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Paulstw

Ever feel you're losing direction?

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In 2010 I moved out of the city and to the countryside. I bought a bridge camera to take nice pics of the views I had around me. That spiral ended up with me here today with about £2000 of equipment and a totally different direction. 

 

I quite like Alamy as it gives me a place where I can have a goal.

 

"Get so many images"
"Find a gap in a market"
"take better shots" 

 

However, sometimes I feel like everyone and their gran wants to get into photography, and "everyones doing it, so what makes you special" kind of thing. I traveled about 40 miles to get this shot, and to me its quite something, but without majorly over processing it, it kind of looks the same as everything else and I wonder if we're being numbed into a world where we don't really find much interesting anymore. 

 

9125587298_65a4816b99_c.jpg

 

 

I often think that the key to great photography is to convey the effort put in. I guess something that comes with time. For all anyone knows I could have taken this out my back garden and not 1800ft up a hill. :)

 

The other point to my thinking today is that it's all very well having a huge catalogue of images on Alamy, but how many of those images would you truly consider to be totally outstanding? and I think this is where a lot of "Why aren't my images selling" threads come from. If we don't have pride in our work (counting me in here) then how do we expect to sell anything? 

 

Having an off day....

 

Paul

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"I often think that the key to great photography is to convey the effort put in."

 

 

why?

the key to great image making is to convey a message/feeling/sensation/

 

whether that took you 400 miles or 400 yards is irrelevant

 

km

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If we don't have pride in our work (counting me in here) then how do we expect to sell anything? 

 

Can't but agree!

Pride in your work, and a constant eagerness to improve, that's what makes you stand out in the crowd (eventually). It's not the gear (I don't even want to start counting, but it's a 5 digit number), it's the eye and the mind.

 

Bjorn (in a bit of an "up" day, after shooting a great wedding on saterday ;-) )

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Whenever I feel the urge to be artistic I sit down with a nice cup of something until it goes away.

Edited by spacecadet
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Sadly my most creative images seem to be the ones that sell for the least amount and get plastered all over the internet.

However, when trying to work out why my landscape stuff is so rubbish I have come to the conclusion that it is because I can't be bothered to get up and trek 40 miles. Hats off to your input and you will eventually reap rewards for your efforts.

 

Andy

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"I often think that the key to great photography is to convey the effort put in."

 

 

why?

the key to great image making is to convey a message/feeling/sensation/

 

whether that took you 400 miles or 400 yards is irrelevant

 

km

 

Maybe in the sense of stock photography. Not everyone can see a message in an image or not every image needs a message. 

 

Maybe we all look at things a bit different. 

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I suppose like any profession, photography has its up and down periods. Sometimes I am completely motivated and dying to get out and take shots, usually after a sale has come in. Other days, like this morning, when I have processed shots from an event I attended on Saturday, I get very down when I realise that 90% of them are SOLD thanks to poor light and I may have 5 or 6 I can use on Alamy.

 

That said, I'd still much rather be doing this than worrying about project deadlines, peer reviews and offshore programmers, as in a previous existence.

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"Maybe in the sense of stock photography. Not everyone can see a message in an image or not every image needs a message."

 

but this is a stock library.....

 

km

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Philippe,

 

I suppose that you noticed that the link in Wikiwatsit produced two images which contained no IPTC whatever, so if I was the usual crook I would nick the image, and claim innocence because it contained no © information, and pay up the fee that it would have cost me to buy it legally if I was caught OR give it the requested by-line - OR get involved in time consuming legal stuff. The images are more than big enough for any web usage.......it is on my screen now, good quality,  and I didn't slip on the muddy path.......all I have to do in this case (it's Wikimedia Commons) is to give the photographer a credit line - nice one Saffron.....

 

Bit depressing, but in the spirit of the WWW after all.....

Edited by DavidC

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I often think that the key to great photography is to convey the effort put in. I guess something that comes with time. For all anyone knows I could have taken this out my back garden and not 1800ft up a hill. :)

I think the key is "simply" :D   working out what people want.  However there is something in this statement. So many people seem to think photography is just about pressing a button - that's why people don't want to pay for stock. If people realised the effort that goes into  creating even a small portfolio they might be happier to part with their money.

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Nothing wrong at all Philippe, but I thought you might share my concern that the images from 'Saffron' are free for use as long as he/she gets a by-line. I thought that it was clear in my posting that the images were Saffron - not Arterra - and that they were just in the link !

 

Wikipedia provides this 'commons' thing to make available 'free' images for the price of a by-line - the images are NOT © free the © still belongs to the photographer and as long as the conditions are met can be published for nothing.

 

It is a Direction that has a direct effect on the efforts that we put into our imagery - or can afford to......

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I've probably been banging on the wrong doors lately that's all. It's easier to shoot 'editorial' type stuff and hope for the best, that to pay real attention. I guess it goes back to having the time. You only get out what you put in and all that. 

 

I get about 800-1000 views a month, and maybe 2-3 zooms. It's actually laughable, but what do I expect from a library of 'quick snaps' while out walking... 

 

There is no truer critique than a hundred views/zooms and no sales - That's my quote lol 

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I would nick the image, and claim innocence because it contained no © information, and pay up the fee that it would have cost me to buy it legally if I was caught OR give it the requested by-line - OR get involved in time consuming legal stuff.

Actually that wouldn't wash with the Patents County Court. Judgments on the small claims track are starting to come through. Only UK, of course, but it's a start.

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The flags are even the right way up for a change.

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I would nick the image, and claim innocence because it contained no © information, and pay up the fee that it would have cost me to buy it legally if I was caught OR give it the requested by-line - OR get involved in time consuming legal stuff.

Actually that wouldn't wash with the Patents County Court. Judgments on the small claims track are starting to come through. Only UK, of course, but it's a start.

This would be a classic one for them - the photographer 'Saffron' only values his/her image at a flicker by-line - can't see the damages racking up much here. Innocence may be no defence (it always was) but how much is the value of a by-line to an amateur photographer. Regarding the PCC I haven't yet seen a full judgement  - only a preliminary - has any case been finalised Mark - I know you are watching this closely.

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I love the natural world...unfortuantely, so does everyone else :D

 

My most licensed image on Alamy is that of the front of a shop with people walking in and out of it.  My most viewed image is that of the sign of the shop.  The pretty stuff that's fun to look at and fun to shoot and has taken a lot of thought doesn't get licensed.  In fact, I've backed off of doing model shoots as well because that doesn't appear to get licensed  or viewed much either.

 

I think it's because the market is so saturated.

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Cheers for the tips everyone. I do enjoy the alamy experience, and the chat on the forums. Incedentally This is my most licensed image. One that I stopped and looked at then moved around till I got it right. I do remember saying. This tells a story.

 

http://www.alamy.com/image-details-popup.asp?imageid=a412d050-9e83-458e-9bfd-512dd9231827&srch=&Stamp=3

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"It's easier to shoot 'editorial' type stuff and hope for the best,"

 

 

which is a massive misunderstanding of how an editorial photographer works......

 

km

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I started off purely as a landscape photographer but ended up doing all sorts, outdoor activity stuff through to taking a picture of a pile of coins or one of myself driving a car at night..... anything. I like to have fun with the camera but now I try to find subject matter that will sell better. It doesn't mean I don't take sunsets on the tops of mountains, I still do it often but I try to add people in at times or enough of the surrounding landscape that will illustrate where I was and what it was like.... The feeling of being in the middle of nowhere with amazing views and having it all to yourself. That's often what my customers clients want to see. Something that might inspire them to do it...... as long as it's not the same time I'm up there..... they are all mine you know  :D

 

Here's a new one from this month. Summit of Robinson in Buttermere.

 

D9CF03.jpg

Edited by Duncan_Andison
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probably best deleting this awful reply...i wrote..

Edited by Paulstw
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I've probably been banging on the wrong doors lately that's all. It's easier to shoot 'editorial' type stuff and hope for the best, that to pay real attention. I guess it goes back to having the time. You only get out what you put in and all that. 

 

I get about 800-1000 views a month, and maybe 2-3 zooms. It's actually laughable, but what do I expect from a library of 'quick snaps' while out walking... 

 

There is no truer critique than a hundred views/zooms and no sales - That's my quote lol 

 

Quick walks can be good money earners. Think of all the magazines and walking holiday brochures etc. When I go out climbing, scrambling or walking I normally jog on a head or hang back to capture either my wife or other people scrambling over rocks etc with nice backdrops etc. They can be used to illustrate walks and places very nicely.

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not shootoing anyone down, just making some points.....

 

km

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"It's easier to shoot 'editorial' type stuff and hope for the best,"

 

 

which is a massive misunderstanding of how an editorial photographer works......

 

km

 

You might have 22107 photos on here mate, but that's a couple of times now you've shot me down. We're all learners here, and no-ones an expert on anything.

 

If you don't like what I write, then stay out of my thread.

Easy, easy - relax - KM is one of the most experienced editorial photographers operating regularly on Alamy - I had a few years at the 'News' game and 'hope for the best' is not how the top guys work - it really isn't. 

 

A hell of a lot of thought often goes into what appears to be a spontaneous shot - and while I agree that we are all still learning, some have a bit more experience than others....

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Within the last year, according to 'All of Alamy' stats:

 

"Landscape" as an individual search term was searched for 45 times.

"Car" as an individual search term was searched for 467 times.

 

That's a ten-fold demand for something you can find outside your front door.

 

Stock is not art, it's not even regular "photography". It's about the production of images that are useful to sell things, or in the case of editorial, to illustrate a point of view or concept. By all means shoot misty landscapes and arty scenes, but don't expect to make many sales.

 

J

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I must admit I have got to agree with what DavidC has written in the above post. With me being a newbie to alamy ( as I had previously been spending my time doing micro ) I tend to read and digest a lot of what the more experienced guys are writing on the forum, as between them they have a wealth of useful information and KM ( redsnapper ) is one that I watch and always take notice of.

 

 

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