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12 hours ago, Trelawny Welles said:

I haven't uploaded anything yet. What I don't understand is: if my photos have been worked on in PS, does that make them ineligible? I've been shooting with a Canon DSLR in RAW format, saving pics I like especially as TIFF files and the rest as PNG's. 

 

If you want to upload to Alamy, you can't upload TIFFs or PNGs, has to be jpgs.

 

Jill

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12 hours ago, Trelawny Welles said:

What I don't understand is: if my photos have been worked on in PS, does that make them ineligible?

 

No. See:

 

https://www.alamy.com/contributor/how-to-sell-images/guidelines-for-submitting-images/?section=3&_gl=1*1caab6t*_ga*MjMwOTc1NjQ2LjE2MDU4Njg5ODk.*_ga_M5V9H9N7G8*MTY3MDI0NTU1OC4xNDc5LjEuMTY3MDI0NzM2Mi4wLjAuMA..

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Just one thing to consider, if you are uploading news photos, there should be no cloning or similar digital manipulation. 

 

If I edit an editorial or scenic shot, as opposed to news, I normally describe any manipulation that has occured, e.g power cables cloned out, during keywording after upload.

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It's good that you are saving them in lossless formats. You don't want to process jpeg files, but once you're finished processing them, save/export an additional version as jpeg since that is the only format that Alamy will accept. Their database is huge and jpegs are generally the smallest files; they don't accept png or Tiff. 

 

Good luck!

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  • 1 month later...

Hello, thanks for all the responses,. I was forced to put this on ther back burner until now, and now I'm back with another question. The guidelines for passing QC include

 

  • File size of over 17MB (when uncompressed/open)
    Your JPEG file is likely to have a compressed size of 3-5MB. Opening a JPEG in an image program such as Adobe Photoshop will show you the uncompressed/open file size.

Even though my original finished photos are saved as .tiff files and are huge, it seems like every time I save one to .jpg it winds up more often than not, LESS than 17 MB  when opened in PS. 

 

Am I saving it wrong? Is there anything I can do to remedy this, or is it a matter of, "it is what it is"?

 

Thanks in advance 

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17MB is the uncompressed size limit which is visible while the image is open in PS. Alternatively, as a simple guide, any image with more than about 6 million pixels e.g. 3,000 x 2,000 will be fine. When saving the compressed jpg from PS make sure the quality level is set to 10 or more. The jpg file on your disk will be much smaller as a result of jpg compression, but the pixel dimensions are retained.

 

If you want to learn more, search the forum for 17MB, there are plenty of similar posts with more details.

 

Mark

Edited by M.Chapman
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thank you. I know I'm still not quite understanding it, but I'll do what you suggested, Thanks again

 

edit: actually, "17 MB" isn't yielding me any results. So, when I go to open a shot in PS, , the shots I saved as .jpg are less than 17MB according to the menu, even if the .tiff versions are well over 100 MB.

 

Am I doping something wrong, or are these just unusable because they're too small?

Edited by Trelawny Welles
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12 minutes ago, Trelawny Welles said:

thank you. I know I'm still not quite understanding it, but I'll do what you suggested, Thanks again

 

edit: actually, "17 MB" isn't yielding me any results. So, when I go to open a shot in PS, , the shots I saved as .jpg are less than 17MB according to the menu, even if the .tiff versions are well over 100 MB.

 

Am I doping something wrong, or are these just unusable because they're too small?

 

Simply - export your JPGs at max quality, equivalent to or larger than 6MP (megapixels, not megabytes). At standard aspect ratio 6MP is 3000x2000 pixels, but you can always work out how many MP are in an image by multiplying the pixels. 3000 * 2000 is 6,000,000 pixels - 6MP.

Edited by Cal
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23 hours ago, Trelawny Welles said:

Hello, thanks for all the responses,. I was forced to put this on ther back burner until now, and now I'm back with another question. The guidelines for passing QC include

 

  • File size of over 17MB (when uncompressed/open)
    Your JPEG file is likely to have a compressed size of 3-5MB. Opening a JPEG in an image program such as Adobe Photoshop will show you the uncompressed/open file size.

Even though my original finished photos are saved as .tiff files and are huge, it seems like every time I save one to .jpg it winds up more often than not, LESS than 17 MB  when opened in PS. 

 

Am I saving it wrong? Is there anything I can do to remedy this, or is it a matter of, "it is what it is"?

 

Thanks in advance 

 

Are you exporting from the TIFFS to jpegs in Photoshop?   Make sure that the export isn't reducing the dimensions of the jpeg (I export from LR Classic and if something is for posting, the long dimension gets reduced, and if for Alamy, I uncheck that.  Also, as others have said, save at highest quality. 

 

Defaults need to be checked, also how do you save the TIFFS?  

 

 

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1 hour ago, Trelawny Welles said:

edit: actually, "17 MB" isn't yielding me any results.

Try 17MB (not 17 MB) as I suggested, with search in Everywhere ticked.

 

To check the uncompressed size of a jpg file in Photoshop.

  • Open the jpg file
  • Then using the Top menu select  Image>Image Size...
  • The image Size dialog will appear
  • The uncompressed size in MB is shown

Alternatively to display uncompressed size in MB size all the time, in the bottom LH corner of the screen in PS, click the > and select "Document size" option

 

Mark

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