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It was mentioned in another thread to put this camera on full auto and shoot.  What I want to know, does this mean P for program or one of the Intelligent Autos?  The green icon or the brown one with the +?  I've been shooting RAW with the green one, with top ISO set to 800.  Should I set it at 1600?

My images have been wonderful with the exception of something that was moving in lower light, which probably means I should up the ISO limit to get a faster shutter speed.  Just curious as to what you RX100 shooters are doing.

 

Betty

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Hi Betty,

 

I have tried iAuto and the results were OK but I do not like the multi point focuus it selects.   So if anything I prefer to use the P setting.

 

I normal use I use A at f5.6,  but P could be safer in situations where the light might vary from shot to shot such as moving in and out of shops.  Do you do that??

 

According to  book "Photographers Guide to the Sony DSC RX100"  the gold coloured iAuto has all the features of the green one but additionally tries to recognise the type of scene Landscape, Portrait etc.   and may sometimes shoot several pictures and combine them.

 

Hope this helps.

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Thank you, Peter.  

Yes, I noticed the multi point focus with iAuto, and wondered if it was something I was failing to set right, lol!  I'll put it on P and try it out.  A lot of my shots are stealth shots taken indoors in offices, malls and stores, places I would never carry my D800.  So yes, the light is variable for sure.  I think iAuto is good for broad shots, but I have noticed when playing around with the camera and taking shots of my husband sitting in his chair, often his face wasn't sharp but his shirt sleeve was crisp.  That's the fault of the multi-focus.

I'll also try A at your f5.6 and see what happens!

 

I appreciate your input. Thank you again.

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Betty,

 

I tend to use the centre focus point and then recompose after focussing, just because that is the way I am used to working.

 

On the RX100, if the point you wish to focus on is significantly off centre, I do find the Tracking Focus function is very good.

 

If you are in good light and using my A f5.6 method, you have a lot of depth of field which is forgiving for focussing errors.

 

I have had a few problems with mis-focus on the RX100 but mainly when the whole subjet is far away, say when trying to focus on a beach from a cliff top.

 

I suggest you have a practice with Tracking Focus and see how that goes.

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Betty,

 

I tend to use the centre focus point and then recompose after focussing, just because that is the way I am used to working.

 

On the RX100, if the point you wish to focus on is significantly off centre, I do find the Tracking Focus function is very good.

 

If you are in good light and using my A f5.6 method, you have a lot of depth of field which is forgiving for focussing errors.

 

I have had a few problems with mis-focus on the RX100 but mainly when the whole subjet is far away, say when trying to focus on a beach from a cliff top.

 

I suggest you have a practice with Tracking Focus and see how that goes.

I will try tracking focus, Peter.  There are many things I haven't tried yet.  I do have center point chosen, because I've always worked with the small center point (and recomposing) with my Nikon cameras.  I want my subject well exposed, always.

I'm still in the honeymoon stage with this little camera, but so far I am thrilled with some of the images I've gotten!  The "wow" factor hasn't worn off, yet. :)  Probably the only thing that bugs me is the shutter release button.  When I reach up without looking, my finger never seems to find it. It seems to me it should be further toward the right edge of the camera.  I'll get used to it I suppose!

 

I appreciate your taking the time to help me out.

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Betty,

 

I tend to use the centre focus point and then recompose after focussing, just because that is the way I am used to working.

 

On the RX100, if the point you wish to focus on is significantly off centre, I do find the Tracking Focus function is very good.

 

If you are in good light and using my A f5.6 method, you have a lot of depth of field which is forgiving for focussing errors.

 

I have had a few problems with mis-focus on the RX100 but mainly when the whole subjet is far away, say when trying to focus on a beach from a cliff top.

 

I suggest you have a practice with Tracking Focus and see how that goes.

I will try tracking focus, Peter.  There are many things I haven't tried yet.  I do have center point chosen, because I've always worked with the small center point (and recomposing) with my Nikon cameras.  I want my subject well exposed, always.

I'm still in the honeymoon stage with this little camera, but so far I am thrilled with some of the images I've gotten!  The "wow" factor hasn't worn off, yet. :)  Probably the only thing that bugs me is the shutter release button.  When I reach up without looking, my finger never seems to find it. It seems to me it should be further toward the right edge of the camera.  I'll get used to it I suppose!

 

I appreciate your taking the time to help me out.

I am glad you are thrilled with your RX10,  I am still learning what my rx100 can do and generally shoot in A mode with the centre focus point and are having great fun on the way, ... I know what you mean about the shutter release button as I have turned my camera off a couple of times whilst going to press the shutter release :mellow:  the RX 100 is never going to replace my D700 but I will say that I have got a few images with it that I possibly wouldn't have got with my not quite so stealthy D700 ;)

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Betty,

 

I tend to use the centre focus point and then recompose after focussing, just because that is the way I am used to working.

 

On the RX100, if the point you wish to focus on is significantly off centre, I do find the Tracking Focus function is very good.

 

If you are in good light and using my A f5.6 method, you have a lot of depth of field which is forgiving for focussing errors.

 

I have had a few problems with mis-focus on the RX100 but mainly when the whole subjet is far away, say when trying to focus on a beach from a cliff top.

 

I suggest you have a practice with Tracking Focus and see how that goes.

I will try tracking focus, Peter.  There are many things I haven't tried yet.  I do have center point chosen, because I've always worked with the small center point (and recomposing) with my Nikon cameras.  I want my subject well exposed, always.

I'm still in the honeymoon stage with this little camera, but so far I am thrilled with some of the images I've gotten!  The "wow" factor hasn't worn off, yet. :)  Probably the only thing that bugs me is the shutter release button.  When I reach up without looking, my finger never seems to find it. It seems to me it should be further toward the right edge of the camera.  I'll get used to it I suppose!

 

I appreciate your taking the time to help me out.

I am glad you are thrilled with your RX10,  I am still learning what my rx100 can do and generally shoot in A mode with the centre focus point and are having great fun on the way, ... I know what you mean about the shutter release button as I have turned my camera off a couple of times whilst going to press the shutter release :mellow:  the RX 100 is never going to replace my D700 but I will say that I have got a few images with it that I possibly wouldn't have got with my not quite so stealthy D700 ;)

Steve, since you are also a Nikon shooter, maybe we both are reaching for where the Nikon shutter release button should be!  I have also turned the camera off by mistake, or pressed somewhere that did nothing because there was no button where I pressed.  I've missed a few shots because of it.  I guess I need to just practice finding the shutter release until I can do it without looking.  Muscle memory. :)

I did some simple testing last evening.

I shot a scene on A, 5.6, then shot it in P, then shot it on iAuto, the green one.  iAuto by far produced the best image as far as the balance of lights and darks.  But that was shooting indoors toward my dining room table, with a bright window behind.  

I suspect if a person had been sitting there, then perhaps the multi focus iAuto uses may have not made the person as sharp as I would like.  So I believe broad shots are best served by iAuto, then if I need the focus to be on a particular point, use either A or P.

 

The other scene was a bird bath outdoors, and I still preferred the iAuto shot. The other two were a bit too bright where the sun hit the base of the bird bath, but the shadows/sun were better balanced with iAuto.

 

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Betty,

 

I wondered why you were missing the shutter button, as I have never had any such problem.   If your fingers are Nikon trained, that could be the answer as I have never had or even handled a Nikon.

 

Keep us updated about the iAuto, if it really does work over a wide range of conditions it could be a good solution.

 

I did a number of images of an Armed Forces Day Parade in our local town on saturday, shot using A at f5.6.  I uploaded 6 as news pictures.  I saved a lot of time by using the OOC jpegs with no PP at all, just had to type the captions and keywords.

 

Later preparing some more to upload as stock pictures I started using the RAW files, but soon reverted to jpegs.  If I can get the exposures right, the camera is doing a better conversion job than I can.  It looks like jpeg for immediate use and RAW for archive and for rescuing any problem exposures.

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I'm not going to upload yet, but I've been shooting in caves today at 640-6400 (auto set) speeds for multi shot hand hand twilight direct JPEG, and the results (most also at full aperture and around 1/10th-/40th shutter speeds) when reduced to 3600 x 2400 will I am sure be fine for Alamy - these are what would be considered impossible shots (flash banned, hardly any light, moving people). We have also been using the more audible multishot mode on Sony Alpha 99 and 580 (six to eight motordrive speed shots) to direct JPEG and these, also, overcome a problem in a situation where flash and tripod use was not allowed but photography was.

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I have had a few "test drives" with Hand-held twilight, but none yet of subjects I would want to upload.  Main problem seems to be people moving and the need to hold the camera rather still.   I need some more practice with it, but it could well become useful when the darker nights set in....

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Betty,

 

I wondered why you were missing the shutter button, as I have never had any such problem.   If your fingers are Nikon trained, that could be the answer as I have never had or even handled a Nikon.

 

Keep us updated about the iAuto, if it really does work over a wide range of conditions it could be a good solution.

 

I did a number of images of an Armed Forces Day Parade in our local town on saturday, shot using A at f5.6.  I uploaded 6 as news pictures.  I saved a lot of time by using the OOC jpegs with no PP at all, just had to type the captions and keywords.

 

Later preparing some more to upload as stock pictures I started using the RAW files, but soon reverted to jpegs.  If I can get the exposures right, the camera is doing a better conversion job than I can.  It looks like jpeg for immediate use and RAW for archive and for rescuing any problem exposures.

 

I haven't had the nerve yet to trust jpegs.  I must get over it! :)  I did, once, shoot RAW + jpeg but found the RAWs were the best.  Maybe because I like to "tweak".  One of these days I'll go out and try it again.  As far as iAuto goes, I took a series of images in waiting rooms, exam rooms, and a shopping mall using iAuto, and it did a fine job.  I was more than pleased. I'm still in the process of keywording them.

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I'm not going to upload yet, but I've been shooting in caves today at 640-6400 (auto set) speeds for multi shot hand hand twilight direct JPEG, and the results (most also at full aperture and around 1/10th-/40th shutter speeds) when reduced to 3600 x 2400 will I am sure be fine for Alamy - these are what would be considered impossible shots (flash banned, hardly any light, moving people). We have also been using the more audible multishot mode on Sony Alpha 99 and 580 (six to eight motordrive speed shots) to direct JPEG and these, also, overcome a problem in a situation where flash and tripod use was not allowed but photography was.

 

David, you do things I'd be terrified to do, and you always seem to come out on top.  I've been in caves.  A very difficult shooting arena.  I'm looking forward to seeing the results.

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I'm not going to upload yet, but I've been shooting in caves today at 640-6400 (auto set) speeds for multi shot hand hand twilight direct JPEG, and the results (most also at full aperture and around 1/10th-/40th shutter speeds) when reduced to 3600 x 2400 will I am sure be fine for Alamy - these are what would be considered impossible shots (flash banned, hardly any light, moving people). We have also been using the more audible multishot mode on Sony Alpha 99 and 580 (six to eight motordrive speed shots) to direct JPEG and these, also, overcome a problem in a situation where flash and tripod use was not allowed but photography was.

 

David, you do things I'd be terrified to do, and you always seem to come out on top.  I've been in caves.  A very difficult shooting arena.  I'm looking forward to seeing the results.

Same here, looking forward to see the results . Hurry up, David :) 

I started career in that wet, could, muddy hell. Thanks God there were cheap Russians cameras with good enough lenses B).  

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Using iAuto for indoor shooting...think inside a medical exam room....there was noise because of the high ISO required, no flash.  The noise is luminance noise that is very pleasant.  I have yet to encounter color noise. Those images have passed QC.  Who would have thought!

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Brave effort Betty!

 

Did you use the iAuto jpegs, or did you tinker the RAWs?

 

Peter, I shot in RAW only for these medical office images.  The only time I shot RAW +jpeg was an outdoor shoot at a nearby lake, which was my first test of the RX100 after purchase.  They were mages of golfers, portapotties, joggers, etc.  The jpegs sky had weird colors and transitions, so it scared me off jpegs.  Those shots were into the mid-morning sun.  Anything I shot away from the sun, the jpeg skies was fine.  The only tinkering I do on the RAWs is a bit of noise removal, white balance occasionally and if needed, opening up shadows a bit.  All in LR4, then move on to CS6 where I crop and keyword, mainly because I'm more familiar with Photoshop than LR, which I've only just began using in the past few weeks.  

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Betty,

 

That is interesting.  Many cameras have a tendency to make blue skies cyan, but I never had any such problem with the RX100.

 

Because the jpgs can be a good quick solution, I shoot RAW+jpg.   I have "Creative Style" set to Standard which I think of as "Not Creative".

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Peter, that's exactly what happened. Cyan skies, but as that color blended toward the light "sun" area, there were some weird, ugly color transition that I couldn't correct by opening into ACR.  As long as I shot away from the sun, it was fine.  I'm on "Standard" too.

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Peter, that's exactly what happened. Cyan skies, but as that color blended toward the light "sun" area, there were some weird, ugly color transition that I couldn't correct by opening into ACR.  As long as I shot away from the sun, it was fine.  I'm on "Standard" too.

 

Could be due to ACR. Do you have access to Aperture somewhere?

I'm bringing this up because of this guy (pun): Guy Gowan from min 39:25

 

wim

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The colour shift is due to clipping - as with Nikon D70 are many earlier cameras with 12 or 10 bit colour. If you use Recovery or Highlights in ACR, it can remove the colour change, but leave an odd monochrome desaturation in place (Canon 50D etc also do this really badly). Solution is to underexpose and open up in raw. The one main failing of the RX100 is that it's not got a load of clipping headroom. The new version is interesting because it doesn't have ISO 80, 100, 125 - the backlit CMOS is a full stop 'faster'. This could mean either better or worse dynamic range and colour clipping, depending on how they have handled it.

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The colour shift is due to clipping - as with Nikon D70 are many earlier cameras with 12 or 10 bit colour. If you use Recovery or Highlights in ACR, it can remove the colour change, but leave an odd monochrome desaturation in place (Canon 50D etc also do this really badly). Solution is to underexpose and open up in raw. The one main failing of the RX100 is that it's not got a load of clipping headroom. The new version is interesting because it doesn't have ISO 80, 100, 125 - the backlit CMOS is a full stop 'faster'. This could mean either better or worse dynamic range and colour clipping, depending on how they have handled it.

David, if shooting iAuto, I can't underexpose, can I?  I can only do that if I use A or S?  I guess those situations I had, when facing the sun I need to get off auto and go to A.

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