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Lightroom Exporting of Large JPEG Files


Pete Adams
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6 minutes ago, Pete Adams said:

 export uncompressed JPG from PS instead of LR?

In terms of exporting files there's no such thing- jpeg is a compressed format. Harry is referring to the uncompressed size when a jpeg is opened for viewing, not the file size on disk.

You can batch export jpegs from LR- I used to find it handier than PS. So much so that I stopped using PS years ago.

You may find that you need to do some more homework on the terminology- a lot of newcomers to digital imaging have misconceptions such as yours.

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14 minutes ago, Pete Adams said:

Do I have to export uncompressed JPG from PS instead of LR?

Yes, Spacecadet is right. If you have a Canon 6D Mk1 then the uncropped size is 5472 x 3648 pixels so you would need to crop or downsize a great deal to worry about them being too small. 17.2MB uncompressed equates to very slightly under 3000 x 2000 pixels and has nothing to do with the size of your files on disk. You simply need to export your jpegs at the highest quality setting and upload them to Alamy. I would recommend setting up an export preset in LR to do so. Your first 3 images MUST have the full EXIF metadata and just choose some undemanding images (standard ISO, no noise, SHARP, absolutely no dust spots etc.  Yes, it would be a good idea to familiarise yourself with the terminology.

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4 hours ago, Harry Harrison said:

Yes, Spacecadet is right. If you have a Canon 6D Mk1 then the uncropped size is 5472 x 3648 pixels so you would need to crop or downsize a great deal to worry about them being too small. 17.2MB uncompressed equates to very slightly under 3000 x 2000 pixels and has nothing to do with the size of your files on disk. You simply need to export your jpegs at the highest quality setting and upload them to Alamy. I would recommend setting up an export preset in LR to do so. Your first 3 images MUST have the full EXIF metadata and just choose some undemanding images (standard ISO, no noise, SHARP, absolutely no dust spots etc.  Yes, it would be a good idea to familiarise yourself with the terminology.

 

+ make sure your JPEGs are saved at Baseline (Standard).

(Not Baseline Optimized or Progressive.)

This is not in the guidelines any more, but I'm pretty sure it still applies.

 

wim

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37 minutes ago, wiskerke said:

 

+ make sure your JPEGs are saved at Baseline (Standard).

(Not Baseline Optimized or Progressive.)

This is not in the guidelines any more, but I'm pretty sure it still applies.

 

wim

 

 

Baseline Standard is hidden in the Blog... To Quote Arthur Dent "It was on display at the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying beware of the leopard."

 

 

 

https://www.alamy.com/blog/your-most-asked-alamy-quality-control-questions

 

"When sending my images to you, is there anything else I need to consider when submitting?

If you’re using the Online Upload Tool, save your files as “Baseline (“Standard”)” to minimise processing errors. Also, save at JPEG Level 8 – we’ve done a lot of research into image compression formats. While there are no distinguishable differences in image quality between a file saved at level 10 and one saved at level 8, your files will upload much more quickly."

 

 

Stay safe 😉

 

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36 minutes ago, Mr Standfast said:

While there are no distinguishable differences in image quality between a file saved at level 10 and one saved at level 8, your files will upload much more quickly."

I've always done that myself but never realised it was officially endorsed by Alamy, didn't like to suggest it to the OP but it's definitely worth doing.

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9 hours ago, Mr Standfast said:

https://www.alamy.com/blog/your-most-asked-alamy-quality-control-questions

 

"When sending my images to you, is there anything else I need to consider when submitting?

If you’re using the Online Upload Tool, save your files as “Baseline (“Standard”)” to minimise processing errors. Also, save at JPEG Level 8 – we’ve done a lot of research into image compression formats. While there are no distinguishable differences in image quality between a file saved at level 10 and one saved at level 8, your files will upload much more quickly."

 

I notice this blog dates from 2015.

Files will certainly upload quickly, but to state there's no distinguishable difference between level 8 and 10 certainly isn't true when using PS. Edges and skies will become slightly more "blocky" when inpected at 100%. Luckily no where near as bad as the banner image above the blog though, which is just awful...  Kind of ironic for a blog on image QC... :wacko:

 

However, I notice that the full res jpg image I puchased from Alamy (as part of my sRGB versus aRGB testing) appears to be compressed to about PS Level 8. It was uploaded at Level 10. If Alamy are compressing all uploaded images to Level 8, there's not much point in uploading at a higher level in sRGB. (It might be worth using above level 8 if uploading AdobeRGB to give better fidelity data for Alamy's AdobeRGB to sRGB conversion).

 

Mark

 

 

Edited by M.Chapman
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39 minutes ago, M.Chapman said:

I notice this blog dates from 2015.

Files will certainly upload quickly, but to state there's no distinguishable difference between level 8 and 10 certainly isn't true when using PS

It was updated in January 2020 but probably not in this respect. I suspect that the author, like me, wasn't thinking clearly and meant to save at Q10 instead of Q12 rather than Q8 instead of Q10. Lightroom goes up to 100, not 10 as I had remembered. Underlying that apparent precision is in fact the same 13 step range as Photoshop but without the extra refinement (complexity) of choosing between baseline standard and optimised or progressive. Checking my Alamy export preset I see I used 80% in Lightroom, which corresponds to the Q10 step in Photoshop.

Edited by Harry Harrison
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