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John Mitchell

Another flower ID

Question

Does anyone know what this flower might be?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

closeup-of-a-red-flower-2C22ETW.jpg

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I don't think it's a rugosa. The indents at the petal tips suggest Rosa moyesii, probably 'Geranium', commonly grown for the decorative autumn hips.

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8 minutes ago, John Richmond said:

I don't think it's a rugosa. The indents at the petal tips suggest Rosa moyesii, probably 'Geranium', commonly grown for the decorative autumn hips.

See what you mean about the indents; definitely suggests moyesii.  

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1 hour ago, John Richmond said:

I don't think it's a rugosa. The indents at the petal tips suggest Rosa moyesii, probably 'Geranium', commonly grown for the decorative autumn hips.

 

Thanks. I checked out online photos of Rosa moyesii, and it looks like that's it. Is it OK to call it a "geranium" as some sites call it a wild rose? Perhaps "Geranium" just refers to the red colour.

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Just now, John Mitchell said:

 

Thanks. I checked out online photos of Rosa moyesii, and it looks like that's it. Is it OK to call it a "geranium" as some sites call it a wild rose? Perhaps "Geranium" just refers to the red colour.

 Rose moyesii 'Geranium' is the commonest variety, John.  I think it's safe to include that in your caption and keywords.  It is a wild rose - but a selected form.

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14 minutes ago, John Richmond said:

 Rose moyesii 'Geranium' is the commonest variety, John.  I think it's safe to include that in your caption and keywords.  It is a wild rose - but a selected form.

 

I see. It's complicated this flower stuff. Thanks again for your expertise.

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Posted (edited)

Hello, it's Mr. Botanically Challenged again. I'm back with a few more flowers that I'm hoping someone can help me identify. Thanks.

 

#1 (looks familiar, but I have no idea )

 

unkown-flower-2C4EY7H.jpg

 

 

#2 (very large flowers -- a type of lily perhaps?)

 

large-yellow-flowers-2C4EY6N.jpg

 

 

#3 (miniature roses or carnations maybe?)

 

small-white-flowers-2C4EY78.jpg

 

#4

 

unknown-flower-2C4EY7W.jpg

Edited by John Mitchell

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Posted (edited)

The first is a Dahlia... not sure what the name might be thou... the second looks like a Day lily.. the last is Red Hot Poker.. can`t help with the #3.

Edited by Sharon

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32 minutes ago, Sharon said:

The first is a Dahlia... not sure what the name might be thou... the second looks like a Day lily.. the last is Red Hot Poker.. can`t help with the #3.

 

Thanks very much, Sharon. Those ID's sound right on. The Red Hot Poker (love the name) appears to be nearing the end of its cycle, "going to seed" I guess you could say.

 

Specimen #3 was growing by the side of a road, a large bush, but it looks too "cultivated" to be a wildflower. Hopefully someone else has a suggestion.

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Sharon is right with #1 and #4 but I can narrow it down a bit further for you, John.

 

#1 is a decorative type Dahlia.  Can't give you the cultivar but it's in that class.

#2 is an Asiatic type lily, Lilium variety

#3 is a double rose.  Looking at your image it could well be one of the small flowered climbing or rambler roses - quite a few of those. I'm afraid

#4 is a Kniphofia, red hot poker, torch lily.  They flower from the base upwards so it's about half way through it's flowering period.  

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16 minutes ago, John Richmond said:

Sharon is right with #1 and #4 but I can narrow it down a bit further for you, John.

 

#1 is a decorative type Dahlia.  Can't give you the cultivar but it's in that class.

#2 is an Asiatic type lily, Lilium variety

#3 is a double rose.  Looking at your image it could well be one of the small flowered climbing or rambler roses - quite a few of those. I'm afraid

#4 is a Kniphofia, red hot poker, torch lily.  They flower from the base upwards so it's about half way through it's flowering period.  

 

Thank you. Is #2 Asiatic lily related to the Daylily?

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9 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Thank you. Is #2 Asiatic lily related to the Daylily?

Not very closely, John.  Asiatic lilies are true lilies, Lilium species, characterised by upward facing lily flowers.  These are the ones you'll buy as cut flower lilies and are bulbs.  If you look at your photo the blooms are borne singly up the stem.  The individual flowers also last a lot longer then daylilies - Hemerocallis - which, as the name says rarely last longer than a day but are carried in flower heads on single stems so you get a succession of flowering during June and July.  These are perennials, not bulbs like the true liles.  

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3 hours ago, John Richmond said:

Not very closely, John.  Asiatic lilies are true lilies, Lilium species, characterised by upward facing lily flowers.  These are the ones you'll buy as cut flower lilies and are bulbs.  If you look at your photo the blooms are borne singly up the stem.  The individual flowers also last a lot longer then daylilies - Hemerocallis - which, as the name says rarely last longer than a day but are carried in flower heads on single stems so you get a succession of flowering during June and July.  These are perennials, not bulbs like the true liles.  

 

Much appreciated, John. These flowers do indeed last quite awhile, several days at least.

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As a suggestion, try Rambling Rector for #3. Coincidentally, I've just dead-headed one of these on an arch in my garden and it's a rambling rose. It certainly looks as if it could be it!

Jim. 

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Broad Norfolk said:

As a suggestion, try Rambling Rector for #3. Coincidentally, I've just dead-headed one of these on an arch in my garden and it's a rambling rose. It certainly looks as if it could be it!

Jim. 

 

Thanks very much for the suggestion. I'll check it out. However, the bush these roses were growing on seemed to be free-standing, so I'm not sure that it was a climber.

Edited by John Mitchell

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Posted (edited)

You been poking around our yard, John? 😃  The Asiatic lilies are fading now, but the Red Hot Pokers are coming in.

 

I can't take credit, though--the previous owner was a Navy doctor who was a bit property-starved from his assignments, and went on quite a planting spree here. He did a good job, but we did eliminate a couple of large gardens and the 25-30 raised beds. 

Edited by Bill Kuta

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5 hours ago, Bill Kuta said:

You been poking around our yard, John? 😃  The Asiatic lilies are fading now, but the Red Hot Pokers are coming in.

 

I can't take credit, though--the previous owner was a Navy doctor who was a bit property-starved from his assignments, and went on quite a planting spree here. He did a good job, but we did eliminate a couple of large gardens and the 25-30 raised beds. 

 

It could well have been me. I'm far too lazy to plant my own flowers. 🌻

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Here are two more flower images that I'm having trouble with:

 

1. Some kind of miniature daisies or related?

 

miniature-daisies-2C5K57B.jpg

 

 

2. Don't know what the purple flowers are -- others the same as above, I believe.

 

unknowm-flowers-2C5K56B.jpg

 

Thanks in advance...

 

 

 

 

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Hi John

 

#1 is Chamomile, Matricaria recutita, often called German chamomile in North America and often used as a medicinal herb.

#2 is Salvia nemorosa, Balkan clary..  Yours looks suspiciously like the deep purple variety 'Caradonna' but I don't know if that's available in Canada.

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, John Richmond said:

Hi John

 

#1 is Chamomile, Matricaria recutita, often called German chamomile in North America and often used as a medicinal herb.

#2 is Salvia nemorosa, Balkan clary..  Yours looks suspiciously like the deep purple variety 'Caradonna' but I don't know if that's available in Canada.

 

Thanks again, John. Is #1 ever used for chamomile tea?

 

P.S. People here pick wild chamomile and use it for tea. I know what it looks like (believe it or not).

Edited by John Mitchell

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1 hour ago, John Mitchell said:

Thanks again, John. Is #1 ever used for chamomile tea?

It can be.  I've never tried it but plenty of health food stores sell the dried leaves and flowers for tea making.

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Posted (edited)
28 minutes ago, John Richmond said:

It can be.  I've never tried it but plenty of health food stores sell the dried leaves and flowers for tea making.

 

I've often had té de manzanilla (chamomile tea) when in Mexico. It's good for stomach problems. The chamomile I've seen for sale in Mexican markets is the wild variety, which looks quite different, with no petals on the flowers.

Edited by John Mitchell

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2 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

I've often had té de manzanilla (chamomile tea) when in Mexico. It's good for stomach problems. The chamomile I've seen in Mexican markets is the wild variety, which looks quite different, with no petals on the flowers.

That's probably the more tender perennial chamomile, Chamaemelum nobile (Anthemis nobilis - taxonomists keep changing names!), which has finer leaves.  

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