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I haven’t developed food photography skills but I’ve enjoyed seeing the various food images other contributors have made.

 

I thought I’d share an article I just saw on the Australian ABC website on the Food Photography Awards, and also the Guardian article as well on the same topic. They show a few different images from one another. I thought it might offer some inspiration for creative food photography…

 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-06-10/food-photography-awards-winners-2024/103959208

 

https://www.theguardian.com/food/gallery/2024/jun/05/pink-lady-food-photographer-of-the-year-2024

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12 minutes ago, Sally Robertson said:

I haven’t developed food photography skills but I’ve enjoyed seeing the various food images other contributors have made.

 

I thought I’d share an article I just saw on the Australian ABC website on the Food Photography Awards, and also the Guardian article as well on the same topic. They show a few different images from one another. I thought it might offer some inspiration for creative food photography…

 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-06-10/food-photography-awards-winners-2024/103959208

 

https://www.theguardian.com/food/gallery/2024/jun/05/pink-lady-food-photographer-of-the-year-2024

 

Superb and inspiring photos ! Thank you for sharing Sally. I haven't got the talent shown in these images but that would combine my two passions: photography and cooking.

I just posted in the Favourite Uploads thread mentioning I hadn't been very motivated to shoot during the trip. It's a shame because one day, we were taken to a fantastic meal of fish cooked in coconut milk and various other dishes. They were presented on a dish made of plaited palm fronds, very cleverly done. We had the demo afterwards after it was done. All I took were phone pix! 

 

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2 minutes ago, gvallee said:

 

Superb and inspiring photos ! Thank you for sharing Sally. I haven't got the talent shown in these images but that would combine my two passions: photography and cooking.

I just posted in the Favourite Uploads thread mentioning I hadn't been very motivated to shoot during the trip. It's a shame because one day, we were taken to a fantastic meal of fish cooked in coconut milk and various other dishes. They were presented on a dish made of plaited palm fronds, very cleverly done. We have the demo afterwards after it was done. All I took were phone pix! 


I particularly love the winning image. I too would love to take such food images.

 

I understand about the not feeling motivated to take photos as much on your trip. I think sometimes you just want to enjoy the moment and take it in. As a teenager when I was into photography with my Pentax K1000 SLR, on a family trip myself and my dad were obsessive with taking photos. I remember my mum saying to sometimes “let your eyes take the picture “. I think there is real value in slowing down and being present and sometimes just seeing without it always being through the viewfinder of the camera. I think that sometimes helps with perception and you become a bit more present the next time you do pick up the camera, if that makes any sense? I also think it’s sometimes enjoyable to just have the simplicity of the phone camera too.

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4 minutes ago, Sally Robertson said:


I particularly love the winning image. I too would love to take such food images.

 

I understand about the not feeling motivated to take photos as much on your trip. I think sometimes you just want to enjoy the moment and take it in. As a teenager when I was into photography with my Pentax K1000 SLR, on a family trip myself and my dad were obsessive with taking photos. I remember my mum saying to sometimes “let your eyes take the picture “. I think there is real value in slowing down and being present and sometimes just seeing without it always being through the viewfinder of the camera. I think that sometimes helps with perception and you become a bit more present the next time you do pick up the camera, if that makes any sense? I also think it’s sometimes enjoyable to just have the simplicity of the phone camera too.

 

Oh absolutely! It does resonate with me. When I lived in the Brazilian Amazon, in Manaus, I barely took any photos. The whole experience was too intense and overwhelming to have my eye stuck behind a viewfinder. I went to all sorts of events, a wedding on a floating house, staying with caboclos in their floating house on a lake, fishing, hunting, all sorts of situations and experiences. Not to mention access to Indigenous areas so so incredibly remote and wild. One consolation is that I'm sure there is not much demand for this kind of photography. More like urban life in Sao Paulo. I can draw a parallel with my current Outback pictures. What's more important? Being happy or an elusive $ sale?

 

 

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8 minutes ago, gvallee said:

 

Oh absolutely! It does resonate with me. When I lived in the Brazilian Amazon, in Manaus, I barely took any photos. The whole experience was too intense and overwhelming to have my eye stuck behind a viewfinder. I went to all sorts of events, a wedding on a floating house, staying with caboclos in their floating house on a lake, fishing, hunting, all sorts of situations and experiences. Not to mention access to Indigenous areas so so incredibly remote and wild. One consolation is that I'm sure there is not much demand for this kind of photography. More like urban life in Sao Paulo. I can draw a parallel with my current Outback pictures. What's more important? Being happy or an elusive $ sale?

 

 


That would have been a phenomenal experience in the Amazon. I love remote places. It’s like the more remote the more peaceful and at home I feel. I understand you being more in the experience than taking photos. I can tell you love the remoteness and wildness too.

 

For some reason I feel connected to the remnant wild places in the WA Wheatbelt and took quite a few photos there last year. But it’s not a major tourism area so less likely to sell than other places in the state. Yet, I love it, especially the salmon gum woodlands (which I actually weirdly have hardly photographed, perhaps again because I’m just absorbing those places). I agree that being happy is important rather than trying so hard for a $ sale. I am going to try to focus on some more tourist oriented images, but I know I will keep being drawn back to the places I love.

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I was warned when I was going to the Masai Mara that I should be sure to put the camera down now and then and just experience it. It was good advice.

 

Paulette

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When my husband and I were in the Anza Borega desert in California near the Mexican border, I'd been taking photos all day and when it go dark, the stars were amazing. I had my tripod in our rental car but instead of fussing with the camera, he and I lay on the hood of the SUV and looked up at the most amazing night sky we'd ever seen - so romantica and not another person or light for miles...I can still visualize that sky and more important recall how I felt. It was too grand to watch through a viewfinder.

 

A while later we saw a car speeding toward us from far away in the otherwise empty desert. It was a couple of Homeland Security guys. Turns out one grew up near me in NY and was one of my closest friend's huband's cousins. Small world. Big universe overhead. 

 

 

Edited by Marianne
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5 hours ago, Marianne said:

When my husband and I were in the Anza Borega desert in California near the Mexican border, I'd been taking photos all day and when it go dark, the stars were amazing. I had my tripod in our rental car but instead of fussing with the camera, he and I lay on the hood of the SUV and looked up at the most amazing night sky we'd ever seen - so romantica and not another person or light for miles...I can still visualize that sky and more important recall how I felt. It was too grand to watch through a viewfinder.

 

A while later we saw a car speeding toward us from far away in the otherwise empty desert. It was a couple of Homeland Security guys. Turns out one grew up near me in NY and was one of my closest friend's huband's cousins. Small world. Big universe overhead. 

 

 

 

That's a beautiful memory Marianne. I have a similar memory of watching a solar eclipse on the beach at night during which I also remember counting 12 shooting stars that were quite spectacular. The whole feeling of that night is etched in my memory. I was 11 at the time.

 

It's amazing you had that encounter with the person connected to you too. The world is indeed small and the universe also vast at the same time.

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5 minutes ago, NYCat said:

Sleeping under the stars in the San Bernardino mountains as a Camp Fire Girl I would fall asleep counting the falling stars.

 

Paulette

 

That's an absolutely beautiful memory Paulette. I can't think of a better way to fall asleep than counting falling stars.

 

The last time I slept under the stars was camping in a swag. It was wonderful to be looking up at the stars before going to sleep. The only concern was the kangaroos thumping through in the night. I was worried they might thump right on top of me!

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