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Gott my X-T1 and grip today and I love the viewfinder.

 

 

I like the viewfinder too, but found out today that if the sun is coming from the side or slightly behind it blanks out the image in the viewfinder unless you have your eye pressed hard up to the camera. Maybe an eyecup would be a good idea?

 

Allan

 

 

Allan, Fuji have just announced a number of new X-T1 accessories and one of them is a new Eye Cup. If you scroll down this linked page you will see it. I think I'll be getting one of these when they are out!!

 

 

Thanks for the heads up Duncan. Looked on Fuji website where they do mention the new items but they are not on sale on their site yet.

 

Will definitely be getting one of the new eyecups.

 

Allan

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I don't quite understand the part about quick release.  What do you all take from the info?  A dovetail quick release as part of the hand grip?  To fit into what? I don't see them listing the part that goes on the tripod.

It fits into the Arca Swiss type tripod heads and works a treat.

 

Pearl

 

 

Thank you, Pearl.

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Just took my X-T1 out to the white water canoe course here in Nottingham as a first test of its suitability for sport. I was very pleased, the viewfinder and basic operation is plenty good enough for white water canoeing in good light (unlike the X-E1). It is not an especially challenging subject for autofocus so I will need to find some football (soccer) and ideally basketball to see how it copes with more erratic motion. I suspect I could use the X-T1 with most sports, might need to refine my technique slightly but I have had to do that with every camera change in the past and I have been shooting sport for nearly 40 years. Just needs some faster, longer lenses but I could cover many with the18-200mm (28-300mm 135 equiv) coverage that I have. Roll on the superzoom at the end of the year - I have started saving.

 

One thing that took me by surprise was the sound it made when shooting sequences. I am used to a full-frame dslr with lots of mirror and shutter noise with viewfinder blackout during exposures. The X-T1 just made a strange (to me) clicking noise with no blackout, so unobtrusive it took me a moment to realise that was the camera operating! Sounds like an electrical relay clicking in and out.

 

ND180047.JPG

X-T1 and 55-200 zoom at 164mm - 1/512 @ f5.7 ISO200. Canoeing is not a sport I have shot much so I need some practice before I really begin to read what is happening. Framing is not quite as tight as it looks, there will be a clear margin above his head when I process it properly.

Edited by Martin P Wilson

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Just took my X-T1 out to the white water canoe course here in Nottingham as a first test of its suitability for sport. I was very pleased, the viewfinder and basic operation is plenty good enough for white water canoeing in good light (unlike the X-E1). It is not an especially challenging subject for autofocus so I will need to find some football (soccer) and ideally basketball to see how it copes with more erratic motion. I suspect I could use the X-T1 with most sports, might need to refine my technique slightly but I have had to do that with every camera change in the past and I have been shooting sport for nearly 40 years. Just needs some faster, longer lenses but I could cover many with the18-200mm (28-300mm 135 equiv) coverage that I have. Roll on the superzoom at the end of the year - I have started saving.

 

One thing that took me by surprise was the sound it made when shooting sequences. I am used to a full-frame dslr with lots of mirror and shutter noise with viewfinder blackout during exposures. The X-T1 just made a strange (to me) clicking noise with no blackout, so unobtrusive it took me a moment to realise that was the camera operating! Sounds like an electrical relay clicking in and out.

 

ND180047.JPG

X-T1 and 55-200 zoom at 164mm - 1/512 @ f5.7 ISO200. Canoeing is not a sport I have shot much so I need some practice before I really begin to read what is happening. Framing is not quite as tight as it looks, there will be a clear margin above his head when I process it properly.

 

Good feedback on sports use. I agree with the noise vol of the XT1, even at high speed shooting. It's a robust sound, i.e. not rattly but quiet.... like a dampened click. I've even managed to get good keeper rates tracking a small fast moving puppy..... once I get that focus box over the little bug***, it does really well! Larger moving objects are far easier....... must feed him more so grows faster  :D

 

Some faster long lenses from Fuji would be good! For instance, not just wide apertures but fast silent motors in them as well. Still waiting on some more concrete rumours regarding the focal length of that Super Zoom!

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I shot about 100 images and threw away 35, mostly for composition failures - arm in front of face, important bits out of frame and perhaps just 6 due to being slightly soft. It is not bad rate (not all strictly keepers tho') and bear in mind this is not a sport I am particularly familiar with so I would expect a higher failure rate than with say, motor sport, need to refine specific aspects of my technique and ability to read what is happening.

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Hmmm....my experience is that the 55-200 tends to focus hunt and is slower to focus for sports and action - especially compared to a Canon 70-200 f/2.8.

 

I am waiting until the faster version of the lens comes out (scheduled for later this year).

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Hmmm....my experience is that the 55-200 tends to focus hunt and is slower to focus for sports and action - especially compared to a Canon 70-200 f/2.8.

 

I am waiting until the faster version of the lens comes out (scheduled for later this year).

 

The 2.8 50-140 weather sealed lens? That could be a very interesting lens although it is likely to be bigger/heavier.

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Hmmm....my experience is that the 55-200 tends to focus hunt and is slower to focus for sports and action - especially compared to a Canon 70-200 f/2.8.

 

I am waiting until the faster version of the lens comes out (scheduled for later this year).

 

So am I Ed, the news lenses at the end of the year look right up my street, I'll live with the extra bulk, they will be smaller than my FF Canon equivalents!

 

That said I have experienced very little hunting with the X-T1, the X-E1 and 55-200 would sometimes hunt even in bright light.

Edited by Martin P Wilson

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B&H sent a 3rd email advising me my order was still out of stock.  I contacted Berger Bros, and the next day Lisa called me and said one of the kits had come in and I shall have it, and the 10-24 this coming Tuesday. I'm on the list for the 56mm.

At last I'll have the camera and two lenses to play with which will do me fine while waiting for the 56.  Of course, I took a bit of pleasure out of calling B&H and canceling my order.  I might have stuck with them if I'd had good customer service when I called and inquired about my order and got "nothing".  If they could have told me "you are 5th down from the top of the waiting list" I might have hung in.  No, a brush off, and generic emails. It's not as if I were calling every day, I called once, at the 3 week mark.

 

Betty

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I promised to share how the X-T1 worked with football (soccer) and had chance this afternoon. I have thrown away 60% already and more will follow but I am  inexperienced shooting football (never have seriously and it is 10 years since I shot any at all). So my failure rate was at least as much due to my skills as the camera; many were simple framing mistakes because I did not read the game. I think with greater familiarity with both the X-T1 and football I will get a much higher hit rate.  Also I wouldn't be surprised to see a firmware update that refines the continuous focus algorithm. I was shooting (shutter priority) at around 1/500 f5.6-8 on ISO400 - 55-200mm mostly at the long end and I was using the vertical grip.

ND260017.jpgND260073.jpg

 

Both images are from high-speed sequences. I did find the lag of the evf a little offputting at times but I suspect there may have been some finger trouble to start with as it seemed to get better. I would tend to use manual exposure as auto-exposure (shutter priority) locks on first pressure on shutter so as you follow the action it does not change even though focus does. I need to get in tune with the different response of the X-T1 and I am sure that will produce better results.

 

Would I choose the X-T1 for sport, probably no , not yet but it is getting close. But that said I would not be unduly worried if I needed to use it. I suspect I would have few problems with motorsport (except for the lack very long lenses) as most of the motion is more predictable. Let's see by the end of the summer. That said I would be very reluctant to invest in a new DSLR at the moment but I won't be selling my kit, yet - this time next year who knows?

 

And I lost the rubber plug on the flash socket (hate those) :angry: May be replaced with a circle of gaffer tape or I glue the replacement in!

Edited by Martin P Wilson

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While waiting, every day seems to have 48 hours. :)

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All this is very interesting and informative, especially as, when the price falls, I intend to purchase an X-T1. Currently I use an X-E1, superb camera and currently selling s/h at peanut prices owing to the plethora of new models hitting the market.

 

No-one as yet has mentioned the use of grad.filters. When I used my long gone Canon 5DMk2 there was an aperture stop down button in order to check the depth of field . It also enabled one to see exactly where the dividing line was on a grad . filter. I suppose the only way to see the effect now is to  put the filter in place, make an exposure and assess the result on the 'guess' on the screen. If this is the case then it all seem very amateurish, please give me back my stop down facility. 

 

Brian

Edited by Brian Lawrence

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All this is very interesting and informative, especially as, when the price falls, I intend to purchase an X-T1. Currently I use an X-E1, superb camera and currently selling s/h at peanut prices owing to the plethora of new models hitting the market.

 

No-one as yet has mentioned the use of grad.filters. When I used my long gone Canon 5DMk2 there was an aperture stop down button in order to check the depth of field . It also enabled one to see exactly where the dividing line was on a grad . filter. I suppose the only way to see the effect now is to  put the filter in place, make an exposure and assess the result on the 'guess' on the screen. If this is the case then it all seem very amateurish, please give me back my stop down facility. 

 

Brian

 

Brian,

 

On the X-T1 the exposure shown in the viewfinder or on screen is (usually, can be changed) the exposure that will be recorded (as it is with the X-E1) so you will see the lighting effect of the filter which is surely the point. With the X-T1you can also zoom in using the focus assist button; I don't have my X-E1 to hand to see whether you can zoom the image to aid focus. Seeing what is actually going to be recorded is extremely valuable in low light. Inside dark buildings using high ISO I can often see more through the camera than with the naked eye - it is almost acting as a night scope but in full colour.

 

The X series seem to stop down on first pressure on the shutter in any case, everything seems to be done at the taking aperture.

 

So you are well covered for assessing a grad filter, exposure etc in the viewfinder or on screen.

Edited by Martin P Wilson

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I was just thinking about how and when I will use the vertical grip and it struck me: Why didn't they put a second card slot in there as well?

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The X series is getting better. Fuji Rumors has just updated the lens roadmap.

 

16mm f1.4 is the mystery fast wide angle (I might go for that rather than 14mm or 10-24mm)

120-400mm for the superzoom, if it is fast focussing it will be just what I hoped for most outdoor sports I cover especially motorspsort.

and the 18-135mm water-resistant gets fasts at f4.8 instead of f5.6 at the long end. It could be the ultimate travel/ walk around lens if it is as good as the 18-55/55-200mm combination.

 

I will be really interested to see how fast the new fast lenses will focus; I have a sneaking feeling that much of the AF limitation may be down to the current lenses especially the 55-200mm. I have no evidence, just a suspicion. I need to try the 18-55mm on a suitable sport; basketball would be good if I can find any locally - anybody tried it?

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I spent last week walking around Nashville, Tennessee with the XT-1 as well as the 18mm prime and 35mm prime and the 18-55.  I took the 55-200 but it didn't leave my bag.

 

As usual, the 35mm was exceptional.  I got some really great low light images.  The 18mm is still just OK.  I need to upgrade this lens to something just a tad faster. 

 

The 18-55 left me with mixed feelings.  I thought it was great during the day but in low light, it just wasn't fast enough for me.  It's for that reason I am going to pass on the 10-24.  I know it's just me and my preferences as it's a great lens but when trying to shoot neon signs at 55mm at the fastest aperture, I was getting some very slow shutter speeds.  I did not have a tripod with me (couldn't fit it in my carry on bag).

 

One thing I noticed with the body is that focus refinement doesn't seem to happen until the 2nd or 3rd shot for some reason.  I would capture an image on single focus setting, and shoot twice.  It seems 9 times out of 10, the second shot was in focus and the first was not.  I'm not sure what that's about and I'll have to play with it a bit more.  I have plenty of SD cards so I could set it to continuous focus and multiple shots per second but again, that's not how I normally shoot.

 

I also noticed after changing lenses from the 18-55 to a prime, the camera starts focus hunting for no reason - as if it was set to continuous focus.  I adjust from single focus to continuous focus back to single focus again and no problem.

 

All in all, I am really enjoying the kit.  Definitely much lighter and less intimidating to people on the street when you're using it over a DSLR.

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The X series is getting better. Fuji Rumors has just updated the lens roadmap.

 

16mm f1.4 is the mystery fast wide angle (I might go for that rather than 14mm or 10-24mm)

120-400mm for the superzoom, if it is fast focussing it will be just what I hoped for most outdoor sports I cover especially motorspsort.

and the 18-135mm water-resistant gets fasts at f4.8 instead of f5.6 at the long end. It could be the ultimate travel/ walk around lens if it is as good as the 18-55/55-200mm combination.

 

I will be really interested to see how fast the new fast lenses will focus; I have a sneaking feeling that much of the AF limitation may be down to the current lenses especially the 55-200mm. I have no evidence, just a suspicion. I need to try the 18-55mm on a suitable sport; basketball would be good if I can find any locally - anybody tried it?

 

The superzoom is the answer to my prayers.  Rumors were that it would be 300mm at the long end, which isn't long enough to suit me for birds, etc. I wanted 400mm. Looks like I will get it eventually.  That is the finishing piece for me. Wowza!

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I spent last week walking around Nashville, Tennessee with the XT-1 as well as the 18mm prime and 35mm prime and the 18-55.  I took the 55-200 but it didn't leave my bag.

 

As usual, the 35mm was exceptional.  I got some really great low light images.  The 18mm is still just OK.  I need to upgrade this lens to something just a tad faster. 

 

The 18-55 left me with mixed feelings.  I thought it was great during the day but in low light, it just wasn't fast enough for me.  It's for that reason I am going to pass on the 10-24.  I know it's just me and my preferences as it's a great lens but when trying to shoot neon signs at 55mm at the fastest aperture, I was getting some very slow shutter speeds.  I did not have a tripod with me (couldn't fit it in my carry on bag).

 

One thing I noticed with the body is that focus refinement doesn't seem to happen until the 2nd or 3rd shot for some reason.  I would capture an image on single focus setting, and shoot twice.  It seems 9 times out of 10, the second shot was in focus and the first was not.  I'm not sure what that's about and I'll have to play with it a bit more.  I have plenty of SD cards so I could set it to continuous focus and multiple shots per second but again, that's not how I normally shoot.

 

I also noticed after changing lenses from the 18-55 to a prime, the camera starts focus hunting for no reason - as if it was set to continuous focus.  I adjust from single focus to continuous focus back to single focus again and no problem.

 

All in all, I am really enjoying the kit.  Definitely much lighter and less intimidating to people on the street when you're using it over a DSLR.

 

Interesting about the lens change, sounds as though that is a firmware glitch, something not getting reset when lens changed. No doubt there will be a firmware update before too long, Fuji seem to be on the ball on  that front.

 

I have used the 18-55 in some very poor lighting (local music venues, churches) and I just up the ISO - I am pretty relaxed about using ISO1600; I am very wary about using it on my Canon 1Ds3 unless there was absolutely no alternative so I took a bit of convincing before I settled to using it routinely on my X-E1 (and now X-T1).

 

Like you I love the reduced weight as does my neck and my chiropractor!

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Betty, I think the finishing piece for me would be a 1.4x matched teleconverter for that superzoom, then I could even cover professional cricket with it (fast focus is not really an issue there). Be interesting to see what the max aperture range will be (hope no slower than f4-5.6 like the Canon but it would be quite a hefty lens).

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All this is very interesting and informative, especially as, when the price falls, I intend to purchase an X-T1. Currently I use an X-E1, superb camera and currently selling s/h at peanut prices owing to the plethora of new models hitting the market.

 

No-one as yet has mentioned the use of grad.filters. When I used my long gone Canon 5DMk2 there was an aperture stop down button in order to check the depth of field . It also enabled one to see exactly where the dividing line was on a grad . filter. I suppose the only way to see the effect now is to  put the filter in place, make an exposure and assess the result on the 'guess' on the screen. If this is the case then it all seem very amateurish, please give me back my stop down facility. 

 

Brian

 

Looking through the menus while on a job I saw that there is an option to enable depth of field preview, I think you can assign it to one of the Fn buttons. I didn't have time to try it as I was working on something else.

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It might be hefty, Martin, but never as hefty as my D800 and 80/400.  That is hefty.  Look in the dictionary under "hefty" and you will see that combo. :)

Edited by Betty LaRue

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It might be hefty, Martin, but never as helfty as my D800 and 80/400.  That is hefty.  Look in the dictionary under "helfty" and you will see that combo. :)

I know what you mean. I have used a Canon 100-400 f4-5.6 for motorcycle racing (occasionally with a TC, even from trackside) on a Canon 1Ds3. Similarly substantial and heavy.

 

Even a Fuji XF lens of similar range will not be small but hopefully will be quite a bit lighter (than the Canon/Nikon equivalents) and somewhat slimmer even if front element is as big (physics requires it). It may still dwarf the X-T1.

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Hey XT1 lovers,

 

Just wondering at some point....those that shoot full frame if you can do a side by side comparison for an action type shot Fuji vs YOUR FULL FRAME with comparable mm primes and another for a night shot.

 

I'm anxious to see comparison results!

L

Edited by Linda

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Hope that your long lens will be substantially smaller than the same item made for a DSLR are misplaced - it's likely to be about an inch longer physically, as there is no benefit to the slimmer body any lens much over a kit zoom. There are definite benefits when designing faster lenses like the 56mm, and anything shorter, but really nothing can be gained for a 120-400mm or similar lens. If it's light, that will only be because it is limited to APS-C, and with Fuji apparently planning a full frame model I assume the long zoom would be capable of FF coverage.

 

Sony is to release a 250mm f/5.6 for mirrorless (full frame) which may be the first stabilised mirror lens made. I'm getting the Tamron 150-600mm today (review, not buying) and it is coming in Canon mount. To enable its use I've got a Vitrox EF to NEX adaptor on the way (the Metabones III is no doubt better but £350 is rather steep when I have no other EF lenses and don't like Canon EF lenses much anyway). The adaptor will allow me to test future EF mount lenses, like the Sigma 24-105mm and 50mm f/1.4, on the 36 megapixel A7R sensor.

 

However, there's very little point in even the A7R for tele work, or indeed in a Fuji X body. You could be lugging a 400mm range lens round trying to get the right capture on 16 megapixels when it would be far cheaper, and much lighter on the shoulders, to use a 300mm and get a 24 megapixel body like the A6000 (or a used NEX-7 as they go pretty cheaply now). In my case, maybe a SLR/SLT body for the long lens. Got the Nikon D5300 here again for a few days, this time with its new lightweight much smaller 18-300mm f/3.5-6.3 VR lens - the one released last summer was a much bigger 18-300mm f/3.5-5.6. Not tested it yet but if the 300mm end is respectable at f/8 this will be a great travel combo. Got to remember that 300mm on 24 megapixels is equal to 375mm on 16 megapixels.

 

There is one telephoto solution I am waiting to test. This is the Nikon 1 V3 (18 megapixels on 1" sensor) with either its own native 18-300mm, or an adaptor and any lens over 300mm. I already wrote up in the April issue of f2 Freelance Photographer, with some images, my experience with the V2 and 18-300mm - equivalent focal length 810mm, highly effective VR, lightning fast AF which is also very accurate, and good file quality at the sort of 200-400-800 ISO speeds needed.

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