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Another Plant ID


Stokie
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Sorry, for another plant ID. It was in an arid garden in July in England, there wasn't a label and I've tried finding it on the "seek" app - but it says it's a bird!

 

Thanks in advance, John.

the-desert-wash-garden-at-east-ruston-old-vicarage-garden-east-ruston-norfolk-england-uk-2F67RAC.jpg

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In Brazil it is known as Puya alpestris "Sapphire Tower" It is native to dry hills, rocks in central and southern Chile at altitudes from 0 to 2200 meters. It is one of the most southerly species within the family. Puya alpestris is one of the few species of Puya that are grown in some parks and gardens as an ornamental plant. Scientific name: Puya alpestris Family: Bromeliaceae Genre: Puya Order: Bromeliales Class: Liliopsida
 
 
 
 
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1 hour ago, Jose Decio Molaro said:
In Brazil it is known as Puya alpestris "Sapphire Tower" It is native to dry hills, rocks in central and southern Chile at altitudes from 0 to 2200 meters. It is one of the most southerly species within the family. Puya alpestris is one of the few species of Puya that are grown in some parks and gardens as an ornamental plant. Scientific name: Puya alpestris Family: Bromeliaceae Genre: Puya Order: Bromeliales Class: Liliopsida

 

45 minutes ago, John Richmond said:

Jose is quite right, it's Puya alpestris.  It's quite often grown down here in SW England but it doesn't flower as regularly as some of the other Puya species.  A shame because the flowers are spectacular in their colouring.

 

Yes, many thanks both of you, it is a Puya alpestris.

 

Cheers, John.

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24 minutes ago, Stokie said:

 

 

Yes, many thanks both of you, it is a Puya alpestris.

 

Cheers, John.

Puya alpestris, an exotic plant native to the Andean slopes of South America. What a rare treatment! We still see the flower producing only once every six years, and it is an exciting event that takes place over several weeks. The family of bromeliads.

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