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I have these wildflowers identified as celandine poppies (Stylophorum diphyllum). Have I got it right?

 

yellow-celandine-poppies-or-woods-poppie

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No.  They're the Welsh poppy, Papaver cambricum (used to be Meconopsis cambrica but has recently been reclassified.  Include both in your keywords.).  If they're in your own garden keep picking off the spent flower heads and the plant will flower for most of the summer.  I've just spent ten minutes doing exactly that :)

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, John Richmond said:

No.  They're the Welsh poppy, Papaver cambricum (used to be Meconopsis cambrica but has recently been reclassified.  Include both in your keywords.).  If they're in your own garden keep picking off the spent flower heads and the plant will flower for most of the summer.  I've just spent ten minutes doing exactly that :)

 

Thanks. Are you sure? Welsh poppies was my first choice, but isn't North America out of their range?

 

The two species look the same to my untrained eye. :huh:

 

P.S. This bunch is still blooming along an alleyway behind our house.

Edited by John Mitchell

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52 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Thanks. Are you sure? Welsh poppies was my first choice, but isn't North America out of their range?

 

The two species look the same to my untrained eye. :huh:

 

P.S. This bunch is still blooming along an alleyway behind our house.

Definitely Welsh poppies.  Not a N.American native, but very easily grown from seed and a common garden plant in the Pacific North West, John.  Someone must have scattered some seed at some point and they've taken advantage.  I get seedlings cropping up everywhere in my own garden.  There are orange, red and double forms as well.  I've added a few images of the doubles to Alamy recently.

 

Methinks this is turning into a gardening forum :)

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invasive species keytag...big issue here right now...not with poppies, but with other plant species for sure...

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15 minutes ago, John Richmond said:

Definitely Welsh poppies.  Not a N.American native, but very easily grown from seed and a common garden plant in the Pacific North West, John.  Someone must have scattered some seed at some point and they've taken advantage.  I get seedlings cropping up everywhere in my own garden.  There are orange, red and double forms as well.  I've added a few images of the doubles to Alamy recently.

 

Methinks this is turning into a gardening forum :)

 

Thanks again for your expertise. Welsh poppies they must be. I just made all the caption and tag changes that you suggested. There are lots of these blooming around Vancouver right now. A Welsh invasion to follow perhaps? :o

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3 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Thanks again for your expertise. Welsh poppies they must be. I just made all the caption and tag changes that you suggested. There are lots of these blooming around Vancouver right now. A Welsh invasion to follow perhaps? :o

if it could be the Welsh rugby team, I'd be okay with it.

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My pleasure, John.  

 

They're a plant I wouldn't be without in my own garden.  Great for attracting insects as well. Taken in my garden.

 

Two male marmalade hoverflies, Episyrphus balteatus, feeding on pollen Stock Photo

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1 hour ago, John Richmond said:

My pleasure, John.  

 

They're a plant I wouldn't be without in my own garden.  Great for attracting insects as well. Taken in my garden.

 

Two male marmalade hoverflies, Episyrphus balteatus, feeding on pollen Stock Photo

 

Yes, I noticed that insects like them. I forgot this image also taken a couple of days ago. They look to be the Welsh poppies as well. Or something different perhaps?

 

bright-yellow-and-orange-wild-poppies-bl

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The bottom ones look like California poppies to me John.  But I'm not an expert.   Poppies are such interesting flowers and so many varieties are out right now.

 

Maria

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After I used up the tags flower and flowers, I'd be lost.  :wacko:

  • Upvote 1

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4 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Yes, I noticed that insects like them. I forgot this image also taken a couple of days ago. They look to be the Welsh poppies as well. Or something different perhaps?

 

bright-yellow-and-orange-wild-poppies-bl

California poppies for these ones.  Eschscholzia californica.  Annuals and available in various seed strains and colour forms.  Those look like the species.

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, John Richmond said:

California poppies for these ones.  Eschscholzia californica.  Annuals and available in various seed strains and colour forms.  Those look like the species.

 

Thanks again, poppy experts. Come to think of it, I've seen fields of poppies like these along the northern California coast, a truly magical sight.

 

So many poppies, so little time...

Edited by John Mitchell

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OK, one more poppy -- last one, I promise B)

 

I think it's a type of Shirley poppy. Yes? No?

 

Thanks again, experts.

 

close-up-of-a-pink-and-white-poppy-flowe

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Shirley you can't be serious.

I'll get my coat.

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14 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

Shirley you can't be serious.

I'll get my coat.

 

I'm always serious when it comes to poppies. :angry:

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It is indeed a semi double Shirley poppy.  The white centre (center) is characteristic of the true Shirley seed strains.

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29 minutes ago, John Richmond said:

It is indeed a semi double Shirley poppy.  The white centre (center) is characteristic of the true Shirley seed strains.

 

Thanks very much (once again), John.

 

Perhaps I'm actually getting better at this.

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