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Didi


Didi
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Hi I'm new to stock photography and have loads of photographs taken over the years with a pocket camera, one being Finepix. I submitted three,  just to test if they would meet the standard and unfortunately they failed. No surprise! So I'm looking at purchasing a camera that would produce the sharpest images that Alamy would accept, without wasting their time, hopefully at an affordable price. Can anyone suggest anything?

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On 21/12/2021 at 13:58, Didi said:

Hi I'm new to stock photography and have loads of photographs taken over the years with a pocket camera, one being Finepix. I submitted three,  just to test if they would meet the standard and unfortunately they failed. No surprise! So I'm looking at purchasing a camera that would produce the sharpest images that Alamy would accept, without wasting their time, hopefully at an affordable price. Can anyone suggest anything?

If you're after a "pocket" camera that can meet Alamy requirments, then the Sony RX100 series is often recommended hereabouts. I've got the Mk III. Search the forum for RX100 and you'll find lots of comments. Beyond that you'll have to say more about the sort of photographs you take (wildlife, landscape, travel,  macro, streetlife etc.) and your budget and portability requirements before you'll get detailed advice.

 

Mark

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Mark is right that the RX100 series is a popular choice for inconspicuous camera use, though I suspect it gets the most acceptable results from someone who is well versed in photography to begin with. Broadly speaking though you need a something like a DSLR or mirrorless version thereof, with interchangeable lens. Bridge and most pocket cameras don't cut the mustard for Alamy sumbissions. Give us some more detail on what kind of photography you are thinking of and you will get a better range of suggestions.

 

If you edit the title of this thread  to something which indicates the subject ('e.g. What camera should I buy?'), you will get more responses than having a thread called 'Didi'.

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Thanks for the comments. My OH has a Cannon 4000 digital which I can use. I am interested in views, wild life and architecture. I really am a very basic photographer at the moment- learning from the ground up with terminology and with stock photography!  Trial and error a bit. There is so much information and technical stuff I'm finding it hard to divulge so trying to keep it simple for now! 

Question:- Does cropping a photo ( taken with a camera like the Cannon 4000) affect the Alamy acceptance?

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The Canon 4000D is a good start.  I have a Canon T4i which was my starter DSLR.  Got it in 2013. Most of my images in my port were taken with it.  I bought a used 70-250 lens and added a used Sony RX100 and that was it up until last year when I stretched the budget and got a Canon 90D and a used Canon 200-400 L lens.  I'll never make the money back on the lousy license fees we get these days for images, but I spent it for me, not for Alamy.

 

I wouldn't spend a whole pile of money on kit right now if the point is to make money doing stock.  Really hard to to that unless you have thousands of images sitting in a backlog. 

 

So add a telephoto (buy used) and then as you shoot and figure out what you like doing (I'm really in to birds right now) buy the kit that suits your shooting requirements.

 

Jill

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