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I just had a great idea on how to easily make millions at this business, and thought I'd mess with vector illustration a bit. :)

So I had a few fundamental technical questions for anyone who would be kind of enough to answer. I do understand the basic concept of how vector files work as opposed to raster files. And I've gone thru a few informative, online tutorials.

 

But I'd still like to know if "vector files" created in Photoshop CC using "paths" to design shapes can be saved as EPS files that are perfectly compatible with Alamy standards. (assuming all the technicals are perfect, of course). That is, can I get by solely with Photoshop or not at all, and will need to utilize other programs such as Illustrator?

 

And then, after creating a vector file in PS, do you need to flatten all the layers before saving and uploading to Alamy? Plus, let's say you get that really nice design. Is it a good idea to make many similar variations- like changing sky colors, adding clouds, or other elements?

 

Plus I've dabbled in making a vector illustration in PS, (using pen paths and filling shapes), but can I then use the art brush within those shapes so that the final product becomes an artistic (even painterly) illustration all as a genuine vector? 

 

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I play around with vectors for my other businesses, but don't bother with Alamy.  I use a piece of Software called Affinity Design.  Fairly inexpensive (around $50US) and very user friendly.

 

For uploading, I believe you have to upload both the eps or ai file as well as a jpg version.  It is the vector that most buyers want so they can adjust sizing without losing definition.

 

Best to check all Alamy's rules for uploading vectors.

 

Jill

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18 hours ago, MMiller said:

But I'd still like to know if "vector files" created in Photoshop CC using "paths" to design shapes can be saved as EPS files that are perfectly compatible with Alamy standards. (assuming all the technicals are perfect, of course). That is, can I get by solely with Photoshop or not at all, and will need to utilize other programs such as Illustrator?

 

Photoshop's vector tools are intended to aid the production of raster images and are fairly limited in scope. Illustrator's tools are far more varied and powerful.

 

If you save a Photoshop document as an EPS file, simple shapes drawn as 'Smart Objects' will be preserved as vectors but not necessarily in their original form. For example, a path with a dashed stroke applied will be saved as a series of rectangles. The fill colour might be saved as a raster image masked by the shape so it could be difficult to produce a pure vector EPS.  

 

 

18 hours ago, MMiller said:

And then, after creating a vector file in PS, do you need to flatten all the layers before saving and uploading to Alamy? Plus, let's say you get that really nice design. Is it a good idea to make many similar variations- like changing sky colors, adding clouds, or other elements?

 

Plus I've dabbled in making a vector illustration in PS, (using pen paths and filling shapes), but can I then use the art brush within those shapes so that the final product becomes an artistic (even painterly) illustration all as a genuine vector? 

 

 

If you flatten the file, all the Smart Object layers and vector text layers will be rasterised.

 

Paths drawn with the pen tool then stroked and/or filled will be rasterised.  When using the pen tool, select 'Shape' in the menu bar to create a Smart Object.

 

Generally, when applying artistic effects or filters to a Smart Object, the object will be rasterised. (The same applies to many of the special effects in Illustrator so if you wish to submit 'painterly' images you might be better off producing them in raster format anyway and submitting them as jpegs.) 

 

Why not download a trial version of Illustrator (or another vector editor, such as the one suggested by Jill) and see which program best suits your illustration style.

 

Edited by Sprocket

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Thank you both Jill and Sprocket. Yes, I will try Illustrator since I already have the CC and can at least get a free trial to start.

 

 

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Good luck with Illustrator.  I found it had a very steep learning curve, so a month isn't enough to get the feel of it unless you can devote a lot of time to learning it.  I still think that the fee of $25US per month to use it is a bit pricey, unless you use it for a number of different purposes.

 

Jill

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I tried it and didn’t enjoy it. Apparently my talent (haha) doesn’t run to that kind of work.  But thank heavens peoples’ brains are different and what bores one is exciting and challenging for others.  I found I could shoot and process 40 stock images or two to four wall art pieces using layers, composites and textures in the time it took me to do one illustration. Then the illustration was usually sub par and unusable. 

Betty

 

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I'm in business! I downloaded the free seven day trial for Illustrator. My first genuine vector illustration is now up, accepted and for sale. Took about three days to create just one,  but from learning by doing, online tutorials and the helpful advice here (thanks)  future illustrations should be much easier.

 

Edited by MMiller
refine thoughts

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