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Shooting in the US; are we allowed?


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12 minutes ago, arterra said:

 

Must be "hellhole" Brussels ................. Oh wait........ Brussels isn't a country, but Belgium's capital ^_^............ But then again, Belgium is a city ........according to Trump.

Now I'm confused :wacko:

Ah well, must be the Netherlands then -_- Am I right or am I right?

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

I'm sure that Belgium is a beautiful city. I've never been there, but if I do go I'll bring plenty of chocolate to use a bribes at the border. And no it wasn't the Netherlands, which is a lovely group of islands I'm sure.

 

Poor Mr. Trump. He does get a bit confused at times. It's his age, you know. ^_^

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1 hour ago, John Mitchell said:

International borders are some of the scariest places on the planet.

Not in the EU, they're not. It's tough even to spot them sometimes. Just a small blue sign with 12 yellow stars on it and the name of the country in the middle.

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Recently, cops in Jinotega, Nicaragua, stopped a Nicaraguan photographer aggressively who was photographing a bank at 8 p.m. (after dark here even in the summer).  If you're not in the US, other rules apply.  I love taking night photographs, but that incident gives me pause about doing it other than New Years or at festivals when lots of other people are also out shooting with cell phones.  

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1 hour ago, MizBrown said:

Recently, cops in Jinotega, Nicaragua, stopped a Nicaraguan photographer aggressively who was photographing a bank at 8 p.m. (after dark here even in the summer).  If you're not in the US, other rules apply.  I love taking night photographs, but that incident gives me pause about doing it other than New Years or at festivals when lots of other people are also out shooting with cell phones.  

 

I've done quite a bit of travelling and photographing in Nicaragua. The only trouble I had was back in the late 90's, when two cops (compact men with big guns) in a rural area waved my rental car down on a sharp curve and told me that I had crossed a solid white line (I hadn't). I realized what they wanted when I saw locals -- who were hip to the scam -- slowing down and sticking their hands out the passenger window with a few wrinkled córdobas in them. The police were actually quite friendly, and I stood by the side of the road chatting with them in my bad Spanish for some time. Eventually, they handed me back my driver's license after I gave them one US dollar each, and I was on my way. I guess you could say it was a toll of sorts. Police don't get paid much in many countries.

Edited by John Mitchell
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13 hours ago, mickfly said:

I refer to my earlier comment Betty. It is that big a deal at immigration if you enter the USA as s foreigner.

The officer will ask "what is the purpose of your visit?"

If you are entering on a visitor visa and give the wrong answer (even lightheartedly) you will open a can of worms.

 

Yes, I can imagine so. I'm basically talking about once you're here. I don't think you'll have problems actually shooting.

That suggested, I would imagine there isn't a country in the world that hasn't given some photographer a living nightmare.

What we hear and read are those outlier horror stories instead of the thousands of good experiences the rest have had.

I believe Jeff had a pretty good grasp of that. After all, he holds his camera with the tips of his jet wings instead of fingers these days. 

Thats what evolution does. :D

Betty

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I drive into the USA fairly often and have to admit that I don't feel as comfortable as I used to. The US guards are noticeably more gruff and prying than when Obama was president.

 

http://www.macleans.ca/politics/washington/what-to-expect-when-you-cross-the-canada-u-s-border/

 

 

Edited by John Mitchell
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The only border I crossed until flying to St. Croix va Puerto Rico, which are US territories, was Canada, west coast. Never, ever want to do that again. Have you ever unpacked a large van full of camping equipment and clothing for 3 weeks?  Had everything emptied and searched?  Then had to remember how to put it all back so it would fit again?

 

And have them not find one tiny thing wrong!!!

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While I always agree with Edo.  The first thing I will tell you is to NEVER use the word "shooting."  NEVER.

I've traveled the world without much of a problem and my "kit" can be pretty extensive.  While I do have

press credentials I have never once shown them at a border.  Another rule is that you never tell anyone

with authority more than they asked or need to know.....

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11 hours ago, JeffGreenberg said:

First international trip a wild one...

Pan Am Round-the-World ticket ~1991;

no clue what I was doing, but dozens of 3-day stops all Northern Hemisphere continents;

arrived Bombay (Mumbai) without visa, airport police allowed me in after I stated I was there

to take new photos;  politeness & innocence without exaggeration is what made it happen, IMO... 

Would have loved being a mouse in your pocket through that trip. What an education! ;)

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On 7/10/2017 at 13:01, JeffGreenberg said:

 

 

What is source of this info???

Nothing found via Google.

But there are bank building images for "banco Jinotega Nicaragua"

Lets not be naive.  After dark.  Bank.  Less advanced country.

How did photographer behave?  Politely?  Provide ID & explain?

IME, many independent pro shooters are confrontational from the start...

There's protecting democratic principles & there's knowing how to get

what one wants...  Wait, isn't Nicaragua a fake democracy...?

 

It was posted by the photographer in a Nicaraguan Spanish-language Facebook group.   He is Nicaraguan.

 

My guess is that being out at night shooting pictures of a bank was the issue.  I've shot photos of one of the banks when it was under construction.  I have heard of expats being told not to photograph bank signs by bank guards, not in Jinotega. 

 

Nicaragua is more democratic than some parts of the US.  And it's becoming more and more prosperous.   Lower murder rate now than any other Central American country.  

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Things definitely have improved in Nicaragua from when I first visited there in the 90's. The USA isn't doing too badly either on the freedom front according to this list (despite all the "fake news" that President T. complains about). Switzerland and New Zealand top the list.

Edited by John Mitchell
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