Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This new 40 MP camera has been announced. I think it will be shipping in a couple of weeks. They’ve made this one more for stills rather than video, although it has video. The size is closer to the X-T1 instead of slowly getting a bit larger like the 2s through 4s. I’ll be interested in how it handles noise. My X-T4 handles it exceptionally well.

Betty

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

This new 40 MP camera has been announced. I think it will be shipping in a couple of weeks. They’ve made this one more for stills rather than video, although it has video. The size is closer to the X-T1 instead of slowly getting a bit larger like the 2s through 4s. I’ll be interested in how it handles noise. My X-T4 handles it exceptionally well.

Betty

 

 

big attraction for me is the Subject tracking autofocus  that was introduced with the X-H2s, and the battery (i'm still on XT3)

 

 Not enough to pre-order, still happy with my X-T3, but looking at how people will find it.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

45 minutes ago, meanderingemu said:

 

 

big attraction for me is the Subject tracking autofocus  that was introduced with the X-H2s, and the battery (i'm still on XT3)

 

 Not enough to pre-order, still happy with my X-T3, but looking at how people will find it.   

I jumped on the T-1 right after it was announced, but I have waited to see real time images and input from those early adopters since. I had the T-2, skipped 3 and got the T-4, which I’m happy with. My daughter has my T-2 now and I still have the T-1. I really like these cameras. I monitor the new cameras on the FujiX forum. Lenses, too. I have the 80mm macro, the 35mm 1.4, and the 18-135, 50-140, 100-400, 56, & 12-24.  I use the 18-135, 80, 35 & 100-400 the most. I gave my daughter my 18-55 to go with the T2.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see that they've abandoned the ability to have a battery grip accessory for this one, leaving that functionality to the X-H2S (and yet to be announced X-H2). I guess not many people used them, there's always plenty secondhand available. I've got one for my X-T2 and though I don't use it day to day it's very comfortable to use and those extra 2 batteries are nice to have on occasion, especially good for vertical shots of course. 

 

Really pleased with my X-T2, and with Fuji in general being a very early adopter of the original X100 (still going strong). After I'd had the X-T2 a few months I was a little surprised when the the ISO dial came off (or was it the shutter dial?). Anyway it is held on by 3 adhesive pads and I suspect that is fairly common for modern cameras where screws aren't always obvious. I pushed it firmly back on and have had no further problems.

 

More recently I was watching the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II on a big screen in our local town square. I was leaning on a wall to the right of the square to keep out of the way, just moving in to discreetly take pictures now & again. My X-T2 was on a shoulder strap with a metal Arca-style L-grip and the 18-55 'kit' lens, the lens had a filter fitted. It was slightly lodged on the sloping window ledge of a bank. When I moved away the camera stayed on the sloping ledge, the strap slipped from my shoulder, then the camera smashed to the ground. For a short while I became the centre of attention, the lens hood explosively smashed into 3 pieces across the York stone pavement slabs, and there was a very heavy sharp thunk from the camera itself. My neighbouring spectators were horrified. I made light of it of course, at the same time wondering how much it was going to cost to replace both the camera and the lens. 

 

So, long story short, and several weeks later. The lens hood saved the lens, and possibly helped to save the camera. The lens works perfectly, no cosmetic damage apart from a very slight dink to the front edge of the filter. I had to inspect the metal L-gip very carefully to find the point of impact, a tiny mark. The camera works perfectly and has no cosmetic marks at all. 

 

I was very lucky but clearly lens hoods, L-Grips and even filters also have a secondary role in protecting the camera.

 

 

Edited by Harry Harrison
  • Love 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Celluloid Hero said:

I have the X-T2 and have been really happy with it. Didn't even realise there was a 5 version until I read this post!

 

to be honest i think even most observers didn't expect it this year, especially with the X-H2S just being released. i only saw rumours floating a couple weeks ago.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, Harry Harrison said:

I see that they've abandoned the ability to have a battery grip accessory for this one, leaving that functionality to the X-H2S (and yet to be announced X-H2). I guess not many people used them, there's always plenty secondhand available. I've got one for my X-T2 and though I don't use it day to day it's very comfortable to use and those extra 2 batteries are nice to have on occasion, especially good for vertical shots of course. 

 

Really pleased with my X-T2, and with Fuji in general being a very early adopter of the original X100 (still going strong). After I'd had the X-T2 a few months I was a little surprised when the the ISO dial came off (or was it the shutter dial?). Anyway it is held on by 3 adhesive pads and I suspect that is fairly common for modern cameras where screws aren't always obvious. I pushed it firmly back on and have had no further problems.

 

More recently I was watching the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II on a big screen in our local town square. I was leaning on a wall to the right of the square to keep out of the way, just moving in to discreetly take pictures now & again. My X-T2 was on a shoulder strap with a metal Arca-style L-grip and the 18-55 'kit' lens, the lens had a filter fitted. It was slightly lodged on the sloping window ledge of a bank. When I moved away the camera stayed on the sloping ledge, the strap slipped from my shoulder, then the camera smashed to the ground. For a short while I became the centre of attention, the lens hood explosively smashed into 3 pieces across the York stone pavement slabs, and there was a very heavy sharp thunk from the camera itself. My neighbouring spectators were horrified. I made light of it of course, at the same time wondering how much it was going to cost to replace both the camera and the lens. 

 

So, long story short, and several weeks later. The lens hood saved the lens, and possibly helped to save the camera. The lens works perfectly, no cosmetic damage apart from a very slight dink to the front edge of the filter. I had to inspect the metal L-gip very carefully to find the point of impact, a tiny mark. The camera works perfectly and has no cosmetic marks at all. 

 

I was very lucky but clearly lens hoods, L-Grips and even filters also have a secondary role in protecting the camera.

 

 

My heart might not have survived an incident like that, Harry. It starts skipping around watching a football game I’m invested in. My camera? Heaven forbid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

My heart might not have survived an incident like that, Harry.

I can remember every time that I've accidentally dropped a camera in glorious technicolor, and slow-motion. I wish that was true of everything, or at least the good things.

Edited by Harry Harrison
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If that 40MP XT-5 sensor was scaled up to full frame it would be around 92MP, I wonder if that means that the MegaPixel race isn't over for full frame yet either, I think Sony is leading the pack with 61 MP at the moment.  The 25 MP Micro Four Thirds Panasonic GH-6 would be around 96 MP full frame, though around 85 MP if you cropped it to 3:2.

 

It does mean that lenses and technique will need to be top notch to get the most out of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pixel-peepers (and I admit to being one, at least from time to time) can find that DPReview have added a 'full production spec' 40MP X-H2 to their studio comparison, the 26MP X-T4 is also there, as is the 26MP X-H2S:

 

https://www.dpreview.com/news/1647199596/fujifilm-x-h2-added-to-studio-comparison-gives-insight-into-x-t5-iq

 

I have no intention of changing to full frame, or from Fuji in fact, but to me I don't think that the 40 MP APS-C sensor is getting much extra detail over the 26MP models from that comparison, they use the 56mm f1.2 lens for all of them I think. Full frame 35MP - 45MP sensors do better, but that's not unexpected. Way back on the slide-copying thread DDoug preferred to use the 24MP X-A5 (Bayer not X-Trans) for slide copying and that seems to do very well here also.

 

https://discussion.alamy.com/topic/12518-canon-slide-copying-set-up/page/30/#comment-257164

 

Edited by Harry Harrison
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the subject of toughness of Fujis, I was chased by a large, shaggy, semi-wild male Yak a couple of years ago in Nepal. The X-t2 with 16-55 2.8 was attached by cord to my bag and was dropped into the rocks in the race for high ground and dragged across the ground.  Polarizer smashed, a dinge in the filter thread and a chip out of the corner of the screen but no other harm done, all working fine still.

  • Love 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, geoff s said:

On the subject of toughness of Fujis, I was chased by a large, shaggy, semi-wild male Yak a couple of years ago in Nepal. The X-t2 with 16-55 2.8 was attached by cord to my bag and was dropped into the rocks in the race for high ground and dragged across the ground.  Polarizer smashed, a dinge in the filter thread and a chip out of the corner of the screen but no other harm done, all working fine still.

Shame there wasn't an insurance claim, I'd have paid good money to see the particulars. "Cause of damage- chased by a yak."😍

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hopefully this'll mean the X-pro 4 will be getting released soon. Admit to being a Fujifilm fanboy...and why not, great quality and design. 

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, Jay D said:

Hopefully this'll mean the X-pro 4 will be getting released soon. Admit to being a Fujifilm fanboy...and why not, great quality and design. 

Ah but have they yak-proofed it.

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 05/11/2022 at 02:55, Harry Harrison said:

I can remember every time that I've accidentally dropped a camera in glorious technicolor, and slow-motion. I wish that was true of everything, or at least the good things.

Isn’t those moments strange? My memory works like that, also. Slow-mo. After my back surgery and the first day I was transferred to a rehab facility, I fell while under strong drugs given to bear the pain of the move. I remembered getting out of bed and falling but it was hazy.

After coming home, when I finally was able to get off painkillers, my mind sharpened. 
Glorious slow motion, falling and doing the splits on the way down to the floor. I wasn’t supple enough to do that when young.  I had a torn thigh muscle from my groin to my knee that restricted movement & gave tremendous pain. Now I know how it happened.  My hazy memory only revealed the fall, not the leg splits.

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Said Yak seemed fairly happy till I pointed camera at him, then just as I was about to press the shutter I saw the head drop and a sprint start begin. I have a blurry picture with one hairy hind leg just leaving the edge of the frame.

Touchy beast the Yak.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.