Jump to content
  • 0
Sign in to follow this  
John Mitchell

Architectural ID?

Question

A couple of architectural detail questions that I'm hoping to get some help with:

 

Does anyone know what this style of of decorative masonry with bricks sticking out at right angles might be called? Vancouver houses built during Edwardian times sometimes sport chimneys like these. I've also seen this type of brickwork in exterior walls of old houses. 

 

red-brick-masonry-chimney-on-the-roof-of

 

 

Also, I have no idea what this steep-sided peaked roof might be called in the architectural world. It looks a bit like a witch's hat to me. Is it a type of cupola?

 

decorative-steep-sided-peaked-roof-of-a-

 

 

 

 

Edited by John Mitchell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

24 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Here's an interesting list of British bricklaying terms... the terminology may also apply in Canada.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_British_bricklaying

i'd guess the pattern up the corners of the chimney might be call 'dog tooth',
while the other bricks sticking out of the main faces might be described as 'decorative protruding headers' or 'decorative projecting headers'.

GD

 



 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Cupola, also turret. We have quite  few in East London. Also Edwardian generally.

These are in Herfordshire and East Yorkshire though.

BGE8X7.jpgH2HGTR.jpg

Edited by spacecadet
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
6 hours ago, Niels Quist said:

Presume you have been on these sites, you are the native, I am just a stupid Viking:

 

https://www.adrianarchitecture.org/glossary

 

https://www.vancouverheritagefoundation.org/house-styles/queen-anne-revival/

 

Thanks very much. I had forgotten about the Vancouver Heritage website. It looks as if the first one would be classed as a turret.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
5 hours ago, Gorilla Dave said:

Here's an interesting list of British bricklaying terms... the terminology may also apply in Canada.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_British_bricklaying

i'd guess the pattern up the corners of the chimney might be call 'dog tooth',
while the other bricks sticking out of the main faces might be described as 'decorative protruding headers' or 'decorative projecting headers'.

GD

 

 

Thanks. I'll have to work my way through that list. My grandfather was a bricklayer and stone mason from Cumbria. It seems that the gene didn't get passed on...

 

"Dog tooth" sounds good. I'll check it out further.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
4 hours ago, spacecadet said:

Cupola, also turret. We have quite  few in East London. Also Edwardian generally.

These are in Herfordshire and East Yorkshire though.

BGE8X7.jpgH2HGTR.jpg

 

Vancouver is a young city, so it doesn't begin to compare with London when it comes to historic architecture. However, the neighbourhood that I live in has a lot of large Edwardian era houses. Many have been remodelled FBFW and turned into condominiums. I actually live in one of the latter, built in 1912 I believe. Luckily, it retains most of its original architectural details.

 

Here's a cupola that has survived.

 

metal-cupola-with-a-finial-on-a-large-re

Edited by John Mitchell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
6 hours ago, Gorilla Dave said:

Here's an interesting list of British bricklaying terms... the terminology may also apply in Canada.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_British_bricklaying

i'd guess the pattern up the corners of the chimney might be call 'dog tooth',
while the other bricks sticking out of the main faces might be described as 'decorative protruding headers' or 'decorative projecting headers'.

GD

 

 

Looks like "dog tooth protrusions" and decorative protruding/projecting headers are the best descriptors. Think I'll go with those. Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I would keyword very specialized subjects like this also sort of backwards: first sift through AoA looking for search terms that might be applicable and then decide which to use. With the absolute perfect one in the caption. And maybe in the description as well to prove you know your stuff and the client can caption it confidently.

 

wim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I would think a dog tooth is a brick set at 45 degrees, either sticking out or in line. Also called a sawtooth. Maybe that's US.

A brick sticking out at 90 degrees is a dentil. However I have no idea what a corner like this is called. Mock Tudoresque?

 

Chimneys on Hampton Court Palace - Stock Image

BBJE2F  - The real thing. (not mine - wish it was)

 

Here some people still call a brick cut in a certain way a paardelul: horse dick. You call it a queen(s) closer. I know because we have (at least used to have) a prize in architecture the Golden P (=Paardelul) which is a golden or gold painted piece of brick. It's even funnier because the name givers got it wrong: it's actually called a stallion's dick (hengstelul) among Dutch bricklayers. But then it would not have been the alliteration we're so fond of. A paardelul is (now at least) the name for the poker vibrator for concrete.

The prize is for a really stupid architectural mishap. The British equivalent would be the Carbuncle Cup.

Oh and the official name of that cut brick is klisklezoor, which also very much sounds like a dirty word to most.

 

wim

Edited by wiskerke
deleted the soccer bit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, wiskerke said:

I would think a dog tooth is a brick set at 45 degrees, either sticking out or in line. Also called a sawtooth. Maybe that's US.

A brick sticking out at 90 degrees is a dentil. However I have no idea what a corner like this is called. Mock Tudoresque?

 

Chimneys on Hampton Court Palace - Stock Image

BBJE2F  - The real thing. (not mine - wish it was)

 

Here some people still call a brick cut in a certain way a paardelul: horse dick. You call it a queen(s) closer. I know because we have (at least used to have) a prize in architecture the Golden P (=Paardelul) which is a golden or gold painted piece of brick. It's even funnier because the name givers got it wrong: it's actually called a stallion's dick (hengstelul) among Dutch bricklayers. But then it would not have been the alliteration we're so fond of. A paardelul is (now at least) the name for the poker vibrator for concrete.

The prize is for a really stupid architectural mishap. The British equivalent would be the Carbuncle Cup.

Oh and the official name of that cut brick is klisklezoor, which also very much sounds like a dirty word to most.

 

wim

 

An Alamy search for "saw tooth" brings up this, which kinda makes sense. Similar search for "dog tooth brickwork" brings up something completely different.

 

Dentil looks a lot more organized than the chimney I photographed. Perhaps the bricklayer just had too many beers for lunch. 🍻

 

A daren't even search for "hengstelul". 😲

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by John Mitchell
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, John Mitchell said:

An Alamy search for "saw tooth" brings up this, which kinda makes sense. Similar search for "dog tooth brickwork" brings up something completely different.

 

Dentil looks a lot more organized than the chimney I photographed. Perhaps the bricklayer just had too many beers for lunch. 🍻

 

A daren't even search for "hengstelul". 😲

😂😂

 

You have 2 Alamy links that are the same I think.

 

As a check I just searched for brickwork or masonry + dentil or sawtooth or saw tooth or dog tooth on Google Images.

(We live in a very very modest 1927 version of Amsterdamse School building, a form of Brick Expressionism. So modest we have no expressionist brickwork.)

 

wim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
3 hours ago, wiskerke said:

😂😂

 

You have 2 Alamy links that are the same I think.

 

As a check I just searched for brickwork or masonry + dentil or sawtooth or saw tooth or dog tooth on Google Images.

(We live in a very very modest 1927 version of Amsterdamse School building, a form of Brick Expressionism. So modest we have no expressionist brickwork.)

 

wim

 

Yes, I screwed up the links. Think I had better play safe and stick with something like "red brick masonry chimney with decorative protruding bricks". I quite like the quirky  look of the chimney. Brick expressionism definitely isn't what it used to be...

Edited by John Mitchell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

- perhaps just a lazy bricklayer who didn't care to go all the way down to half the bricks who created a new style.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
9 hours ago, Niels Quist said:

- perhaps just a lazy bricklayer who didn't care to go all the way down to half the bricks who created a new style.

 

Could be the same bricklayer. There are three of these unusual chimneys near my place, all on houses built during the same time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
On 13/09/2020 at 03:42, wiskerke said:

😂😂

 

You have 2 Alamy links that are the same I think.

 

As a check I just searched for brickwork or masonry + dentil or sawtooth or saw tooth or dog tooth on Google Images.

(We live in a very very modest 1927 version of Amsterdamse School building, a form of Brick Expressionism. So modest we have no expressionist brickwork.)

 

wim

😛😛 Wim probably knows these.

H3E5E5.jpg

 

CTEM81.jpg

 

not (or perhaps) to be confused with Backsteingotik.......

C3TX47.jpg

Edited by spacecadet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

While we're on the subject of architecture, I was never sure how to describe this old window that I photographed in Montreal quite a long time ago. Any ideas? I guess it's a type of bay window --- "Box Bay Window" or "Triangle Bay Window" perhaps?

 

window-of-an-old-house-in-le-plateau-mon

 

 

Edited by John Mitchell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
5 hours ago, GeoffK said:

 

Interesting. This window is a bit unusual in that it actually has another window just like it on top of it -- i.e. there is no platform on top. The article that you linked to does say that Oriel windows are a type of bay window. I'll make sure both "bay window" and "oriel window" are in the keywords. Thanks. 

 

UPDATE: It looks a bit like these windows, but not as old or as ornate of course.

 

Judging by the platforms, these are probably Oriel windows (also in Montreal) as well by the sounds of it. No?

 

old-stone-buildings-on-crescent-street-i

Edited by John Mitchell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
7 hours ago, spacecadet said:

😛😛 Wim probably knows these.

H3E5E5.jpg

 

CTEM81.jpg

 

not (or perhaps) to be confused with Backsteingotik.......

C3TX47.jpg

 

Obviously you already know where these are. I recognized the ones from Cologne, but have not been to Rostock yet.

The Hansahochhaus certainly qualifies: build in 1924-25 with interesting details. And an interesting history.

The bricks are a bit deceptive: it's actually a steel and concrete building. Skyscraper even. The bricks are real, but used as outside wallpaper.

The same story it seems with the tower, some of us may remember it from visiting the PhotoKina in Cologne. The Rheinhallen next to it, where the Kina is held, date from the same year. Because the people from Cologne hated the concrete and steel industrial look of the new exhibition buildings, the bricks have been wallpapered on two years later by a new municipal architect who also added the tower in the same brick pattern. Now the town folk loved it, also because there was a restaurant on the top floor with great views over the city. Now closed which is a pity. Have a look at it's details here, especially the sculpture on the top: that pine cone/pineapple/grenade is a fish and stands for the Rhine. Also note the great pictures of the 2005/2006 renovation where they have kept the brick wallpaper, but removed the entire building on the inside.

 

The Maria church in Rostock looks the part, but is indeed actually quite old: It was ready by 1454, but they started building 200 years earlier. Albeit a smaller building as was often the case of course. Interesting fun fact: the smaller building was kept inside the new building for a long time and was the birthplace of the first German university on November 12 in 1419.

So it's the real thing: Backsteingotik, Brick Gothic.

Interesting is the role it played in the 1989 ending of the DDR, when the Wall came down. The Lutheran pastor at that moment was involved in the opposition against the regime and later became president of the re-united Germany from 2012 till 2017. Protests (of the peace movement, Friedensbewegung) against the DDR state always started at the church.

If you want to know what the DDR looked like, here's a 1989 TV news show from just weeks before the collapse.

 

Somehow I have still not visited this corner of Germany. From the west I have not traveled further than Kiel and Hamburg; from the other side, not further than about 75km north from Berlin and Potsdam. So about 180km from Rostock on both sides. That whole region is definitely on the list though.

 

wim

 

 

Edited by wiskerke
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
9 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Interesting. This window is a bit unusual in that it actually has another window just like it on top of it -- i.e. there is no platform on top. The article that you linked to does say that Oriel windows are a type of bay window. I'll make sure both "bay window" and "oriel window" are in the keywords. Thanks. 

 

UPDATE: It looks a bit like these windows, but not as old or as ornate of course.

 

Judging by the platforms, these are probably Oriel windows (also in Montreal) as well by the sounds of it. No?

 

old-stone-buildings-on-crescent-street-i

 

Hi John

 

IIRC, Bay windows are any that protrude even down to building ground level adding floor space to a room. An Oriel doesn't go to ground level - it is supported by a corbel (in the old days) of which you have a pair in your original question.

 

So both terms are good, one is generic, one specific.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
11 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

Obviously you already know where these are. I recognized the ones from Cologne, but have not been to Rostock yet.

The Hansahochhaus certainly qualifies: build in 1924-25 with interesting details. And an interesting history.

The bricks are a bit deceptive: it's actually a steel and concrete building. Skyscraper even. The bricks are real, but used as outside wallpaper.

The same story it seems with the tower, some of us may remember it from visiting the PhotoKina in Cologne. The Rheinhallen next to it, where the Kina is held, date from the same year. Because the people from Cologne hated the concrete and steel industrial look of the new exhibition buildings, the bricks have been wallpapered on two years later by a new municipal architect who also added the tower in the same brick pattern. Now the town folk loved it, also because there was a restaurant on the top floor with great views over the city. Now closed which is a pity. Have a look at it's details here, especially the sculpture on the top: that pine cone/pineapple/grenade is a fish and stands for the Rhine. Also note the great pictures of the 2005/2006 renovation where they have kept the brick wallpaper, but removed the entire building on the inside.

 

The Maria church in Rostock looks the part, but is indeed actually quite old: It was ready by 1454, but they started building 200 years earlier. Albeit a smaller building as was often the case of course. Interesting fun fact: the smaller building was kept inside the new building for a long time and was the birthplace of the first German university on November 12 in 1419.

So it's the real thing: Backsteingotik, Brick Gothic.

Interesting is the role it played in the 1989 ending of the DDR, when the Wall came down. The Lutheran pastor at that moment was involved in the opposition against the regime and later became president of the re-united Germany from 2012 till 2017. Protests (of the peace movement, Friedensbewegung) against the DDR state always started at the church.

If you want to know what the DDR looked like, here's a 1989 TV news show from just weeks before the collapse.

 

Somehow I have still not visited this corner of Germany. From the west I have not traveled further than Kiel and Hamburg; from the other side, not further than about 75km north from Berlin and Potsdam. So about 180km from Rostock on both sides. That whole region is definitely on the list though.

 

wim

 

 

Thanks, Wim. I didn't know about the after-the-fact cladding. Photokina was a regular gig for us from '98-2010 as I had a reporting commission from the trade press.. We still go to Köln every even-numbered year* because we got to like the city more than the show. Always a curry at the Ganesha and a good bit of Kölsch somewhere.

PTHTAB.jpg

 

We actually went to Rostock on a Baltic cruise on the Marco Polo. It's a train ride from the terminal at Warnemünde and well worth a visit of more than our few hours.

Of course the Marco Polo wasn't far from home as she was built at Wismar.

C3TXN7.jpg

*Except 2020, obvs. Germany was fine, but the ferry to France wasn't. So we lost our last chance to bring back a carload of Mosel Riesling.

2ABF4T6.jpg

Edited by spacecadet
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
8 hours ago, GeoffK said:

 

Hi John

 

IIRC, Bay windows are any that protrude even down to building ground level adding floor space to a room. An Oriel doesn't go to ground level - it is supported by a corbel (in the old days) of which you have a pair in your original question.

 

So both terms are good, one is generic, one specific.

 

Thanks again, Geoff. I gather that the curved bay windows below would be "Bow Windows". Correct? I don't seem to see any corbels, so I don't think they are Oriel.

 

victorian-era-romanesque-revival-style-p

Edited by John Mitchell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.