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I had my 35 mm slides from the 1950's digitized.  When I submitted some of them Alamy said that the metadata was missing on some of them.  The digitizing company said that the metadata was on each photo.  Why the discrepancy?

 

Also, when a rejection says film rebate, what does that mean?

 

I'll appreciate your response

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Can't answer your Metadata question but film rebate means you have included it in your submissions to Alamy which they do not accept. Film rebate is the edge of the film with sprocket holes.

 

Allan

 

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2 hours ago, PSImages said:

I had my 35 mm slides from the 1950's digitized.  When I submitted some of them Alamy said that the metadata was missing on some of them.  The digitizing company said that the metadata was on each photo.  Why the discrepancy

 

I'll appreciate your response

PSImages

 

I am guessing from the phrasing of your question and from your presumed fairly advanced age, given that you were shooting slides in the 50s, that you probably know next to nothing about digital photography. Alamy looks for camera metadata for any potential contributor's first submission. Camera metadata is basically information that travels with an image taken with a digital camera that includes the make of camera, the lens used, shutter speed, aperture, ISO among other things. As far as I can gather, the reason Alamy wants to check the first submission is to determine that tha potential contributor is using what they deem to be a suitable camera (even though it is not clear what Alamy might really mean by a suitable camera anymore).

 

Anyway you have not said and might not even know how the slides were actually digitised. Presumably they will have been scanned rather than re-photographed and there may be little or no metadata attached to the images. Again surmising that you have not done any further processing on the images (leaving in film rebate is a great clue here), it is very likely that they will not be of sufficient quality to pass normal Alamy QC unless you paid for very high quality scans and had the images cleaned and sharpened etc.

 

However, all it not lost. You can apply for permission to submit your 50s images by the Archival route. Have a look at the submission guidelines and request permission from Alamy to submit that way, as quality is irrelevant for this type of image - It's the archival content that is important there.

 

Edited by MDM
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 Despite what the guidelines say it's not clear that you can get archival privileges before getting your initial submission through QC. You can't apply through a dashboard you don't yet have.

Though just because I didn't do it that way doesn't mean it's not possible. Alamy does say to get in touch if you have an archival collection, but I do wonder if, agencies apart, they want to restrict it to contributors who have at least some idea of image quality and QC beforehand.

 

https://www.alamy.com/contributor/how-to-sell-images/guidelines-for-submitting-images/

Edited by spacecadet
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3 hours ago, spacecadet said:

 Despite what the guidelines say it's not clear that you can get archival privileges before getting your initial submission through QC. You can't apply through a dashboard you don't yet have.

Though just because I didn't do it that way doesn't mean it's not possible. Alamy does say to get in touch if you have an archival collection, but I do wonder if, agencies apart, they want to restrict it to contributors who have at least some idea of image quality and QC beforehand.

 

 

 

My guess is that Alamy would not turn their noses up at an interesting archival collection if someone was to contact them directly before getting images through QC. Quality may be desirable but is probably basically irrelevant when compared to content. I would think that Alamy's primary concern is making $$$.

 

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13 hours ago, MDM said:

 

 

My guess is that Alamy would not turn their noses up at an interesting archival collection if someone was to contact them directly before getting images through QC. Quality may be desirable but is probably basically irrelevant when compared to content. I would think that Alamy's primary concern is making $$$.

 

 

I do not think Alamy is running Alamy any more.

 

Allan

 

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