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Many of my images are taken using tilt shift lenses, 90mm +28mm to improve focus and / or correct verticals, also to make panoramas.

Do other tilt shift users include this information in the tags or other image info, or not. I'm intrigued as it seems to me that in some circumstances it could inform potential buyers that the image looks that way because of the lens used, rather than digital adjustments.

Any thoughts or experience would be appreciated.

Regards

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I don't. I use a 28mm shift lens or, more recently, software to achieve a natural look on tall buildings. 

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35 minutes ago, Marsh said:

Many of my images are taken using tilt shift lenses, 90mm +28mm to improve focus and / or correct verticals, also to make panoramas.

Do other tilt shift users include this information in the tags or other image info, or not. I'm intrigued as it seems to me that in some circumstances it could inform potential buyers that the image looks that way because of the lens used, rather than digital adjustments.

Any thoughts or experience would be appreciated.

Regards

I don't have a tilt shift, but this has got me thinking about adding a tag, where applicable, for telephoto compression because those images can be quite distinctive.

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7500 images on Alamy have the tag Tilt Shift.  Including 2 ancient ones of mine. I have a 24 and I use a 17mm a lot.

Be aware that most people nowadays are expecting something quite different when they are looking for tilt shift images: images with a fake miniature effect. Most if not all filters to achieve this are called tilt shift.

 

wim

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2 hours ago, wiskerke said:

7500 images on Alamy have the tag Tilt Shift.  Including 2 ancient ones of mine. I have a 24 and I use a 17mm a lot.

Be aware that most people nowadays are expecting something quite different when they are looking for tilt shift images: images with a fake miniature effect. Most if not all filters to achieve this are called tilt shift.

 

wim

 

A bit gimmicky -- they also make me dizzy -- but interesting. There are surprisingly few fake miniature effect images available on Alamy by the looks of it. Apparently this effect can be achieved with PS, but I wonder if there are optical filters that can be used as well.

 

Whoops! Using the phrase "miniature effect"  (without the "fake") brings up many more images.

Edited by John Mitchell

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9 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

A bit gimmicky -- they also make me dizzy -- but interesting. There are surprisingly few fake miniature effect images available on Alamy by the looks of it. Apparently this effect can be achieved with PS, but I wonder if there are optical filters that can be used as well.

 

Whoops! Using the phrase "miniature effect"  (without the "fake") brings up many more images.

 

My point is that most of the 7,428 images on Alamy that are labeled / tagged / keyworded Tilt Shift are using a tilt shift lens or a digital filter to achieve a fake miniature effect. Not using the term fake miniature, but using the term Tilt Shift.

And that the searches for Tilt Shift (still 46 for the rolling year) all seem to look for fake miniature images. Not for images taken with a tilt shift lens with the purpose of keeping lines straight and planes in focus, but the exact opposite. So if you do label images tilt shift that are not fake miniature those will only result in false positives sending your CTR down.

 

wim

 

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IMHO, I don't think the photographic equipment used to make the image is important to the potential client.

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Thanks for the replies all.

I think wim's points have made up my mind that adding info would be wasted effort, we can fix perspective/stack focus, and even make fake miniature effects with software, why bother losing more time than using a ts or software to produce images has already taken?

Cheers

Marshall

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