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Allan Bell

Settings used on Sony RX100 (mk3)

Question

I am going to carry out a shoot indoors just using available lighting (no flash) and would like some advice from other users of RX100's who have done this already.

 

What settings give you the best results handheld to produce a workable RAW file?

 

Do you use M,S,A,P, or gold or green camera setting?

 

Thank you in advance for any replies.

 

Allan

 

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You didn't say what the subject was nor the use.

Does the subject move? At what speed? What light levels? Is the subject stationary? - could include models posing.

Are the images going to be printed? Published on Facebook? Alamy? Billboard? You get the idea.

So this is very general:

Play around/practice at home at the expected light levels and see at what shutter speeds your images are sharp enough.

And what level of graininess is acceptable for the purpose.

Not RAW but very useful is the handheld twilight scene mode. High speed continuous drive and RAW will do the same, but then you will have to do the editing by hand: delete all less than sharp images from the burst and stack/median the rest in Photoshop.

After practicing at home, do a test run at the actual venue.

 

wim

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Thanks wim. Nothing specific just general. Mostly reasonably well lit. Mainly static or slowish movement. General stock imagery.

 

Allan

 

Edited by Allan Bell

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P, but then I use program for most things. Or A at the widest aperture you have, or S at the slowest shutter speed you trust yourself with if you need DoF.

My A58 is fine at 3200 so you should  be able to go at least that far.

Edited by spacecadet

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The reason Wim is asking so many questions is that the answer to your question is different with the different subject situatiions. 

 

In general, I use Aperture Prority (A). But sometimes I cover myself with Auto (gold) and the Twilight Scene. If you're using the 100-3 on auto-focus, I suggest that you snap 4 or 5 frames to get one, because the Sony auto-focus on those earlier models is inconsistent. I keep my auto ISO at a max of 800 or sometimes 1600.

 

Tripods are useful. 😎

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Thanks for your input Mark.

 

Allan

 

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1 minute ago, Ed Rooney said:

The reason Wim is asking so many questions is that the answer to your question is different with the different subject situatiions. 

 

In general, I use Aperture Prority (A). But sometimes I cover myself with Auto (gold) and the Twilight Scene. If you're using the 100-3 on auto-focus, I suggest that you snap 4 or 5 frames to get one, because the Sony auto-focus on those earlier models is inconsistent. I keep my auto ISO at a max of 800 or sometimes 1600.

 

Tripods are useful. 😎

 

Thank you Edo note taken but tripods are not allowed.

 

Allan

 

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10 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Thank you Edo note taken but tripods are not allowed.

 

Allan

 

A monopod?

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Image stabilization is our digital tripod.

 

I have something called essential tremor (familiar tremor). It's not from aging. I've had this slight tremor all my life. To compansate, I follow a serious handholding method. If at all possible, the camera is over the bulk of my body, meaning I don't hold it out in front of me. So I use the viewfinder and not the back screen. 

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3 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Image stabilization is our digital tripod.

 

I have something called essential tremor (familiar tremor). It's not from aging. I've had this slight tremor all my life. To compansate, I follow a serious handholding method. If at all possible, the camera is over the bulk of my body, meaning I don't hold it out in front of me. So I use the viewfinder and not the back screen. 

 

Interesting. I do the opposite: I hold it like you would handle an old Rolleiflex, cradled in my hands and my hands or wrists held against my body. Not too firm though, because tension induces movement as we know from shooting. I use my thumb on the release button. My left thumb is in the same position on the left on top of the viewfinder which I never use. 1/2s is well possible in this position. The back screen is tilted towards me and usually the electronic level is visible. Plus always the one thirds lines.

This position is stable enough to allow looking up without changing much the way the camera is pointing, say up to 35mm.

If you hold the camera lower than your belly button, it will look very odd to onlookers if they do not spot the camera though 🙋‍♂️👮‍♂️👩‍⚖️ - 😁.

 

My tremor is usually because of the lack of food or sugar. But any excitement or physical exercise will cause even more unsteadiness. It's a wonder I do manage to get any sharp image at all. Those image stabilization thingies are pure magic! 👴😁

Using the 24fps on the MkV and MkVI reveals how many images are actually blurred and how little are pin sharp in a second. So I use that a function a lot now. It does eat hard disk space though.

 

Btw I only use full AUTO or A. On A I usually use exposure bracketing.

 

wim

 

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We're not so far apart on all points, Wim. I use my thumb on vertical snaps. And I agree about having a soft-but-firm grip. 

 

The camera sits over my body with my head tilted back a little. If I reach out, the trembling begins. (I can't reach out and pick up a glass of wine with my right hand.)

 

If I look at the screen instead of through the viewfinder, I get no visual intimacy. I began as a portrait photographer for actors, watching the level of expression in the subject's eyes. I can't see that on a back screen. 

 

What you are attempting, Allan, is hard to do. If I were to have an assignment like that, I would insist on using bounce or defused flash. Otherwise, you'll be getting a lot of failed frames. 

 

Edo

Edited by Ed Rooney

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6 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

What you are attempting, Allan, is hard to do. If I were to have an assignment like that, I would insist on using bounce or defused flash. Otherwise, you'll be getting a lot of failed frames.

 

Yep, hence the 24fps. Failed frames cost nothing. Except when you don't throw them away and have to store them. But even then. Last week I bought a second 10Tb hdd for 316 euros.

 

wim

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22 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

What you are attempting, Allan, is hard to do.

 

So I discovered yesterday.  I will do it, just got to figure out the best way.

 

Flash (direct, bounce or diffused), including constant light sources, tripods and monopods simply not allowed. Can only work with available light.

 

Allan

 

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5 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

So I discovered yesterday.  I will do it, just got to figure out the best way.

 

Flash (direct, bounce or diffused), including constant light sources, tripods and monopods simply not allowed. Can only work with available light.

 

Allan

 

A very curious and highly specific set of prohibitions, I have to say. I wonder what the reasoning is.

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I've just picked up a Sony RX100 III on eBay (£200... go on... reassure me that I've got a good deal!), so I'm looking at this thread with more than usual interest...

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17 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

So I discovered yesterday.  I will do it, just got to figure out the best way.

 

Flash (direct, bounce or diffused), including constant light sources, tripods and monopods simply not allowed. Can only work with available light.

 

Allan

 

 

Handheld twilight mode on the RX100 works really well, providing subject is stationary and you don't want too much depth of field. As the light gets lower the RX100 (in handheld twilight mode) will open lens aperture, crank up the ISO and then take a number of short exposures and combine to reduce noise. It's surprisingly effective. My Lumix G5 also has a handheld twilight mode but it's rubbish compared to the RX100.

 

Mark

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John, that sounds like a very good deal. The only warning I must give about the 100-3 is that the autofocus doesn't work 100% of the time. As long as you snap a few extra frames you'll be fine. These little Sonys are amazing machines. I favor Aperture Priority, golden auto, and the Twilight Scene that Mark just explained. 

 

Edo

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hold the camera against columns, pillars, chairs, etc.  or walk in there with a limp and a monopod/walking stick.

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Robert, I wonder if, when you were recently on Mulberry Street in NYC, you noticed if Angelo's restaurant was open? I lived on the 4th floor above it. 

Edited by Ed Rooney

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16 hours ago, sooth said:

or walk in there with a limp and a monopod/walking stick.

 

Sorry Sooth I was laughing at the suggestion of a limp. I am sure I would forget about it and give the game away. Either that or find myself still limping a week later.

 

Allan

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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1 hour ago, Ed Rooney said:

Robert, I wonder if, when you were recently on Mulberry Street in NYC, you noticed if Angelo's restaurant was open? I lived on the 4th floor above it. 

 

Thinking of going back Edo?

 

Allan

 

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17 hours ago, M.Chapman said:

 

Handheld twilight mode on the RX100 works really well, providing subject is stationary and you don't want too much depth of field. As the light gets lower the RX100 (in handheld twilight mode) will open lens aperture, crank up the ISO and then take a number of short exposures and combine to reduce noise. It's surprisingly effective. My Lumix G5 also has a handheld twilight mode but it's rubbish compared to the RX100.

 

Mark

 

Thanks Mark but, I believe, HT produces jpegs and I am after RAWs. However I will give it a go and see what transpires.

 

Allan

 

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1 hour ago, Ed Rooney said:

Robert, I wonder if, when you were recently on Mulberry Street in NYC, you noticed if Angelo's restaurant was open? I lived on the 4th floor above it. 

Edo does this help?

Nigel

 

https://www.earthcam.com/usa/newyork/littleitaly/?cam=littleitaly

Edited by Nigel Kirby

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13 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Thinking of going back Edo?

 

Allan

 

 

Nope.

 

I have that EarthCam, Nigel. It doesn't show Angelo's. It's on the same side of the street just south of the restaurant and my front door.  

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3 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Nope.

 

I have that EarthCam, Nigel. It doesn't show Angelo's. It's on the same side of the street just south of the restaurant and my front door.  

 

In a way I am pleased to hear that Edo.

 

Allan

 

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23 hours ago, John Morrison said:

I've just picked up a Sony RX100 III on eBay (£200... go on... reassure me that I've got a good deal!), so I'm looking at this thread with more than usual interest...

 

John I have the RX100 mk3, as you may have gathered, and have a lot of images from it on Alamy. I don't think any have failed QC.

 

Also I have not encountered Edo's problem of hit and miss auto focus.

 

Allan

 

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