX cameras, for instance, while a lot quieter than my old Canon 5d, still definitely have shutter noise, owing to their focal plane shutters. Which current cameras are truly silent? (not denying, just curious)

 

 

True, few if any are truly silent - even a Leica M; a leaf shutter helps of course so the Fuji X100 may be nearer that ideal. But my Fuji X cameras are about as quiet as they get with a focal plane shutter and next month there will be a firmware update that should give my X-T1 an electronic shutter which should be completely noiseless (but may create image issues in some circumstances)

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My X100 has a completely silent option which I use almost 100% of the time, has to be turned off for flash to work…. :unsure:

Look forward to the XT1 update which will make it silent too  ;)

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I was thinking about fine art photography, large prints and medium format at the weekend. Then it struck me, MF mirrorless could be the way to go for several sound technical reasons:

<>

Just noticed David K suggested something similar in Cameracraft No 7. I don't recall reading it at the time but ...

Hi Martin,

I think PhaseOne is listening to our forum and particularly to you. Please read the following press release:

 

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/9012734727/phase-one-to-introduce-a-series-mirrorless-medium-format-camera-system

 

Cheers  ;) ,

Pavel

 

 

$43,780.00 for the cheapest option

 

Digital backs have existed almost as long as digital cameras.

 

wim

 

...and the Cambo Wide has been around even longer. The contemporary Wide RS models are similar in size and function to the Phase One, have Schneider lenses with shift/tilt as well as other lens options and take a variety of digital backs.

Basic Wide RS-1200 kit with lens starts around 6K euros, not including digital back.

https://www.calumetphoto.de/INTERSHOP/web/WFS/Calumet-DE-Site/de_DE/-/EUR/ViewParametricSearch-SimpleOfferSearch?SearchTerm=cambo+wide&search=&search=

Edited by DDoug

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Will there come a time when press conferences DEMAND silent cameras?

I'm getting my 5d2 back from the workshop next week but have been taking lots of pics with my RX10 and experimenting quite a bit.

I'm happy with it in some respects, but not in others, I love the silence, the lack of weight and the ability to hold it aloft on a monopod and shoot with my phone, but I dislike the electronic manual focus and the electronic zoom amongst other things.

 

It could be a possibility and flash too may become unacceptable, or photography will be restricted to set pieces (after all the event is there for the publicity). I was recently taking photos during live poetry and author readings with my Fuji X-T1 and I was often barely 10ft/3m away but it was not a problem. I used my Canon 1Ds3 once (I needed to use flash) and was embarassed by the noise and it was the only event in about 35 I covered where the audience feedback forms mentioned the photography - it was not just me it was also the guy from the local paper but unlike me he used his motordrive (ouch!).

 

 

Silent and mirrorless are not synonymous. My NEX cameras, for instance, while a lot quieter than my old Canon 5d, still definitely have shutter noise, owing to their focal plane shutters. Which current cameras are truly silent? (not denying, just curious)

 

Well I know the Nikon 1 [ sorry... but they have their place) can be totally silent and the Panasonic GX7 in my experience. With the latter, rolling shutter can be a big issue with moving subjects using the electronic shutter.

 

My main system is effectively Fuji now and they are pretty quiet. For anything moving fast or needing " long" in poor/average light and/or high speed flash only Nikon will do at the moment. However, Fuji X seems to get better and better and I expect my Nikon stuff will be used less and less - already is actually, much as I like it

John

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I was thinking about fine art photography, large prints and medium format at the weekend. Then it struck me, MF mirrorless could be the way to go for several sound technical reasons:

<>

Just noticed David K suggested something similar in Cameracraft No 7. I don't recall reading it at the time but ...

Hi Martin,

I think PhaseOne is listening to our forum and particularly to you. Please read the following press release:

 

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/9012734727/phase-one-to-introduce-a-series-mirrorless-medium-format-camera-system

 

Cheers  ;) ,

Pavel

 

 

$43,780.00 for the cheapest option

 

Digital backs have existed almost as long as digital cameras.

 

wim

 

...and the Cambo Wide has been around even longer. The contemporary Wide RS models are similar in size and function to the Phase One, have Schneider lenses with shift/tilt as well as other lens options and take a variety of digital backs.

Basic Wide RS-1200 kit with lens starts around 6K euros, not including digital back.

https://www.calumetphoto.de/INTERSHOP/web/WFS/Calumet-DE-Site/de_DE/-/EUR/ViewParametricSearch-SimpleOfferSearch?SearchTerm=cambo+wide&search=&search=

 

 

I appreciate that but you are hardly going to use the Cambo handheld for street photography (I know some people have done similar but why?). When I started the thread I was thinking about an alternative  to the MF SLR - something more akin to the Mamiya 7 or the Fuji G645 range. The Pentax 645D is much cheaper (~£9k with lens) than most of the MF alternatives but imagine a similar sensor in a G645 format body (a grown up X-Pro), with or without interchangeable lenses. That would give the top end FF dslrs a run for their money. Or even a 645  X-T1/ OMD equivalent - it could still be smaller/lighter than a big Canon or Nikon.

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I was thinking about fine art photography, large prints and medium format at the weekend. Then it struck me, MF mirrorless could be the way to go for several sound technical reasons:

<>

Just noticed David K suggested something similar in Cameracraft No 7. I don't recall reading it at the time but ...

Hi Martin,

I think PhaseOne is listening to our forum and particularly to you. Please read the following press release:

 

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/9012734727/phase-one-to-introduce-a-series-mirrorless-medium-format-camera-system

 

Cheers  ;) ,

Pavel

 

 

$43,780.00 for the cheapest option

 

Digital backs have existed almost as long as digital cameras.

 

wim

 

...and the Cambo Wide has been around even longer. The contemporary Wide RS models are similar in size and function to the Phase One, have Schneider lenses with shift/tilt as well as other lens options and take a variety of digital backs.

Basic Wide RS-1200 kit with lens starts around 6K euros, not including digital back.

https://www.calumetphoto.de/INTERSHOP/web/WFS/Calumet-DE-Site/de_DE/-/EUR/ViewParametricSearch-SimpleOfferSearch?SearchTerm=cambo+wide&search=&search=

 

 

I appreciate that but you are hardly going to use the Cambo handheld for street photography (I know some people have done similar but why?). When I started the thread I was thinking about an alternative  to the MF SLR - something more akin to the Mamiya 7 or the Fuji G645 range. The Pentax 645D is much cheaper (~£9k with lens) than most of the MF alternatives but imagine a similar sensor in a G645 format body (a grown up X-Pro), with or without interchangeable lenses. That would give the top end FF dslrs a run for their money. Or even a 645  X-T1/ OMD equivalent - it could still be smaller/lighter than a big Canon or Nikon.

 

It's an interresting exercise. Sony A7 type technology with an MF sensor and fixed lens. But are we not already "good enough" considering the use most of these images would be used for ?

Wouldn't the market be too small to make it worth while ? I don't know

Regards

John

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I appreciate that but you are hardly going to use the Cambo handheld for street photography (I know some people have done similar but why?). When I started the thread I was thinking about an alternative  to the MF SLR - something more akin to the Mamiya 7 or the Fuji G645 range. The Pentax 645D is much cheaper (~£9k with lens) than most of the MF alternatives but imagine a similar sensor in a G645 format body (a grown up X-Pro), with or without interchangeable lenses. That would give the top end FF dslrs a run for their money. Or even a 645  X-T1/ OMD equivalent - it could still be smaller/lighter than a big Canon or Nikon.

 

 

But why would you want a medium format camera for street photography, one of the poorest paying areas of photography. You don't need a quality sensor above what's around now. The people i know who want and use m/f do so in studios or more controlled environments, no issue with mirror boxes since often shot tethered. Indeed the large optical viewer is one of the great features of medium format.

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I was thinking about fine art photography, large prints and medium format at the weekend. Then it struck me, MF mirrorless could be the way to go for several sound technical reasons:

<>

Just noticed David K suggested something similar in Cameracraft No 7. I don't recall reading it at the time but ...

Hi Martin,

I think PhaseOne is listening to our forum and particularly to you. Please read the following press release:

 

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/9012734727/phase-one-to-introduce-a-series-mirrorless-medium-format-camera-system

 

Cheers  ;) ,

Pavel

 

 

$43,780.00 for the cheapest option

 

Digital backs have existed almost as long as digital cameras.

 

wim

 

...and the Cambo Wide has been around even longer. The contemporary Wide RS models are similar in size and function to the Phase One, have Schneider lenses with shift/tilt as well as other lens options and take a variety of digital backs.

Basic Wide RS-1200 kit with lens starts around 6K euros, not including digital back.

https://www.calumetphoto.de/INTERSHOP/web/WFS/Calumet-DE-Site/de_DE/-/EUR/ViewParametricSearch-SimpleOfferSearch?SearchTerm=cambo+wide&search=&search=

 

 

I appreciate that but you are hardly going to use the Cambo handheld for street photography (I know some people have done similar but why?). When I started the thread I was thinking about an alternative  to the MF SLR - something more akin to the Mamiya 7 or the Fuji G645 range. The Pentax 645D is much cheaper (~£9k with lens) than most of the MF alternatives but imagine a similar sensor in a G645 format body (a grown up X-Pro), with or without interchangeable lenses. That would give the top end FF dslrs a run for their money. Or even a 645  X-T1/ OMD equivalent - it could still be smaller/lighter than a big Canon or Nikon.

 

It's an interresting exercise. Sony A7 type technology with an MF sensor and fixed lens. But are we not already "good enough" considering the use most of these images would be used for ?

Wouldn't the market be too small to make it worth while ? I don't know

Regards

John

 

 

I would have thought so too but Pentax have just launched a new MF dslr at a price well below the current mf market. So they presumably think there is a market and since when has good enough ever been a limiting rteason for photography expenditure? The same could have been said when the film 645 boom happened.

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I appreciate that but you are hardly going to use the Cambo handheld for street photography (I know some people have done similar but why?). When I started the thread I was thinking about an alternative  to the MF SLR - something more akin to the Mamiya 7 or the Fuji G645 range. The Pentax 645D is much cheaper (~£9k with lens) than most of the MF alternatives but imagine a similar sensor in a G645 format body (a grown up X-Pro), with or without interchangeable lenses. That would give the top end FF dslrs a run for their money. Or even a 645  X-T1/ OMD equivalent - it could still be smaller/lighter than a big Canon or Nikon.

 

 

But why would you want a medium format camera for street photography, one of the poorest paying areas of photography. You don't need a quality sensor above what's around now. The people i know who want and use m/f do so in studios or more controlled environments, no issue with mirror boxes since often shot tethered. Indeed the large optical viewer is one of the great features of medium format.

 

 

I wasn't advocating it as a street camera really, just making the point that a Cambo is for the studio not a camera that is going to be hand held for general photography. Unlike say a G645 camera or even a Mamiya 7.

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I was thinking about fine art photography, large prints and medium format at the weekend. Then it struck me, MF mirrorless could be the way to go for several sound technical reasons:

<>

Just noticed David K suggested something similar in Cameracraft No 7. I don't recall reading it at the time but ...

Hi Martin,

I think PhaseOne is listening to our forum and particularly to you. Please read the following press release:

 

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/9012734727/phase-one-to-introduce-a-series-mirrorless-medium-format-camera-system

 

Cheers  ;) ,

Pavel

 

 

$43,780.00 for the cheapest option

 

Digital backs have existed almost as long as digital cameras.

 

wim

 

...and the Cambo Wide has been around even longer. The contemporary Wide RS models are similar in size and function to the Phase One, have Schneider lenses with shift/tilt as well as other lens options and take a variety of digital backs.

Basic Wide RS-1200 kit with lens starts around 6K euros, not including digital back.

https://www.calumetphoto.de/INTERSHOP/web/WFS/Calumet-DE-Site/de_DE/-/EUR/ViewParametricSearch-SimpleOfferSearch?SearchTerm=cambo+wide&search=&search=

 

 

I appreciate that but you are hardly going to use the Cambo handheld for street photography (I know some people have done similar but why?). When I started the thread I was thinking about an alternative  to the MF SLR - something more akin to the Mamiya 7 or the Fuji G645 range. The Pentax 645D is much cheaper (~£9k with lens) than most of the MF alternatives but imagine a similar sensor in a G645 format body (a grown up X-Pro), with or without interchangeable lenses. That would give the top end FF dslrs a run for their money. Or even a 645  X-T1/ OMD equivalent - it could still be smaller/lighter than a big Canon or Nikon.

 

It's an interresting exercise. Sony A7 type technology with an MF sensor and fixed lens. But are we not already "good enough" considering the use most of these images would be used for ?

Wouldn't the market be too small to make it worth while ? I don't know

Regards

John

 

 

I would have thought so too but Pentax have just launched a new MF dslr at a price well below the current mf market. So they presumably think there is a market and since when has good enough ever been a limiting rteason for photography expenditure? The same could have been said when the film 645 boom happened.

 

But isn't Pentax struggling ? [ as Nikon and Canon will be if they don't listen better to where the market is moving and provide a better service ]

Are they all going to "do a Kodak ".

It may wll be, of course, they [Pentax/Ricoh] have done all thier sums and many of the parts needed come out of exisitng components so their risk is small

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I agree about using something like the Cambo or Phase One for street photography. Personally I'm happy with Fuji and unless I were to get back into commercial shooting for clients with actual budgets, I'd like my gear to be smaller rather than larger. I was responding to the idea that the Phase One is an innovative new camera when something similar has been available for some time for less money.

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Certainly it seems that Pentax have taken a lot from their K-3 (?) - operationally the 645 is very similar apparently, similar menus etc. They already had the basic camera and lenses.

 

I agree Nikon/ Canon need to move quickly or they will indeed do a Kodak, or perhaps more likely become niche players - another Rollei (or Hasselblad) perhaps. I have said several times we are seeing the sailing ship effect with dslrs and there will be a truly professional, probably FF, mirrorless in the next year or two - something on par with the 1D or D4 series. Whether it will be from Canon or Nikon only time will tell ...

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I agree about using something like the Cambo or Phase One for street photography. Personally I'm happy with Fuji and unless I were to get back into commercial shooting for clients with actual budgets, I'd like my gear to be smaller rather than larger. I was responding to the idea that the Phase One is an innovative new camera when something similar has been available for some time for less money.

 

I am completely with you on all that.

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My reason for switching to mirrorless is something I don't see mentioned too often, so I'll bring it up here. With my Pentax DSLRs I had a problem with inaccurate placement of the screen. I replaced them with a split-image screens which needed a tedious bit of shimming to get pretty close to right at full aperture. Because of residual spherical aberration, it still wouldn't necessarily be right at f/8 or so, depending on the lens. So I took up using live view with an added loupe in critical situations until I realized it was ridiculous. With mirrorless, besides smaller and lighter, I get dead-on focus because of focusing on the sensor. Happily, Fuji lenses also seem to have very little RSA.

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Guest

Certainly it seems that Pentax have taken a lot from their K-3 (?) - operationally the 645 is very similar apparently, similar menus etc. They already had the basic camera and lenses.

 

I agree Nikon/ Canon need to move quickly or they will indeed do a Kodak, or perhaps more likely become niche players - another Rollei (or Hasselblad) perhaps. I have said several times we are seeing the sailing ship effect with dslrs and there will be a truly professional, probably FF, mirrorless in the next year or two - something on par with the 1D or D4 series. Whether it will be from Canon or Nikon only time will tell ...

 

If you look at the patents held by Canon you'll see they are doing a lot of r/d on new things, Indeed Canon's push into video is something that many on this forum should pay attention to....for example, looked at the splash page of Paypal UK recently....it's a video home page.

 

Nikon I don't get, countless new models doing the same thing but even a generation ago model like the 5D2 from Canon can produce raw video via a hack. The future is increased bandwidth, the needs for stock (in this case) need to take that into account...as amybe some manufacturers are doing already.

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I believe you are correct Geoff. Nikon has patents too. The constant variations and battery changes though are not encouraging and, in the case of Nikon, the gaps in in their DX/APS lens range, in particular faster primes. I think we may see too little too late with Nikon with a DX mirrorless [& Canon ] - by then I will be completely Fuji-X and on the basis of these forums, many will have "leaked to Fuji, Sony et al.

 

In the spirit of this thread an MF mirrorless would still be a studio camera I think

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I believe you are correct Geoff. Nikon has patents too. The constant variations and battery changes though are not encouraging and, in the case of Nikon, the gaps in in their DX/APS lens range, in particular faster primes. I think we may see too little too late with Nikon with a DX mirrorless [& Canon ] - by then I will be completely Fuji-X and on the basis of these forums, many will have "leaked to Fuji, Sony et al.

 

In the spirit of this thread an MF mirrorless would still be a studio camera I think

 

But John, the point is that these forums and the needs of these forums only account for a tiny number of people who are often shooting in a particular way (with some exceptions). There are some to have gone back to DSLRs after using Fujis - I expect the future to be a mixture. 

 

You have to remember that factors like a smaller camera actually are a problem for many users, I have to have a battery pack even on my Canon because it feels too small without. We have a 1000D for family/Facebook stuff and it feels like a toy. I noticed a review of one of the Sonys... (I am sniffing arund an a7r) which said the first thing to do was buy a battery pack to make it hand-holdable (reviewer had big hands).

 

What I want to see in cameras is better bracketing (take it away from remote controllers), better potential for bulb ramping and better dynamic range. I see mirrorless as maybe being a side issue when it comes to actual production of stills and more importantly footage.

Edited by Guest

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Geoff -I had not taken into accout the issue of size and handling but can say I flirted with a Sony Nex7 for a while and this was a problem for me - both with direct access to settings controls and chaotic menus. For general use the Fuji fits the bill for me but for almost all else only the DSLR will do. More dynamic range will come. [pardon my igonorance but is bulb ramping a gardening term...]

For travel by air have you tried taking even a modest DSLR system abroad as carry on ? This issue has fueled my interest in mirrorless and APS strikes the right balance at the moment for me.

You are also right about the small numbers using these forums have different priroities and "self select".

Best Wishes

John

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