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Cecile Marion

Plant ID Please

Question

I’ve just returned from several months of traveling and am working to add full captions and keywords to photos uploaded during that time. I’d appreciate help with the following two. Apparently I forgot to photograph their labels. Both photos were taken at Bercy Park, Paris, on August 31. The second was inside the kitchen garden area.

 

paris-france-WFM67N.jpg

 


paris-france-WFM7A0.jpg

 

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I'm no expert but (2) looks very much like hop. Google thinks so too. Humulus lupulus.

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I concur. Don't know about the first one though.

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#2 definitely hops, Humulus lupulus.

#1 is frustrating.  I just can't see enough detail in the image to positively ID the plants.  Having said that it might be worth looking at Abelia x grandiflora.  This has a pattern of red calyces and white flowers which look a little like your image.  Are the leaves variegated?

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Thanks so much! I appreciate the hops ID, and I’ll take a look at the first pic again. I might have a closer shot, but I don’t think identification of the plants in that photo isn’t as critical.
 

Hops makes sense. I never would have guessed it though. 

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4 hours ago, John Richmond said:

Are the leaves variegated?

Zooming in on the original at 200x, the leaves do appear to be variegated. Similar to this one.

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Ok. Thanks, John. I'll just list it as Abelia. 

 

Thanks again to all of you for the help. 

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On 16/11/2019 at 20:05, Cecile Marion said:


 

Hops makes sense. I never would have guessed it though. 

I'm surprised you didn't smell them, they can be quite pungent.

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Unfortunately, have a terrible sense of smell (though sometimes it’s actually a plus). 

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I’m back again to show my ignorance when it comes to plants. My best estimate is Peruvian Lily, Alstroemeria. The flowers were blooming in early September in the Tuileries Gardens, Paris. I’d appreciate help with identification. 
 

paris-france-WP93YT.jpg

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Yes, Alstroemeria.  One of the taller modern hybrids which flower over a long period.  Can't tell you the exact cultivar, though - there are quite a few with new ones coming out all the time.

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This is what my Abelia grandiflora looks like. The white flowers on yours looks too small. I guess that depends on how large the pot is. The whole plant in my picture was large enough to make a hedge with others of its kind. Over 5 feet tall. I think that’s where the “grandiflora comes from. 

 

AFEMPH.jpg

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10 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

This is what my Abelia grandiflora looks like. The white flowers on yours looks too small. I guess that depends on how large the pot is. The whole plant in my picture was large enough to make a hedge with others of its kind. Over 5 feet tall. I think that’s where the “grandiflora comes from. 

 

AFEMPH.jpg

 

Love the flutterby.😀  Or is it a moff?  I can't find it in my book of flutterbys.  Corse it could be an American species and not arrived in the UK yet.

 

Allan

 

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21 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Love the flutterby.😀  Or is it a moff?  I can't find it in my book of flutterbys.  Corse it could be an American species and not arrived in the UK yet.

 

Allan

 

That image is  so good Google can identify it.

Monarch, Danaus plexippus.They don't come here often.

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2 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

That image is  so good Google can identify it.

Monarch, Danaus plexippus.They don't come here often.

 

Ah! Got it. Thanks Mark. It is in my book with wing fully open. Wings partly closed in Betty's photo that is why I missed it.

 

Still a lovely image.

 

Allan

 

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Here you go. The Monarch butterfly holds a special place in the hearts of Americans, especially mine. Their numbers have been decreasing for at least the past 15 years, and there’s been a push for people and towns to plant the only plants they lay eggs on, several varieties of milkweed. They feed on many flowers but only lay eggs on the milkweed. Monarchs migrate in late summer/early fall. In September I looked up in the sky and saw at least a couple of hundred of them circling over my house, waiting for a stream of southerly wind to help carry them south, ultimately to a mountainous area in central Mexico. Thousands of them can be seen hanging in trees, wing to wing in Mexico. I’d love to see it.
I live in Kansas, Oklahoma before, right in the path of their migration.

My next-door neighbor has milkweed, and she harvests a few eggs and raises them in a butterfly cage. She’s a teacher, and shows the progression in school. They left on vacation in early fall, and she brought the cage with chrysalis over to me to babysit. What a thrill it was, to see the wet, unfolding wings when it crawled out of the chrysalis. In a few hours, when it’s wing we’re dry, I took it to my butterfly bush and placed it on a flower. In another half hour, it took off for the migration. Amazing how they instinctively know.

The first image is of the butterfly I cared for.

2A6NN28.jpgA868HR.jpgB4H1RM.jpg

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Yes, I love them too. We even had some here in NYC a few months ago. I remember watching butterflies emerge in a jar when I was a child but I think they were swallowtails. i grew up in San Diego.

 

Paulette

Edited by NYCat

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KBC272.jpg
Pipevine swallowtail

Edited by Betty LaRue

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Thanks, Betty.

 

Paulette

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I’m wondering if I’m correct in thinking this is a chestnut tree. Photos were taken in mid-September (during somewhat of a drought) in the forest of Saint-Germain-en-Laye, west of Paris. I hadn’t planned to use then but, since they were accidentally included in an upload, I figured I might as well leave them in place.

 

saint-germain-en-laye-france-WW2X6A.jpg

 

saint-germain-en-laye-france-WW2X10.jpg

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Yes, horse chestnut, Aesculus hippocastanum.  Looking at the foliage it looks like it's infected with leaf blotch, caused by a fungal infection (Phyllosticta paviae)

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