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Bill Kuta

Considering move to Adobe CC from standalone LR6

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First, yes, I've read prior posts on this, and have googled a bit. Just a couple of questions, mostly to verify:

 

 

Adobe CC users don't pay any upgrade fee for new major versions, correct?

 

Are your LR catalogs stored in the Adobe cloud or on your PC?

 

Has anyone had any kind of difficulty in switching from standalone LR to CC?

 

 

thanks (considering a B&H current US discount)

Bill Kuta

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Do not hesitate, just do it!   It costs just a few Pounds/Dollars a month and it works, worth every penny.

 

Plus, the CC version is starting to be different, as in having addition features and more advanced that the 'Stand Alone' version

 

For the future I see all professional software 'Sold As a Service' with a monthly subscription; already my accounts are there and other software.

 

No regret in changing

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Plus, the CC version is starting to be different, as in having addition features and more advanced that the 'Stand Alone' version

 

 

 

Yeah, my son told me the Haze filter is very good, but I see that it's only in the CC version so far. 

 

Will definitely be moving to CC.

 

thanks all

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Bill

 

I wise move.

 

It is almost worth it for the Haze Filter (or what ever the correct term is) alone, a great control that is fast becoming a regular part of my workflow.

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I have, and use, PSE 14 for some of my processing and it has the Haze filter.

 

Also use LR6 stand alone.

 

Allan

Edited by Allan Bell

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I have, and use, PSE 14 for some of my processing and it has the Haze filter.

 

Also use LR6 stand alone.

 

Allan

 

 

Interesting. The problem with PSE is that it only does 8-bit processing. Once you've processed an image in 8 bits, you can't get back what you lost. The most noticeable problem I had with that was banding in the sky and very dark areas due to a lack of colours.

 

Also when I used PSE, it wasn't capable of layer masks. I didn't even understand what they were at the time so I didn't care, but now I couldn't edit without them. I have a feeling they were introduced in PSE in later versions though.

 

Geoff.

 

 

 

PSE 14 does indeed have layer masks.

 

I have not found banding in my 8 bit processed images with PSE 14 to be a problem. Never seen it occur.

 

Allan

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Before you sign up do some research and see if you can get any discounts on CC. I got a 20% limited deal direct of Adobe. Flickr also had a deal for members.

 

One of the advantages I saw going from PSE to full PS was in my Alamy workflow. The ability to run actions has made processing quicker/easier by automating repetitive tasks using actions. For example I have one for dust spotting that creates the layers, inverts the colours and selects the correct brush. 

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I guess it depends in how you work or indeed the type and volume of your work. For me the thought of paying for the rest of my life or I have nothing, just grates in with me. Hate being held to ransom.

I know that the upgrades were very costly but I often questioned whether we always needed them anyway.

With my head buried partly in the sand, I work on the principle that what I haven't had I haven't missed and more importantly my shots are selling, without CC!

But there we are this has been discussed at length as you mentioned.

 

I have not downloaded this as yet, very little need for most of my work. But some reviews state this is as good as CC. I can't judge having not used it just putting it out there.

 

http://www.proloststore.com/products/dehaze

Edited by Trevor Chriss
  • Upvote 3

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The problem with PSE is that it only does 8-bit processing. Once you've processed an image in 8 bits, you can't get back what you lost. The most noticeable problem I had with that was banding in the sky and very dark areas due to a lack of colours.

Geoff.

 

 

PSE 7 and 8 (and I believe the latest versions) do have 16 bit processing on the processes where it matters, e.g. contrast, brightness levels, shadow and highlight expansion. I export from Lightroom to PSE as 16 bit PSD, carry out adjustments to levels etc., then convert to 8 bit for the cloning etc. which only work at 8 bit. I probably should make these adjustments in LR6, but I find it easier in PSE. I do a batch convert from RAW to PSD in LR with all my "default" adjustments that will be applied to all images in the batch. I then make the final tweaks in PSE since that's where I also do cloning and dust spotting. 

Edited by M.Chapman

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Doing an assignment in the States recently, I had an opportunity to use my client's CC Lightroom and liked the dehaze slider. Cool.

Meanwhile, I'm getting by with my standalone version, and the Prolost plugin: http://www.proloststore.com/products/dehaze

It works well enough.

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Not sure how much longer I will be at this game, so a long standing commitment is not appropriate for me. I do want, and have, stand alone versions which will always be available for personal work.

 

Horses for courses.

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The problem with PSE is that it only does 8-bit processing. Once you've processed an image in 8 bits, you can't get back what you lost. The most noticeable problem I had with that was banding in the sky and very dark areas due to a lack of colours.

Geoff.

 

 

PSE 7 and 8 (and I believe the latest versions) do have 16 bit processing on the processes where it matters, e.g. contrast, brightness levels, shadow and highlight expansion. I export from Lightroom to PSE as 16 bit PSD, carry out adjustments to levels etc., then convert to 8 bit for the cloning etc. which only work at 8 bit. I probably should make these adjustments in LR6, but I find it easier in PSE. I do a batch convert from RAW to PSD in LR with all my "default" adjustments that will be applied to all images in the batch. I then make the final tweaks in PSE since that's where I also do cloning and dust spotting. 

 

 

 

Cloning in LR is easy. Try it.

 

Allan

  • Upvote 2

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The problem with PSE is that it only does 8-bit processing. Once you've processed an image in 8 bits, you can't get back what you lost. The most noticeable problem I had with that was banding in the sky and very dark areas due to a lack of colours.

Geoff.

 

 

PSE 7 and 8 (and I believe the latest versions) do have 16 bit processing on the processes where it matters, e.g. contrast, brightness levels, shadow and highlight expansion. I export from Lightroom to PSE as 16 bit PSD, carry out adjustments to levels etc., then convert to 8 bit for the cloning etc. which only work at 8 bit. I probably should make these adjustments in LR6, but I find it easier in PSE. I do a batch convert from RAW to PSD in LR with all my "default" adjustments that will be applied to all images in the batch. I then make the final tweaks in PSE since that's where I also do cloning and dust spotting. 

 

 

 

Cloning in LR is easy. Try it.

 

Allan

 

 

Mmm so it is. I just took a look. I was using LR4 until very recently. Cloning/healing seems much more powerful in LR6. Must play some more. Thanks!

 

Update: I did play some more. Cloning in LR6 on my computer is very slow, it's taking around 1sec to carry out a small (75 pixel) circular clone. Am I doing something wrong? I note that in my LR6 performance section "Use graphic processor" is "Disabled due to errors". 

 

Maybe my MacBook Pro just isn't up to the job? If so I'll have to stick with PSE where, although I have to pick the source manually, cloning is virtually instantaneous.

Edited by M.Chapman

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Do I take it this LR cloning referred to here  is the removal of dust spots etc, not the deliberate and accurate copying of one spot to another? I use LR cloning to get rid of muck in the sky, but, to the best of my knowledge, you can't mask off an area precisely and then clone knowing that you won't be erasing something of value. Maybe I'm wrong? 

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Do I take it this LR cloning referred to here  is the removal of dust spots etc, not the deliberate and accurate copying of one spot to another? I use LR cloning to get rid of muck in the sky, but, to the best of my knowledge, you can't mask off an area precisely and then clone knowing that you won't be erasing something of value. Maybe I'm wrong? 

 

Yes it seems good for removing dust, bits of litter, even overhead wires against the sky. But precise control in LR seems (to me) to be more difficult than "painting" with a well setup cloning brush in PSE. But I'm very much a novice in LR6...

Edited by M.Chapman
  • Upvote 1

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I didn't realise the Haze control was part of CC only, I have a subscription and very happy with it, although I just use lightroom for 95% of the time.  I made a sale on Alamy on the back of this. Was just out walking on the beach, saw an opportunity to get a windsurfer in front of a lighthouse, light was bad, sea mist etc.  Wound up the dehaze and the difference was amazing ! - in the paper the next day :-)  The only thing is it does introduce noise, dustspots become very pronounced and colours go all over the place - well at least it does for me, so one to be used judiciously.

 

regards Simon

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Do I take it this LR cloning referred to here  is the removal of dust spots etc, not the deliberate and accurate copying of one spot to another? I use LR cloning to get rid of muck in the sky, but, to the best of my knowledge, you can't mask off an area precisely and then clone knowing that you won't be erasing something of value. Maybe I'm wrong? 

 

Yes it seems good for removing dust, bits of litter, even overhead wires against the sky. But precise control in LR seems (to me) to be more difficult than "painting" with a well setup cloning brush in PSE. But I'm very much a novice in LR6...

 

 

 

A useful tip, if you have not found it yet, is the "Visualise Spots" slider down at the bottom left of the screen in the develop mode.

 

Tick the box to the left of the wording and the image turns to black and white negative with edges lined in white. Even clouds show white edges both at the visible edge and within the cloud. Clouds are not uniform hence the inner edges.

 

If you then advance the slider, to the right of the wording, to the right hand end, not all the way but until the neg image is at a stage you are comfortable with, you will see a lot of the white edges start to disappear and the dust spots, distant birds and even flying insects are more pronounced against the black sky.

 

By clicking on the box to the left of the wording you can switch back and forth between the "neg" image and the normal image. I find this useful at times as it can prevent you from cloning out something that needs to be in the image and visa versa.

 

Hope this helps but please ask if you have any questions.  (Oh hell! What have I just said?)

 

Allan

 

PS You can control the size of the clone brush by using the scroll function on your mouse. If you are using one. Makes for easy adjustment without dipping into the sliders in the righthand panel.

 

ITMA

Edited by Allan Bell

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I have tried with LR cloning and to me it is not so very user friendly, compared to PS3.

My workflow, long winded for some no doubt, is most processing in LR6, then into PS to check for dust etc.

This might be slow but I personally find this the best way to work.

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For those of you who do not have the dehaze filter in the earlier versions of stand alone PS or PSE you could try the following which I found on another site. I hope the originator won't mind me repeating the method verbatim here.

 

If you use an earlier version of PSE, follow these steps for a similar haze reduction:

  • Flatten your image.
  • Type command (Mac) or control (PC) J to duplicate the Background layer.
  • Go to the Enhance Menu and select Unsharp Mask.
  • Try any of the following amounts:
    • Amount 20, Radius, 60, Threshold 1
    • Amount 30, Radius 60, Threshold 0,
    • Amount 20, Radius 25, Threshold 0,
    • Or anything else that works for you. The key is that your Amount should be smaller than your Radius.

I have not tried this for myself.

 

Allan

Edited by Allan Bell

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Something to bear in mind is that while you can pay for the package yearly direct from Adobe, you can also buy a voucher from Amazon which is simply a pre-paid yearly sub from Adobe. I did this the first year and saved about £6 on the total yearly cost, this year, it was being sold at just £71 on Amazon for a few weeks, so got it then, and that means a saving of around £30.

 

Right now it is on Amazon as this "Adobe Creative Cloud Photography Plan: Photoshop CC Plus Lightroom - 12-Month Licence - Key Card (PC/Mac)"                               

Price: £75.10 FREE UK delivery.

 

 

Malcolm

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Do I take it this LR cloning referred to here  is the removal of dust spots etc, not the deliberate and accurate copying of one spot to another? I use LR cloning to get rid of muck in the sky, but, to the best of my knowledge, you can't mask off an area precisely and then clone knowing that you won't be erasing something of value. Maybe I'm wrong? 

 

Yes it seems good for removing dust, bits of litter, even overhead wires against the sky. But precise control in LR seems (to me) to be more difficult than "painting" with a well setup cloning brush in PSE. But I'm very much a novice in LR6...

 

 

 

A useful tip, if you have not found it yet, is the "Visualise Spots" slider down at the bottom left of the screen in the develop mode.

 

Tick the box to the left of the wording and the image turns to black and white negative with edges lined in white. Even clouds show white edges both at the visible edge and within the cloud. Clouds are not uniform hence the inner edges.

 

If you then advance the slider, to the right of the wording, to the right hand end, not all the way but until the neg image is at a stage you are comfortable with, you will see a lot of the white edges start to disappear and the dust spots, distant birds and even flying insects are more pronounced against the black sky.

 

By clicking on the box to the left of the wording you can switch back and forth between the "neg" image and the normal image. I find this useful at times as it can prevent you from cloning out something that needs to be in the image and visa versa.

 

Hope this helps but please ask if you have any questions.  (Oh hell! What have I just said?)

 

Allan

 

PS You can control the size of the clone brush by using the scroll function on your mouse. If you are using one. Makes for easy adjustment without dipping into the sliders in the righthand panel.

 

ITMA

 

 

Many thanks. I had found all those features (I watched some excellent videos). I particularly like the visualise spots feature, but the sluggish speed I'm seeing is limiting the usefulness at the moment.

Edited by M.Chapman

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For those of you who do not have the dehaze filter in the earlier versions of stand alone PS or PSE you could try the following which I found on another site. I hope the originator won't mind me repeating the method verbatim here.

 

If you use an earlier version of PSE, follow these steps for a similar haze reduction:

  • Flatten your image.
  • Type command (Mac) or control (PC) J to duplicate the Background layer.
  • Go to the Enhance Menu and select Unsharp Mask.
  • Try any of the following amounts:
    • Amount 20, Radius, 60, Threshold 1
    • Amount 30, Radius 60, Threshold 0,
    • Amount 20, Radius 25, Threshold 0,
    • Or anything else that works for you. The key is that your Amount should be smaller than your Radius.

I have not tried this for myself.

 

Allan

 

Sounds similar to the results available by using the clarity slider in ACR/LR?

Edited by M.Chapman

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Do I take it this LR cloning referred to here  is the removal of dust spots etc, not the deliberate and accurate copying of one spot to another? I use LR cloning to get rid of muck in the sky, but, to the best of my knowledge, you can't mask off an area precisely and then clone knowing that you won't be erasing something of value. Maybe I'm wrong? 

 

Yes it seems good for removing dust, bits of litter, even overhead wires against the sky. But precise control in LR seems (to me) to be more difficult than "painting" with a well setup cloning brush in PSE. But I'm very much a novice in LR6...

 

 

 

A useful tip, if you have not found it yet, is the "Visualise Spots" slider down at the bottom left of the screen in the develop mode.

 

Tick the box to the left of the wording and the image turns to black and white negative with edges lined in white. Even clouds show white edges both at the visible edge and within the cloud. Clouds are not uniform hence the inner edges.

 

If you then advance the slider, to the right of the wording, to the right hand end, not all the way but until the neg image is at a stage you are comfortable with, you will see a lot of the white edges start to disappear and the dust spots, distant birds and even flying insects are more pronounced against the black sky.

 

By clicking on the box to the left of the wording you can switch back and forth between the "neg" image and the normal image. I find this useful at times as it can prevent you from cloning out something that needs to be in the image and visa versa.

 

Hope this helps but please ask if you have any questions.  (Oh hell! What have I just said?)

 

Allan

 

PS You can control the size of the clone brush by using the scroll function on your mouse. If you are using one. Makes for easy adjustment without dipping into the sliders in the righthand panel.

 

ITMA

 

 

Many thanks. I had found all those features (I watched some excellent videos). I particularly like the visualise spots feature, but the sluggish speed I'm seeing is limiting the usefulness at the moment.

 

 

 

When I initially start to clone out spots in LR6 it is fine but if there a lot to do I see it slowing down too. I do not know why this should be but I believe that Adobe are supposed to be working to resolve the issue.

 

Allan

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Just received an email from Adobe stating that you can get Adobe CC for £6.98 inc VAT/month if you join before 2nd September.

 

Personally I will not be subscribing.

 

Allan

Edited by Allan Bell

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