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Screenshot/photo of website for archival?


BradleyPhoto
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I was randomly searching Alamy for places I intend to visit soon and came across an image, presumably a screenshot based on file size but perhaps a photo, of a website displaying an old map showing a former train station.

Image ID: 2A8TKMF

Is this sort of thing actually allowed? (Let alone would it actually sell).

There’s actually a notification on the photo saying prints can only be made for non-commercial purposes and surely selling on Alamy is a commercial purpose?
It’s from the national library of Scotland

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I don't see any attempt at deception, this is up to Alamy to decide, however I am pretty sure Calling out a specific contributor's work, including the Image ID, is likely not in line with the spirit of the Forum, so i would suggest removing the ID from the post

 

 

 

 

Edited by meanderingemu
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An OS map will be out of Crown copyright if it was published before 1970. What the website says about licensing won't apply- it may well apply to photographs on the site so it's just a generic message.

Strictly speaking it may be a breach of the NLS's copyright in the design of the header but a court might well decide that it wasn't a substantial part of the work.

1 hour ago, meanderingemu said:

this is up to Alamy to decide,

Alamy don't check for infringements. When you upload you warrant that you have permission, so uploading images where you don't is a breach of contract.

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2 hours ago, spacecadet said:

An OS map will be out of Crown copyright if it was published before 1970. What the website says about licensing won't apply- it may well apply to photographs on the site so it's just a generic message.

Strictly speaking it may be a breach of the NLS's copyright in the design of the header but a court might well decide that it wasn't a substantial part of the work.

Alamy don't check for infringements. When you upload you warrant that you have permission, so uploading images where you don't is a breach of contract.

Thank you. That’s exactly the informative answer I was looking for.

Cheers

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17 minutes ago, BradleyPhoto said:

Thank you. That’s exactly the informative answer I was looking for.

Cheers

Pleasure.

Interestingly, in 2015 the OS became a limited company so Crown copyright will no longer apply. Any maps produced now will be in copyright until 70 years after the death of the youngest contributor. Not relevant for any of us, unless you plan to live forever, but a little geekfact.

Edited by spacecadet
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2 hours ago, BradleyPhoto said:

I wonder why it was removed then given this!

 

 

I don't get it.

Firstly when a contributor wants to remove an image immediately, the route is through the contributor desk. Otherwise, after deleting it yourself, the image is still searchable at least with it's Alamy reg#.

Secondly: the copyright warning on screen in the image was about the contents of the website, which includes it's appearance and design. Not just about this particular map.

 

This applies to all screenshots of course. Which is why most people publishing screen shots on Alamy, do so with a personal, creative twist. Admittedly these personal creative twists are not that unique: the possibilities are a bit limited if you want keep the thing readable.

 

wim

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