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Having changed from an EOS 6D and wide aperture prime lens system to a Sony A6000 f4.0 zoom lens based system, one of the down sides is I appear to be getting more images with signs of camera shake when taking walk around hand held photos. 

 

My current workflow is almost entirely based on LR5, and only moving to Photoshop Elements for  any cloning of objects larger than dust spots. 

 

Clearly I need to pay pay more attention to my technique, and I will do that, but I've noticed that the latest version of PS has a camera shake filter. Has anyone used this?

 

It seems to me that if it works, it would be useful to build it into my workflow for all hand held images. I assume that if a point of light moves say 10 pixels in 1/20 seconds, then it will still move 2 pixels in 1/100 seconds, and so a camera shake filter, if it works effectively, should sharpen up most hand held images. Any thoughts?

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I've used it a few times, and the images have passed. But the default is too strong, and can give halos, much like over sharpening. What I did was make a duplicate layer, apply the filter, use the opacity slider to reduce the effect. Even brush it off certain areas.

 

So tread very carefully with it.

Betty

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I would say this is something you could maybe use to rescue a shaky image but it should not become a regular part of your workflow. If camera shake is a problem, use the traditional solutions (faster shutter speed, camera-holding technique) unless it is a problem with the camera.

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Well you'd probably expect me to say don't add a processing step unless you really have to. You have Steady Shot helping you with the Sony as it is- I tested it initially and found it could help a bit. I just leave it on now

High-MP digital is just fussy on camera shake. You have to double the old lens/shutter speed reciprocal rule-of thumb at least. I would expect to lose a few below, even at, 1/60, even with a wide-angle.

Edited by spacecadet
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Yes to above.  If you have a really nice image, try it on an individual basis only, sparingly, and do not add it to your workflow automatically. Each image requires different handling/treatment/strength.

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Thanks for all of the interesting replies.

 

I think the main reason for the increased instance of camera shake is mainly due to the difference in shutter release between the Sony and the Canon. The Canon release is silky smooth, and Sony release is a bit more like a switch. I seem to be pushing against a resistance, which suddenly disappears. I just need to take more care all of the time, and not most of the time.

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Thanks for all of the interesting replies.

 

I think the main reason for the increased instance of camera shake is mainly due to the difference in shutter release between the Sony and the Canon. The Canon release is silky smooth, and Sony release is a bit more like a switch. I seem to be pushing against a resistance, which suddenly disappears. I just need to take more care all of the time, and not most of the time.

 

Interesting that you should have found that Ian. I have moved from a Canon 5D to a Sony NEX6 and have not noticed any particular problems with the Sony. Indeed the lack of a mirror has sometimes allowed me to take shots at slower speeds that I would have normally have attempted. That's not to say that I don't still ruin the occasional image due to shake; normally a golden opportunity that just springs up, and, in the heat of the moment, I tend to be a bit too enthusiastic with the shutter!

 

I normally use aperture priority and auto ISO if the light is good, but have found that it often pays to up the ISO if using a non stabilised telephoto, while for moving subjects I tend to use shutter priority, again with auto ISO. (I generally use manual lenses, so I also get to pick the aperture).

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A camera shake filter? This must be the digital equivalent of the 'in focus' print developer that the BJP annual used to give the formula for in the technical section at the back. If you had trouble holding the camera still and got a blurry neg, you just used this developer and, hey presto, a sharp print. 

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A camera shake filter? This must be the digital equivalent of the 'in focus' print developer that the BJP annual used to give the formula for in the technical section at the back. If you had trouble holding the camera still and got a blurry neg, you just used this developer and, hey presto, a sharp print. 

High acutance or April Fool?

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Can't remember the exact formula offhand but it was something to do with the ratio of the developing agents metol and hydroquinone with their catalyst, sodium carbonate. I think you also had to add a touch more anti-fogging agent - potassium bromide. Health warning here of course for male photographers handling pot. brom. Especially in the dark.

 

Don't recall the year this appeared but it may well have been the April 1st. edition. 

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