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I've spent days at this ID stuff, ok, let me call it cr*p.  Sorry, tired.

 

There is a yellow flower, daisy-like, and I can't quite nail it. I've looked at creeping zinnia, yellow bush daisy, Helenium, Heliopsis.  None seem to fit. Either the leaves are wrong, or they just don't fit what I'm finding, petal shape, amount of petals, whatever.

On this yellow flower, I have a black bee-like insect.  I've gone to different websites and can't ID it either.  It looks a bit like a carpenter bee, but if you look closely, mine has very faint gray vertical stripes on upper body, same but horizontal on lower body.  It's head is very broad.  It's no big deal, I just can ID the flowers and forget the bug. It's tiny anyway. Curious, though! :D

https://www.dropbox.com/s/mt25xg1xq36lm1l/_ALI1868-yellow flowers.jpg?dl=0

 

A similar white flower provided. I've studied Marguerite daisy. Can't be sure.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/hyzzr7x2l9gede8/_ALI1872-white flowers.jpg?dl=0

 

I'm so sorry to ask again. Please do not feel any obligation to ID these flowers, unless you just enjoy the hunt. I'm all hunted out.  :(

Location on all, botanical garden, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA.  And yes, why can't they put metal ID tags in front of their plantings??

 

Betty

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Melampodium leucanthum

Although I can be wrong.

 

These are rugged plants native to the tropical to subtropical regions that include Central America, Southwestern United States, California, Florida, the Caribbean, and South America. Most of the species can be found in Mexico, five in the Southwestern United States, and three are scattered in Colombia and Brazil.

 

Some sources say that the name Melampodium is derived from the Greek words μέλας (melas), meaning "black", and πόδιον (podion), meaning "foot". This refers to the color of the base of the stem and roots. Members of the genus are commonly known as blackfoots. Other authorities, however, maintain that this is in error, that the name comes from Melampus, a soothsayer of renown in Greek mythology

Edited by Gennadii Rybalov
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21 hours ago, Gennadii Rybalov said:

Melampodium leucanthum

Although I can be wrong.

 

These are rugged plants native to the tropical to subtropical regions that include Central America, Southwestern United States, California, Florida, the Caribbean, and South America. Most of the species can be found in Mexico, five in the Southwestern United States, and three are scattered in Colombia and Brazil.

 

Some sources say that the name Melampodium is derived from the Greek words μέλας (melas), meaning "black", and πόδιον (podion), meaning "foot". This refers to the color of the base of the stem and roots. Members of the genus are commonly known as blackfoots. Other authorities, however, maintain that this is in error, that the name comes from Melampus, a soothsayer of renown in Greek mythology

Those definitely appear similar. My problem with it is that Blackfoot daisies are a desert flower. Found in the desert Southwest, which is west of Oklahoma..

Mine are in a botanical garden with good soil instead of rocky, sandy and arid. I wonder if they can adapt? In October, we had over 6 inches of rain!

Thank you for looking!

Betty

Edited by Betty LaRue
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7 hours ago, John Richmond said:

Can't help you with the daisies, Betty, but the bug is a true fly, Diptera, not a bee.  I know nothing about North American flies but that might narrow it down a little.

Thank you, John.  Darn, I just knew you’d be able to ID the 2 flowers! I shouldn’t expect you to know N American flowers, should I?

You are a victim of your excellent reputation, you know. :)

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