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The Secret Ingredient


FOTOLINCS
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On the subject "Creativity isn't subjective" Pre-visualisation is a strongly flagged-up subject in my latest book; YOUR WILDLIFE JOURNEY (page 59; Your secret weapon).  It states;  "If I was asked to reveal the number one red hot tip for any photographer it would have to be “photograph the scene in your mind’s eye first”. Trust me on this one, if you are just starting out on this wonderful wildlife photographic journey or any photographic journey you probably won’t have recognised just how big a deal this is yet. Those of you who have ‘seen a few years’ will know exactly what I mean.  Let me give you a quick ‘for instance’. You arrive at your photographic venue, you see the scene in front of you (whatever that may be) and you reach for your camera. If you haven’t PRE-VISUALISED the hoped-for image how can you possibly know what focal length lens you need? How can you know what aperture or shutter speed?"

My book was published this year March 11th. Your Wildlife Journey (How to navigate the world of wildlife photography.)   https://www.blurb.com/b/11092072-your-wildlife-journey

 

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2 hours ago, FOTOLINCS said:

 how can you possibly know what focal length lens you need? How can you know what aperture or shutter speed?"

Er, experience? I tend to think about what I want while the camera is on its way to my eye.

I assume you mean something different from, or additional to, Minor White's version, because he was really talking about the zone system.

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Er? (I read you.)  Ah, 'experience' well my friend in my 70 years behind a camera, (a wildlife photographer's camera,) I have seen cameras lifted up to photograph something with no thought of lens, aperture, or height, usually eye level. so, well done you, at least you do think about it even though your camera is already on its way to your eye as you say. 

Pre-visualisation is the vital ingredient whatever you are going to photograph otherwise your library will contain only 'snaps'.

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10 hours ago, FOTOLINCS said:

You arrive at your photographic venue, you see the scene in front of you (whatever that may be) and you reach for your camera. If you haven’t PRE-VISUALISED the hoped-for image how can you possibly know what focal length lens you need? How can you know what aperture or shutter speed?"

 

 

Depending what and where I will be photographing I pack either 2 bodies with 24-70 and 70-300mm lenses attached. If I know I'll be photographing up close up or in a small area I will want to show off, then I'll pack another body with a 17-35mm lens attached. Depending upon the known or expected light levels and what type of action maybe expected I'll preset my cameras iso and aperture to enable a suitable shutter speed. I pack a compact monopod and cable release when I expect a need to gain height in a crowd. I naturally pre visualise (although I don't think the words 'pre visualise') my requirements as a matter of course when I pack my back pack so I am all ready to shoot at my destination. It works for me. 

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After too many years photographing on location, I now keep my DSLR's at 100ISO, f 5.6 and bodies set on A.

I also always carry my old Minolta IV F meter.  Currently go out with 3 bodies, 16-28, 35-70 and either a

70-200 or 120-300 and two NIKON SB-800 on camera strobes.

 

With short (wide) lenses "Pre-Focus" and aperture is also really important, comes from years working with

rangefinder film bodies.

 

Chuck

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  • 4 weeks later...

Two bodies, these days set on manual exposure with auto ISO - I choose the speed and aperture and the camera works around that. 
Four lenses - 20 or 24mm f1.4; 28-70 zoom; 135 f1.8 and 300 f4.  I know zooms are more flexible but I really like the fixed lengths.

and a laptop of course...

 

Edited by Phil Robinson
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