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Darryl

Film rebate / not cropped

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I try to be careful with submissions and never submit anything with known issues, but I have never heard of this, and looking at the image, I have no idea what the problem is, or what this error might mean.

 

Thanks

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Have a very close look at the edges of the image.  I had this failure once, years ago, with a one-pixel white border around the image (might only have been on two sides - can't remember now).  Cause - I had 'Chromatic Aberration' ticked, 'Auto Scale Image' ticked but had 'Edge' set to 'White Color' instead of 'Edge Extension'.  Photoshop - Lens Correction filter.

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Its quite easy to get a black border when cropping in Photoshop, never encountered a white one. But yes, if I've done any cropping or verticals correcting, I have a careful check

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That was probably it. It was details on a building with a lot of shadows. Some of them may have looked like a black border to someone not paying attention. Fortunately, it was a one-off and I didn't get put in the sin bin.

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What does 'film rebate' mean? Looked but couldn't find an explanation. Just had my first rejection in 202 submissions for this.

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36 minutes ago, steve18 said:

What does 'film rebate' mean? Looked but couldn't find an explanation. Just had my first rejection in 202 submissions for this.

 

In Lightroom when you crop and rotate a picture sometimes; if your image is smaller than the background a sliver or chamfer of white will show through on the edges. Cheers!

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Thanks for the reply. I used photoshop for a composite of 10 images so I guess these are rejected due to the borders between them? Single images from now on.

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The term “Film rebate”, I believe, comes from old prints that used to be. You picked them up from the drugstore and they had white borders on them, or film markings. Nowadays, with digital, there is no such thing, but the term was probably set by Alamy when they started up, because film was “it” then.  And some scans showed edges that shouldn’t be shown once in awhile.

Nowadays, if you straighten an image quite a bit, in my case anyway, I see white corners and the image has to be cropped to get rid of the white. If my image background is white, it makes it hard to discern the true edges.

I guess Alamy could use “leveling edges” instead, but once you figure out what “film rebate” means, you just know from then on. A rose by any other name is still a rose, and all that jazz! 😁

Betty

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21 hours ago, steve18 said:

I used photoshop for a composite of 10 images so I guess these are rejected due to the borders between them?

 

I'm sure the reason for failure will be a bit of border showing somewhere around the perimeter as others have said, though if your composite happened to have visible 'joins' that would fail as well of course, but I think they would have a different term for the problem. On the other hand if you are using Photomerge in Photoshop or Lightroom to join images then the border around the perimeter is rarely completely clean even if you've used a tripod and a levelling head and carefully set up the overlaps, rotated around the lens axis etc. Photoshop & Lightroom will crop this out if you check the box but if you do it manually it's possible to miss a bit, easy to check now on your failed image. 

 

Film rebate is originally just that, the area on the film that doesn't receive the image but is needed to transport the film through the camera, indeed on early Leicas the image spilled over into the sprocket holes. Photographers such as Cartier-Bresson and James Ravilious amongst others would always insist that their images were printed with the film rebate showing as a black border to show the entire image, to prove it hadn't been cropped. One notable exception to this rule is Cartier-Bresson's 'Behind the Gare St. Lazare', one of his most famous images, where he couldn't physically get his lens between the railings and so the image we see now is extensively cropped from a 35mm negative, taken in 1932! 

 

https://pro.magnumphotos.com/Asset/-2S5RYDI9CNRQ.html

 

 

 

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Thanks for the info Betty and Harry. I used to use film and print in my home darkroom but didn't know about the term rebate. 

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