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34 minutes ago, Cee Dee Dickinson said:

 

Thanks. That's what I figured as well. However, the leaf in my image is very "pointy' -- i.e. it as sharp, slender points -- which mad me wonder if it might be something else. That said, Norway maples are fairly common in Vancouver.

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Compared to some of my own leaves that I'd identified as Norway Maple and I'm confident with that assessment as well. Granted it's a fairly sharp one.

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1 hour ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Thanks. That's what I figured as well. However, the leaf in my image is very "pointy' -- i.e. it as sharp, slender points -- which mad me wonder if it might be something else. That said, Norway maples are fairly common in Vancouver.

A few hundred million years ago, before the seperation of the continents the area called Vancouver was a lot closer to Norway than it is now,  so seed distrubtion would have taken place.

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2 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

Thanks very much for the feedback. I'm going with Norway Maple. The Continental Drift theory sealed it for me. 🤠

Glad to be of assistance John. 

 

Edit to add:

 

Norway Maple has a green bud as in your image. Sugar Maple ( Canadian Flag)  have a brown bud.

Edited by Cee Dee Dickinson
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I'm still at the primitive stage of being about to distinguish between a tree, a bush, and a building. Is this lonely Liverpool leaf a Norway Maple too? 

 

2E1PN5N.jpg

Edited by Ed Rooney
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27 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

I'm still at the primitive stage of being about to distinguish between a tree, a bush, and a building. Is this lonely Liverpool leaf a Norway Maple too? 

 

2E1PN5N.jpg

Norway Maple turn the same colour as John's in autumn. Your leaf looks like it's from a  Red Maple.

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Edo's leaf looks like it could be an Acer rubrum liverpudlianus to me. 🍁

 

Seriously, Red Maple sounds like a good guess. Tough to tell though. Can you unfold the leaf in PS?

 

 

 

 

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On 11/01/2021 at 02:36, Ed Rooney said:

 

I'm still at the primitive stage of being about to distinguish between a tree, a bush, and a building. Is this lonely Liverpool leaf a Norway Maple too? 

 

2E1PN5N.jpg

 

Your leaf doesn't have the long pointy bits John's does.  It's just plain maple.

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On 10/01/2021 at 22:32, Cee Dee Dickinson said:

A few hundred million years ago, before the seperation of the continents the area called Vancouver was a lot closer to Norway than it is now,  so seed distrubtion would have taken place.


I’m sure you mean well but this is basically complete nonsense. You should probably stick to what you know (identification). Flowering plants did not evolve until about 130 million years ago. Continents have been merging and separating for some billions of years and continue to do so - that sentence about before the separation of the continents is meaningless. Norway Maple is native to what geologists call Eurasia (effectively Europe and Asia which are really a single giant continent geologically speaking) and was brought to the Americas by 17th century settlers according to Wikipedia. 

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15 minutes ago, MDM said:


I’m sure you mean well but this is basically complete nonsense. You should probably stick to what you know (identification). Flowering plants did not evolve until about 130 million years ago. Continents have been merging and separating for some billions of years and continue to do so - that sentence about before the separation of the continents is meaningless. Norway Maple is native to what geologists call Eurasia (effectively Europe and Asia which are really a single giant continent geologically speaking) and was brought to the Americas by 17th century settlers according to Wikipedia. 

 

Hi MDM

 

." All the analyses indicate that land plants first appeared about 500 million years ago, during the Cambrian period, when the development of multicellular animal species took off." Source Sciencemag.

The seperating of continents was of course a bit of fun.  European settlers are to blame for many things and this includes the Norway Maple being  in the region, and the name Canada. :)

Edited by Cee Dee Dickinson
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3 minutes ago, Cee Dee Dickinson said:

The seperating of continents was of course a bit of fun. European settlers are to blame for many things and this includes the Norway Maple being  in the region, and the name Canada. :)

So how can we tell when you're serious?

The name "Canada" comes from an indigenous word, not from "European settlers".

 

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1 hour ago, Cee Dee Dickinson said:

 

Hi MDM

 

." All the analyses indicate that land plants first appeared about 500 million years ago, during the Cambrian period, when the development of multicellular animal species took off." Source Sciencemag.

The seperating of continents was of course a bit of fun.  European settlers are to blame for many things and this includes the Norway Maple being  in the region, and the name Canada. :)

 

Land plants have been around a lot longer than flowering plants (angiosperms) of which maple is one. I believe that the angiosperms evolved during the Cretaceous (around 130 million years ago or so). Palaeontology was never my strong suit and I certainly would not argue the details of this with a palaeontologist. The thing with geology is that it is a continually evolving science. What was held as true yesterday may no longer be true today so it is important to check information properly, Anyway I can't help myself correcting false information whether it is in jest or not which is indeed hard to tell in this instance 😀.  

Edited by MDM
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41 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

So how can we tell when you're serious?

The name "Canada" comes from an indigenous word, not from "European settlers".

 

"French explorer Jacques Cartier named Canada after "kanata," the Huron-Iroquois word for settlement."

As you can see Jaques Cartier was not indigenous, he did not understand the indigenous  language.

Edited by Cee Dee Dickinson
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