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For the edification of new people here, I just wanted to point out that my last four zooms the Latin, or scientific name, was the search term. For birds, and a tiny green bee. This is often the case for wildlife and plants.

That shows how important it is to have these tags. ‘small green bee’ wouldn’t have gotten me anywhere. Nor would ‘House finch’. I remember spending a couple of hours of research on that bee.

 

I think there is a lot of buyers that figure they can trust the information provided from us a little more when we use the Latin names, because they figure the ones who don’t might have even gotten the common name wrong since there wasn’t enough research done.

Betty

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Also, looking through Alamy's nature offering, inaccurate captions are so frequent (there was one on the Live News feed last night) that I think buyers hope that if someone has added the Latin name, there is a better chance that they have also identified the subject. 

The number of hoverflies labeled and bees or wasps.......

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I'll back Betty up here. 

 

36 searches using all or part of the latin name for me out of the 46 zooms generated in the last rolling month.  18 with the cultivar or variety name for the garden plants.  Ok, I'm a garden plant specialist and ecologist by training so it's easier for me but it does reinforce Betty's point about putting the research in to get the correct nomenclature for image keywording.  

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Gotta keep up with the changing scientific names on all species, animal and plant ... and vernaculars. Then will the searcher search on the old names or new names, so have to keep both up for a while ... then when they split species and one keeps the old name, have the buyers kept up ... Busy, busy! Have to admit I often don't realise a name has been changed for years. :blink:

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1 minute ago, Cryptoprocta said:

Gotta keep up with the changing scientific names on all species, animal and plant ... and vernaculars. Then will the searcher search on the old names or new names, so have to keep both up for a while ... then when they split species and one keeps the old name, have the buyers kept up ... Busy, busy! Have to admit I often don't realise a name has been changed for years. :blink:

+1.  Daisies are a nightmare!

 

Just spent the morning updating some of my plant shots with the latest name.  My biggest problem is that the nursery trade is both very conservative and always looking to relabel something to promote it.  So an old variety of garden plant gets a relaunch under a new variety name - but they retain the outdated Genus and species name. Aargh.

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