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I'm only a few months into editing for stock, and frequently encounter something I have regarded as a problem, and try to correct.   I shoot a lot of images against bright blue skies.  Often, the tips of trees, where limbs and leaves tend to thin out, will end up being the blue of the sky, rather than their usual greens and browns. 

As I said, I've regarded this a a chromatic aberration (though technically it may not be that) and have tended to either "trim" the trees of the blue or, in thicker areas, use the clone stamp tool in PS to recolor the areas.  For this, I'll generally zoom in to 2:1.

 

But is it a problem?   Haven't run into a discussion of it before.  And if it is a problem (for Alamy QC, anyway), are there better methods of fixing it?

 

Thanks,

Michael

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I always worry about this but haven't had any issues with QC. They no doubt realize that the blue "bleeding" (for lack of a better word) and fading are often unavoidable. I don't think that it's CA. However, I'm no expert on technical stuff.

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I think this is a perfectly natural property of lenses and I usually don't worry about it. However, if I feel particularly concerned I generally try to use the manual adjustment in Lightroom to remove blue fringing.

 

Alan

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Sometimes I use selection point technology and desaturation to adjust to acceptable levels. It works quite well but can take a little time.

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I don't think you need to worry at all about blue fringing from sky against leaves for Alamy QC.

 

If it is lateral chromatic aberration then colour fringing will be most visible towards the edge of the frame and it won't be confined to trees. The best way to get rid of this is to use the tickbox in LR or ACR on the raw file. If that doesn't work fully which it may not, then the fringe removal tool as mentioned above can also be applied.

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3 hours ago, MDM said:

If it is lateral chromatic aberration then colour fringing will be most visible towards the edge of the frame and it won't be confined to trees. The best way to get rid of this is to use the tickbox in LR or ACR on the raw file. If that doesn't work fully which it may not, then the fringe removal tool as mentioned above can also be applied.

+1

 

Mark

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Thanks to all for responses and suggestions.   It appears each has found their own solutions, or dubbed it "not a problem", and their results have been successful.  Will continue my own search for what are acceptable corrections.

 

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