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Regular search for tulip prinses irene


Chris Burrows
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43 minutes ago, Chris Burrows said:

Does anyone have any idea why someone would search for tulip prinses irene almost every week day?  Searched for 51 times in the last three months.

 

English isn't their first language or they are dyslexic.  Tulip Princess Irene is what  I suspect the person is looking for.  Google search for that comes up with a number of pictures.  Someone with that variety spelled correctly might want to put the misspelling in their keyboards and see what happens. Alamy has photos of Tulip Princess Irene. 

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1 hour ago, Rebecca Ore said:

 

English isn't their first language or they are dyslexic.  Tulip Princess Irene is what  I suspect the person is looking for.  Google search for that comes up with a number of pictures.  Someone with that variety spelled correctly might want to put the misspelling in their keyboards and see what happens. Alamy has photos of Tulip Princess Irene. 

Haha! It's the official name of the tulip. And you've guessed it: English is not the tulip's first language. 😁

 

tulip prinses irene: 69 results (kudo's for keywording!)

tulip princess irene: 142 results

 

Now indeed why all those searches? Are they all the same client? Looking for copyright infringement? Yes there's copyright on tulips.

Why has Chris noticed? Because he has a couple of good images of that one.

Are they selling?

Are the searches from Canada? The dark red pattern on the orange tulips looks a lot like a Canadian Maple Leaf. This led to the name in 1949: the princess was born in Canada during WW2 and her name Irene means Peace.

It's a very strong and very popular tulip btw.

 

wim

 

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2 hours ago, Rebecca Ore said:

 

English isn't their first language or they are dyslexic.  Tulip Princess Irene is what  I suspect the person is looking for.  Google search for that comes up with a number of pictures.  Someone with that variety spelled correctly might want to put the misspelling in their keyboards and see what happens. Alamy has photos of Tulip Princess Irene. 

The correst spelling of the tulip is 'Prinses Irene', but if I had a photo of it, I'd probably put Princess Irene also, for the benefit of people who didn't know that (I see that a few nurseries give both spellings, presumably for the same reason).

I doubt if the OP was asking about spelling, but why it would be searched on so often, a question I can't help with.

Edited by Cryptoprocta
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15 hours ago, wiskerke said:

Haha! It's the official name of the tulip. And you've guessed it: English is not the tulip's first language. 😁

 

tulip prinses irene: 69 results (kudo's for keywording!)

tulip princess irene: 142 results

 

Now indeed why all those searches? Are they all the same client? Looking for copyright infringement? Yes there's copyright on tulips.

Why has Chris noticed? Because he has a couple of good images of that one.

Are they selling?

Are the searches from Canada? The dark red pattern on the orange tulips looks a lot like a Canadian Maple Leaf. This led to the name in 1949: the princess was born in Canada during WW2 and her name Irene means Peace.

It's a very strong and very popular tulip btw.

 

wim

 

Appears to have started on 22/9/22 and since then searched for 59 times including yesterday.

As far as I can recall so far no sales for this tulip on Alamy.

Fairly sure it is always the same searcher as the search term never varies, always no capitals or quote marks.

I expect I will never know why the almost daily search for this flower.

 

 

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1 minute ago, Chris Burrows said:

Fairly sure it is always the same searcher as the search term never varies, always no capitals or quote marks.

I expect I will never know why the almost daily search for this flower.

Sounds like the opening paragraph of a novel, or an Alan Bennett play.

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16 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 Yes there's copyright on tulips.

Well, inasmuch as there is a period of time (25 or 30 years) of Plant Breeder's Rights, PBR,

This protects the plant from being propagated and resold, to give the breeder the benefit of their work, but I don't know how that could be established from photos, unless the photo showed the plants being sold, and even then, it wouldn't show whether the seller had paid for a licence to sell or not.

Plants aren't 'copyright' in that you can't sell photos of them.

JFI, Tulipa 'Prinses Irene' was apparently introduced in 1949, so well out of PBR.

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