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Timelapses: Hyper zoom tutorial


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The more commonly used term for this kind of footage seems to be hyper-lapse. Hyperzoom seems to be a refinement of this generic technique which Geoff Tompkison has trademarked.  I haven't gone into it in detail and I'm not a lawyer, but I guess if we stick to hyperlapse there is less likely to be an issue.

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4 hours ago, Joseph Clemson said:

The more commonly used term for this kind of footage seems to be hyper-lapse. Hyperzoom seems to be a refinement of this generic technique which Geoff Tompkison has trademarked.  I haven't gone into it in detail and I'm not a lawyer, but I guess if we stick to hyperlapse there is less likely to be an issue.

Thank you Joseph,
for hyper lapse we generally mean a time lapse where the point of view is moving, either walking, or from a car, bus, boat, cable car and so on.
In this case the POV is static, but the zoom is performed using different focal lens. We generally call it hyper zoom, or sometimes super zoom

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Adding the letters 'TM' after a word doesn't seem to make the term legally protected. The word would need to be fully registered with the appropriate body and then the letter 'R' in a circle can be used. There would also be a legal difference to the terms 'hyperzoom', 'hyper-zoom' and 'hyper zoom'. More info here:

https://www.lawtrades.com/blog/answers/intellectual-property-differences/#

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18 minutes ago, AndrewP said:

Adding the letters 'TM' after a word doesn't seem to make the term legally protected. The word would need to be fully registered with the appropriate body and then the letter 'R' in a circle can be used. There would also be a legal difference to the terms 'hyperzoom', 'hyper-zoom' and 'hyper zoom'. More info here:

https://www.lawtrades.com/blog/answers/intellectual-property-differences/#

 

I see the website and photographer concerned with Hyperzoom is UK based and the term has been properly registered as a trademark in the UK. After this little nugget of info, I am out of my depth as I have no idea how that affects generic usage of the term and/or usage in other parts of the world.

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You would think that if he's gone to the trouble of registering the name as a trademark then he'd also register the web addresses hyperzoom.co.uk and hyperzoom.com but both seem to be available.

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On 7/12/2018 at 20:56, AndrewP said:

Adding the letters 'TM' after a word doesn't seem to make the term legally protected. The word would need to be fully registered with the appropriate body and then the letter 'R' in a circle can be used. There would also be a legal difference to the terms 'hyperzoom', 'hyper-zoom' and 'hyper zoom'. More info here:

https://www.lawtrades.com/blog/answers/intellectual-property-differences/#

Thank you Andrew,
very interesting link

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Rather unwisely he seems to have trademarked only the lower case single word, and he may know it, which is why he is using the meaningless (in the UK)  term TM for the capitalised version, because if he used (R) he might be committing an offence.

Even if the trademark is unchallengeable, you ought to be able to use the separate words as you'r not describing a trade or service . Unless you get a solicitor's letter.

 

 

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18 hours ago, spacecadet said:

Rather unwisely he seems to have trademarked only the lower case single word, and he may know it, which is why he is using the meaningless (in the UK)  term TM for the capitalised version, because if he used (R) he might be committing an offence.

Even if the trademark is unchallengeable, you ought to be able to use the separate words as you'r not describing a trade or service . Unless you get a solicitor's letter.

 

 

Thank you for the input Spacecadet,
I am very confused: hyper zoom is a word we all use for a specific technique, I had no idea that somebody could copyright it.
A bit like if someone copyrighted "landscape photography" and nobody could use it anymore!

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