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I'm not a geologist, but looks to me like an example of folding of some kind, unless it's just your perspective or lens distortion producing that effect.

 

P.S. just noticed that you included "folding" in your caption

Edited by John Mitchell
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4 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

I'm not a geologist, but looks to me like an example of folding of some kind, unless it's just your perspective or lens distortion producing that effect.

 

P.S. just noticed that you included "folding" in your caption

Thanks john, its the fold that attracted me in the first place, looks frozen in mid flow so to speak.

 

2 hours ago, M.Chapman said:

If you know where it is, take a look at the British Geological Survey website interactive map which may give some info.

 

Mark

Thanks a lot Mark i'll give it a look.

Andy

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It's an Irish dry stone wall.:)

 

Allan

 

No offence Mick.

 

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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Hilarious Allan. Nothing like a bit of harmless national sterotyping for a good laugh B).  How is your old Brexit coming along then HaHaHa. A topic for discussion on Wednesday perhaps.

 

Actually below is an Irish dry stone wall most likely built during the Irish potato famine in the 1840s when millions of Irish people died of starvation primarily because of greedy British landlords. TThe famine walls were built so that starving people could receive a bit of food which couldn't come for free of course. No such thing as famine relief in the 19th century but then a bit of back-breaking hard labour never did anyone any harm. I think the Irish are pretty expert at building stone walls among other things and man do they contain some history.

 

Limestone pavement and stone wall at Keelhilla National Nature Reserve, the Burren, County Clare, Ireland Stock Photo

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On 01/07/2018 at 16:35, aphperspective said:

stratigraphic-section-rock-strata-with-quartz-veins-on-an-exposed-coastal-cliff-in-west-cork-ireland-folded-by-geological-movement-P68XK0.jpg

 

 

 

 

I have it as stratigraphic section, there is a large vein of quartz in the lower section, west coast of Ireland. Thanks in advance

 

 

Identifying geological features is not like identifying plants or animals. Either you look at an existing description if available (Irish Geological Survey) or you do an expert survey in the field.  It looks like a generic folded bedded rock but to be honest I doubt a picture like this would ever sell. There is not a big market for geological pictures and those that do sell need to be very clearly described and would probably have to be of a very specific feature if for a text book. I have sold 1 or  2 ever on here I think specifically for geology.

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9 hours ago, MDM said:

Hilarious Allan. Nothing like a bit of harmless national sterotyping for a good laugh B).  How is your old Brexit coming along then HaHaHa. A topic for discussion on Wednesday perhaps.

 

Actually below is an Irish dry stone wall most likely built during the Irish potato famine in the 1840s when millions of Irish people died of starvation primarily because of greedy British landlords. TThe famine walls were built so that starving people could receive a bit of food which couldn't come for free of course. No such thing as famine relief in the 19th century but then a bit of back-breaking hard labour never did anyone any harm. I think the Irish are pretty expert at building stone walls among other things and man do they contain some history.

 

Limestone pavement and stone wall at Keelhilla National Nature Reserve, the Burren, County Clare, Ireland Stock Photo

Very droll considering my name is any not mick but Andy and i'm English living in this fine country to boot. But nothing wrong with a bit of harmless fun.

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9 hours ago, MDM said:

 

Identifying geological features is not like identifying plants or animals. Either you look at an existing description if available (Irish Geological Survey) or you do an expert survey in the field.  It looks like a generic folded bedded rock but to be honest I doubt a picture like this would ever sell. There is not a big market for geological pictures and those that do sell need to be very clearly described and would probably have to be of a very specific feature if for a text book. I have sold 1 or  2 ever on here I think specifically for geology.

Thanks for that I have looked at the Irish Geological Survey for that area and looks like part of the mudstone plate which varies in thickness from 2m to over 180m. Interesting subject.

Andy

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6 minutes ago, aphperspective said:

Very droll considering my name is any not mick but Andy and i'm English living in this fine country to boot. But nothing wrong with a bit of harmless fun.

BTW we also have several famine walls in the village I live in and still standing the test of time.

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19 minutes ago, aphperspective said:

Very droll considering my name is any not mick but Andy and i'm English living in this fine country to boot. But nothing wrong with a bit of harmless fun.

 

I'm the Mick he was referring to and I don't consider national stereotyping of the Irish as stupid to be harmless fun. I consider it to be discriminatory behaviour in fact having been subjected to this sort of nonsense in the past (from people of far lower intelligence than myself I should add). It doesn't happen too much nowadays but when it does I tend to make my opinions known to the offender. Allan may have been better to have said no offence intended rather than no offence but that does not mean I do not find it offensive. I guess if it is made illegal for the vast majority of the population to obtain an education (the Irish Penal Laws which were extremely severe) then the result is going to be a fairly uneducated population.

 

EDIT Lack of education does not equate with stupidity but it may give the appearance of such

 

And stone walls can be a rather touchy subject when you know a little about Irish colonial history which I think very few British people do. 

Edited by MDM
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My mistake, and I agree about very few British knowing their colonial history here, my partner (who is a staunch republican) is constantly reminding holiday makers she overhears with wrong facts in the local pub of who did what to who and when. I will be considered a blow in until I shuffle of this place, but if anybody is visiting Skibbereen The Famine Heritage Centre is well worth a visit and a sobering one.

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2 minutes ago, aphperspective said:

My mistake, and I agree about very few British knowing their colonial history here, my partner (who is a staunch republican) is constantly reminding holiday makers she overhears with wrong facts in the local pub of who did what to who and when. I will be considered a blow in until I shuffle of this place, but if anybody is visiting Skibbereen The Famine Heritage Centre is well worth a visit and a sobering one.

 

No worries mate :D . I should add that I am not in any way a republican or a nationalist either. I can't really classify myself in fact. I am a human being I think. I believe in social justice and equality. Nationality means nothing to me in terms of how I feel and relate to people. My wife and son are English.

 

I consider the current rise of nationalism in many parts of the world to be extremely worrying and dangerous. I am almost supporting England in the World Cup in fact as I am a Tottenham fan and adore Harry Kane as a footballer (nothing whatsoever to do with the fact that he is half-Irish) as well as the other Spurs guys. I am  a little concerned about the effects an England victory would have in terms of a rise of nationalistic feeling here though. 

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Well we are both Rugby people so during the six nations we sit at opposite ends of the bar. ( actualy I am the only one at my end during the match):D Just changed my caption to a folded mudstone strata.

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14 hours ago, MDM said:

Hilarious Allan. Nothing like a bit of harmless national sterotyping for a good laugh B).  How is your old Brexit coming along then HaHaHa. A topic for discussion on Wednesday perhaps.

 

Actually below is an Irish dry stone wall most likely built during the Irish potato famine in the 1840s when millions of Irish people died of starvation primarily because of greedy British landlords. TThe famine walls were built so that starving people could receive a bit of food which couldn't come for free of course. No such thing as famine relief in the 19th century but then a bit of back-breaking hard labour never did anyone any harm. I think the Irish are pretty expert at building stone walls among other things and man do they contain some history.

 

Limestone pavement and stone wall at Keelhilla National Nature Reserve, the Burren, County Clare, Ireland Stock Photo

 

4 hours ago, aphperspective said:

Very droll considering my name is any not mick but Andy and i'm English living in this fine country to boot. But nothing wrong with a bit of harmless fun.

 

Sincerest appologies to Mick and Andy and all people of Irish extraction who may read this thread.:(

 

Allan

 

 

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No worries Allan. I know you meant it as harmless but I just don't take it that way. I'm sure there are lots of other Irish who don't take it like I do but I think this stuff is very 20th century now. Time to move on in every way. :)

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5 minutes ago, MDM said:

No worries Allan. I know you meant it as harmless but I just don't take it that way. I'm sure there are lots of other Irish who don't take it like I do but I think this stuff is very 20th century now. Time to move on in every way. :)

 

Agreed

 

Sorry again.

 

See you tomorrow.

 

Allan

 

 

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16 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Agreed

 

Sorry again.

 

See you tomorrow.

 

Allan

 

 

No worries enough said Allan the next time your in this fine part of the world mine will be a pint of Murphy's :)

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58 minutes ago, JeffGreenberg said:

Ireland split from North America, right...?

This very spot could be last point of contact!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

WHAT A ONE-OF-A-KIND NICHE PHOTO!!!!

Now if I could just find the other bit of the rock in the US !!!!!:mellow:

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25 minutes ago, aphperspective said:

Now if I could just find the other bit of the rock in the US !!!!!:mellow:

 

Just mirror it and apply a little bit of Photoshop?

 

wim

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On 7/1/2018 at 10:35, aphperspective said:

stratigraphic-section-rock-strata-with-quartz-veins-on-an-exposed-coastal-cliff-in-west-cork-ireland-folded-by-geological-movement-P68XK0.jpg

 

 

 

 

I have it as stratigraphic section, there is a large vein of quartz in the lower section, west coast of Ireland. Thanks in advance

 

 

Being a professional geologist for almost 30 years, I can only guess what those are, or as we say, educated guess.

The most prominent feature is the fold, or folded rocks. They bend upward. So call it an anticline. By the look of it, they appear to be interbedded sandstone (thick layers) and shale (thin layers). No idea what the age of the rocks. I have been to West coast of Ireland (Kilkee, County Clare?). If those are from anywhere near there, they are probably Carboniferous in age (360 - 300 million years ago). 

See if I can post a picture from there. Bridge of Ross, a natural bridge made of Carboniferous sandstone.

 

https://photos.app.goo.gl/WT8uAoi9VHoF9LJW6

Edited by Gabbro
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2 hours ago, Gabbro said:

 

Being a professional geologist for almost 30 years, I can only guess what those are, or as we say, educated guess.

The most prominent feature is the fold, or folded rocks. They bend upward. So call it an anticline. By the look of it, they appear to be interbedded sandstone (thick layers) and shale (thin layers). No idea what the age of the rocks. I have been to West coast of Ireland (Kilkee, County Clare?). If those are from anywhere near there, they are probably Carboniferous in age (360 - 300 million years ago). 

See if I can post a picture from there. Bridge of Ross, a natural bridge made of Carboniferous sandstone.

 

https://photos.app.goo.gl/WT8uAoi9VHoF9LJW6

Thanks for the advice and its on the coast of west cork about 35km from the mizen head more or less at the start of the mizen peninsular and all of the rock exposed on the coast around here have straight vertical layers, nothing even remotely horizontal for miles.

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18 hours ago, aphperspective said:

No worries enough said Allan the next time your in this fine part of the world mine will be a pint of Murphy's :)

 

And while you are drinking your Murphy's I will be sipping a Jamesons.:blink:

 

Allan

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

And while you are drinking your Murphy's I will be sipping a Jamesons.:blink:

 

Allan

 

 

That with dry ginger and ice was my fav tipple, purists will be raising their eye no doubt.:mellow:

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31 minutes ago, geogphotos said:

I'd think that what this image illustrates best is a type of fold called an 'anticline'.

 

I'm certainly not a geologist but to me it looks like sedimentary rock that has been metamorphosed.

 

I'd add words such as metamorphic, strata, fold, folded, bedding plane, layers.

Thanks for the input and helpful keywording, again never ceases to amaze me the depth of knowledge and help supplied on this forum.

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