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Perhaps we should join the Alzheimer society apparently you can met someone new everyday.

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They say if you write something down - with pen and paper - you are more likely to remember it than if you type it on the computer. That's why paper calendars still make sense for a lot of people even though our iPhones will ping and remind us we have an appointment. 

 

Retracing your steps from the beginning can help you remember what you got up from your desk to do -- as well as where you left your reading glasses somewhere along the way. 

 

Sending hugs your way Betty. It really is one of the cruelest things to watch a loved one suffer with. 

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On 06/01/2018 at 20:14, AlbertSnapper said:

..and going up the stairs then forgetting what you went up for when you get there.

I'm in my 40's and do that.

 

I have long believed it is nature's way of making us get more exercise as we get older. I can't remember until I go back down stairs and start again!

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2 hours ago, Martin P Wilson said:

 

I have long believed it is nature's way of making us get more exercise as we get older. I can't remember until I go back down stairs and start again!

 

A good friend of mine has just moved in to a bungalow. So that's one problem he won't be having.

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2 hours ago, AlbertSnapper said:

 

A good friend of mine has just moved in to a bungalow. So that's one problem he won't be having.

 

Also if he takes the doors off that issue will disappear too.

 

Allan

 

 

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6 hours ago, Marianne said:

They say if you write something down - with pen and paper - you are more likely to remember it than if you type it on the computer. That's why paper calendars still make sense for a lot of people even though our iPhones will ping and remind us we have an appointment. 

 

Retracing your steps from the beginning can help you remember what you got up from your desk to do -- as well as where you left your reading glasses somewhere along the way. 

 

Sending hugs your way Betty. It really is one of the cruelest things to watch a loved one suffer with. 

Thanks, Marianne. 

My husband’s problem is caused from many, many TIAs, mini strokes. His memory has been affected for 20 years, but the last 10 very obviously with the last 5 markedly.  It went unrecognized by the medical community, until I made the diagnosis based on my memory of what happened to my grandmother.

My theory was dismissed by our doctor for a year, until deep vein thrombosis in his leg proved he was throwing blood clots. 

He’s on blood thinners now, but the damage cannot be reversed. No Alzheimer’s. But many symptoms are the same.

Betty

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More hugs Betty from one in a similar situation, but Alzheimers is not the reason here.

 

Allan

 

 

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I have a birder friend. I like his view on this issue. He said if you have dementia, as a birder, every bird is a lifer. 

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1 hour ago, Allan Bell said:

 

More hugs Betty from one in a similar situation, but Alzheimers is not the reason here.

 

Allan

 

 

Hugs to you, too. :wub:

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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

Hugs to you, too. :wub:

 

Thank you Betty

 

Allan

 

 

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The relevant bit of this clip starts at 1.55. He brought the house down at his Fringe show with this suggestion (they've snipped the end of this clip):

 

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Thanks, Marianne. 

My husband’s problem is caused from many, many TIAs, mini strokes. His memory has been affected for 20 years, but the last 10 very obviously with the last 5 markedly.  It went unrecognized by the medical community, until I made the diagnosis based on my memory of what happened to my grandmother.

My theory was dismissed by our doctor for a year, until deep vein thrombosis in his leg proved he was throwing blood clots. 

He’s on blood thinners now, but the damage cannot be reversed. No Alzheimer’s. But many symptoms are the same.

Betty

 

You're more than welcome Betty.

 

Whatever the cause, it's such a tough situation for both of you. The local Alzheimer's Associations have great resources for patients, caregivers and their families and I would imagine they have great resources that will help with any kind of memory issues. They can help you find respite care and give you ideas of how to approach different issues. They are all volunteer and have offices across the country as well as being available by phone. If you haven't explored what they have to offer, I encourage you to do so.

 

I know my good thoughts can't make things better, but I wish they could.

 

Good thoughts and hugs for you too Allan.

 

Getting old ain't for sissies, that's for sure. I'm always shocked when I meet someone in their 90's who is sharp as a tack and still able to live on their own. It seems so much rarer than when I was a kid/young adult in the 1970's. I had lots of elderly great aunts and uncles, some who lived into their 100's, and some very elderly neighbors who all got on very well. Nowadays I can think of only three elderly acquaintances who made it into their 90's or to 100 with good enough mental and physical health to manage well with very little outside assistance (all gone now). Those Big Macs and all our horribly processed foods haven't helped, I'm guessing. 

Edited by Marianne

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1 hour ago, Cryptoprocta said:

The relevant bit of this clip starts at 1.55. He brought the house down at his Fringe show with this suggestion (they've snipped the end of this clip):

 

 

I ended up in a different episode but OMG I know how I'm wasting my afternoon. Thanks for sharing. This show is fun. Not one I've seen on my side of the pond before. 

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Episode 18 had me crying so funny but I think I liked the kittens and bubble wrap best because it was so random. 

 

I should be processing my huge backload of photos. You folks are a bad influence. Thanks B) 

 

 

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41 minutes ago, Marianne said:

 

You're more than welcome Betty.

 

Whatever the cause, it's such a tough situation for both of you. The local Alzheimer's Associations have great resources for patients, caregivers and their families and I would imagine they have great resources that will help with any kind of memory issues. They can help you find respite care and give you ideas of how to approach different issues. They are all volunteer and have offices across the country as well as being available by phone. If you haven't explored what they have to offer, I encourage you to do so.

 

I know my good thoughts can't make things better, but I wish they could.

 

Good thoughts and hugs for you too Allan.

 

Getting old ain't for sissies, that's for sure. I'm always shocked when I meet someone in their 90's who is sharp as a tack and still able to live on their own. It seems so much rarer than when I was a kid/young adult in the 1970's. I had lots of elderly great aunts and uncles, some who lived into their 100's, and some very elderly neighbors who all got on very well. Nowadays I can think of only three elderly acquaintances who made it into their 90's or to 100 with good enough mental and physical health to manage well with very little outside assistance (all gone now). Those Big Macs and all our horribly processed foods haven't helped, I'm guessing. 

I agree that the problem seems rampant compared to years ago. I do think environmental issues, food and the additives play a part, along with the fact that people are living longer and not dying before they develop memory issues.  When I was a girl, it was generally thought that 65 was a long life. Of course, some did live longer, but not nearly as many as now. 

Makes one wonder if medical care that greatly extends life is doing us a favor if it means we turn into a turnip and those extra years are spent in a fog.

Betty

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Yes Betty, I agree. It seems sometimes that the focus is on extending life at all costs, even costs that people would rather not bear both physically, emotionally and even financially, rather than improving its quality. 

 

But I'd freak out if a long life meant I only had 6 years left. These days 65 is the new 40 LOL.

 

Working at least part time as photographers, we get to keep our bodies and minds active, since it's not really something you retire from, so let's hope that keeps us young. B)

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1 hour ago, Marianne said:

Yes Betty, I agree. It seems sometimes that the focus is on extending life at all costs, even costs that people would rather not bear both physically, emotionally and even financially, rather than improving its quality. 

 

But I'd freak out if a long life meant I only had 6 years left. These days 65 is the new 40 LOL.

 

Working at least part time as photographers, we get to keep our bodies and minds active, since it's not really something you retire from, so let's hope that keeps us young. B)

Hear, hear! We need to keep ourself consistently challenged with learning something new. Complicated somethings!

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On 07/01/2018 at 10:55, Broad Norfolk said:

I think you'll find this is an all too common a problem, but if you remember you've forgotten something don't worry too much.

I feel I'm a bit ahead of the game at my three-score-years-and-ten time of life, and for quite a while I've resorted to using notelets to write thing down I want to remember. Believe me, it helps!! Only trouble is I have slips of paper all over the place as I'm not a very tidy person. My family have observed this, and one of my presents last Christmas was a perpetual calendar with a stack of notelets built into the base - very useful.

One of the things I often do, and it makes me smile every time, is when I'm mounting prints and go to the cupboard for a pair of scissors, I open the door and find I'm staring in at the 'fridge. It reminds me where I should be!

Well, Happy New Year to you all. Now where is that note I made about my next submission theme........

Jim :) 

Jim, Thank you so much. Good to know that I am not the only one! :-)

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Posted (edited)
On 06/01/2018 at 20:05, Betty LaRue said:

Normal, normal, normal.

It’s when you forget the child born last in the extended family, one you’ve seen in person, that you need to worry. Or you want to go to a shop you’ve visited dozens of times but no longer remember how to get there.

You open several cabinets trying to find the cups that have been in the same place for years.

Your spouse tells you that you both will be visiting Billy come the weekend, then you accuse the spouse of “never telling you anything” when it’s time to leave.

I'm caregiver to that, but now it’s much, much worse.

Forgetting where you put your keys, set your coffee down, what closet you put your hat in....that’s normal, many times from being distracted.

Betty

Hey Betty, Your anecdotes made me smile but then I realised that you were talking about your spouse. Must be very worrying. Thanks for sharing. Take care.

Edited by Jansos

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On 06/01/2018 at 20:19, Southpole said:

A GP once said to me as long as you remember not remembering there isnt a problem its when you dont remember not remembering:)

Good advice! Thanks. :-)

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On 08/01/2018 at 15:16, Betty LaRue said:

Thanks, Marianne. 

My husband’s problem is caused from many, many TIAs, mini strokes. His memory has been affected for 20 years, but the last 10 very obviously with the last 5 markedly.  It went unrecognized by the medical community, until I made the diagnosis based on my memory of what happened to my grandmother.

My theory was dismissed by our doctor for a year, until deep vein thrombosis in his leg proved he was throwing blood clots. 

He’s on blood thinners now, but the damage cannot be reversed. No Alzheimer’s. But many symptoms are the same.

Betty

Sorry to hear that Betty.

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6 hours ago, Jansos said:

Sorry to hear that Betty.

Thanks. :)

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On 08/01/2018 at 21:12, Marianne said:

 

I ended up in a different episode but OMG I know how I'm wasting my afternoon. Thanks for sharing. This show is fun. Not one I've seen on my side of the pond before. 

 

QI is one of the brightest sparks on UK television. It's been running for many years now and I don't think there's ever been an episode that disappointed.

 

Alan

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On 08/01/2018 at 20:56, Marianne said:

 

 

I know my good thoughts can't make things better, but I wish they could.

 

Good thoughts and hugs for you too Allan.

 

Getting old ain't for sissies, that's for sure. I'm always shocked when I meet someone in their 90's who is sharp as a tack and still able to live on their own. It seems so much rarer than when I was a kid/young adult in the 1970's. I had lots of elderly great aunts and uncles, some who lived into their 100's, and some very elderly neighbors who all got on very well. Nowadays I can think of only three elderly acquaintances who made it into their 90's or to 100 with good enough mental and physical health to manage well with very little outside assistance (all gone now). Those Big Macs and all our horribly processed foods haven't helped, I'm guessing. 

 

Thank you Marianne

 

I actually heard a doctor say, "Getting old is not good for you."

 

Allan

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