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MariaJ

Help needed for fish ID

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I was at a fish market on docked boats a couple weeks ago as part of the Worldwide Photowalk. For most of the shots I included the name of the fish or seafood to remember it, or asked the seller,  but I don't  have the info for these.  Caught off the west coast of Canada.  Either tuna or salmon?  Any fish experts here?   Thanks.

 

DG32Y1.jpg

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That would be wild Pacific salmon, and if you shot the picture at this time of year (always a good hint), it would be king (Chinook) salmon, the best there is.  :)

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The two bigger fish look like nice red-fleshed, silvery-sided coho salmon to me. They might possibly be small red chinook as well but the scales look like they are from a more mature fish on their late summer spawning migration. The one on the right could be a small white chinook (light coloured flesh). Exact species of salmon can only be determined if the image showed the gums and tongues (black gums and tongues on chinook), spots on tail, and a few other identifying features - but hard to tell since fish are frozen. I can only see one fish (second from right) with an adipose fin (in front of tail) which would indicate a wild salmon (if it's missing, it's a hatchery fish). Fish on left has a "bump" where its adipose fin could have been removed incompletely. In any event, they are Pacific salmon, definitely not tuna (which on west coast of BC would be albacore with dark black backs, crescent shaped tails, long pectoral fins, streamlined bodies, and big eyes).

 

Hope this helps,

 

Dave

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Thanks Phil, Ed and Dave.  OK, definitely Pacific salmon, and I'm quite sure they are wild.   They were all grouped together in the same bin so I assume they are all the same species. The other adjoining bins each had different types of fish.  

 

It was an interesting experience walking along the docks, busy with buyers and sellers, and the fresh catches displayed on the boats.  I probably wouldn't have gone there if it hadn't been for the Photowalk.

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I hear what you're saying, Dave. But they look too large for coho . . . if a bit small for chinook. I don't like the fact that they're not on ice; I wouldn't buy one without a good sniff. All our salmon here in the East are from fish farms. 

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I hear what you're saying, Dave. But they look too large for coho . . . if a bit small for chinook. I don't like the fact that they're not on ice; I wouldn't buy one without a good sniff. All our salmon here in the East are from fish farms. 

Late season coho heading for their natal streams can weigh in excess of 15 pounds, with an average weight around eight pounds (which is what those bigger fish look in size). The fish in the image don't fill the length of the stainless steel fish tote, which a mature chinook of 15 to 25 pounds would ( a tyee - chinook weighing over 30 pounds - would almost hang over the end). If these fish were caught on the west coast of Vancouver Island a couple of weeks ago, most of the mature chinook would have already passed through, and it would be mainly mature coho and smaller (feeder) chinook in those waters. 

 

Since the scales on the fish look intact, they were probably troll-caught, cleaned almost immediately after landing, and flash frozen on board the boat. The fish look as if they had just been taken out of the boat's freezer for sale to the public. Solidly frozen salmon will take at least two to three hours to just melt the frost off...and with only four fish in the tote, the fish would probably be sold long before that. (Fish sold in a store would be thawed completely, then they would have to be be placed on a bed of ice) Around Vancouver, there are several fish docks where commercial fishers sell their "whole fish" frozen catch directly to the public (where was this dock, Maria?).

 

My wife and I sport fish for salmon, halibut, and most recently, albacore tuna (first time in early September this year), off the west coast of Vancouver Island several times every summer. We see, photograph, and eat a lot of fish, especially salmon.

 

Sorry you don't get much of our west coast salmon, Ed. We're really spoiled to be able to get fish right from the ocean...and they definitely pass the "sniff" test. While we have eaten a fair swack of farmed salmon, we would never buy any ourselves in Vancouver. Have a peek at my collection...you'll see that we have a lot of salmon images...often taken within minutes of landing them. And, you'll just have to come for a visit to our fair city and go fishing for salmon (very good salmon fishing during August right in Vancouver Harbour)...there is nothing that can beat a meal of salmon, fresh from the sea.

 

Dave

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I hear what you're saying, Dave. But they look too large for coho . . . if a bit small for chinook. I don't like the fact that they're not on ice; I wouldn't buy one without a good sniff. All our salmon here in the East are from fish farms. 

Late season coho heading for their natal streams can weigh in excess of 15 pounds, with an average weight around eight pounds (which is what those bigger fish look in size). The fish in the image don't fill the length of the stainless steel fish tote, which a mature chinook of 15 to 25 pounds would ( a tyee - chinook weighing over 30 pounds - would almost hang over the end). If these fish were caught on the west coast of Vancouver Island a couple of weeks ago, most of the mature chinook would have already passed through, and it would be mainly mature coho and smaller (feeder) chinook in those waters. 

 

Since the scales on the fish look intact, they were probably troll-caught, cleaned almost immediately after landing, and flash frozen on board the boat. The fish look as if they had just been taken out of the boat's freezer for sale to the public. Solidly frozen salmon will take at least two to three hours to just melt the frost off...and with only four fish in the tote, the fish would probably be sold long before that. (Fish sold in a store would be thawed completely, then they would have to be be placed on a bed of ice) Around Vancouver, there are several fish docks where commercial fishers sell their "whole fish" frozen catch directly to the public (where was this dock, Maria?).

 

My wife and I sport fish for salmon, halibut, and most recently, albacore tuna (first time in early September this year), off the west coast of Vancouver Island several times every summer. We see, photograph, and eat a lot of fish, especially salmon.

 

Sorry you don't get much of our west coast salmon, Ed. We're really spoiled to be able to get fish right from the ocean...and they definitely pass the "sniff" test. While we have eaten a fair swack of farmed salmon, we would never buy any ourselves in Vancouver. Have a peek at my collection...you'll see that we have a lot of salmon images...often taken within minutes of landing them. And, you'll just have to come for a visit to our fair city and go fishing for salmon (very good salmon fishing during August right in Vancouver Harbour)...there is nothing that can beat a meal of salmon, fresh from the sea.

 

Dave

 

I tip my hat to your superior knowledge about the great, eatable fish in your area, Dave. I am just a lowly lover of salmon who has said I could eat salmon three times a day . . . and did so once in Seattle one early September. And I love all those other fish you mentioned, too. Yum yum. I don't buy what is said to be "wild Pacific salmon" here in NYC; don't trust that the truth has been told. I'm not a fisherman, sadly; I get seasick.  :wacko:

 

There's nothing like really fresh fish, very fresh food of any kind. I've been a restaurant reviewer in the past and so have had some great meals. But I still believe that simple, fresh food is best. 

 

Your food pics look very tasty, Dave. I'd die for a bite of that bread pudding.

Edited by Ed Rooney
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There's nothing like really fresh fish, very fresh food of any kind. I've been a restaurant reviewer in the past and so have had some great meals. But I still believe that simple, fresh food is best. 

 

Your food pics look very tasty, Dave. I'd die for a bite of that bread pudding.

Be careful what you ask for...we came home from our trip to the west coast in early September with about 100 pounds of filletted fish (and we limit our catch, not catch our limits). We ate salmon, halibut, ling cod, and albacore tuna for five days straight...and that was only the "trim" bits (jowls, belly flaps, tongues) that most fish processors throw away because they don't look nice...they are the best parts of any fish to eat! It took two more days to vacuum-pack and freeze the rest. As we already had fish from a previous trip, I sent the coho salmon out to be smoked and canned, and the chinook to be made into salmon candy...both great for entertaining. The albacore has been sensational as sashimi.

 

My wife gets seasick...that's what Gravol is for! As she says, nothing like a hard-fightin' salmon to settle her stomach. She's now added tuna to that cure.

 

I love food and cooking...have to agree simple is best. The bread pudding came from your southern states. I do have to say, they do know how to make comfort food down there. Mmmm..grits (we can't find grits in Vancouver).

 

And food pics are always a good seller.

 

Dave

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Yes, these fish were frozen out at sea so they are really fresh.  They looked more frosty when I started taking photos but the seller said he'd make them look better for us photographers and he hosed them down a bit.

 

Thanks again for your expertise Dave!

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Do be specific with the type of salmon in your keywords, Maria. And do put in the Latin name . . . Google will help you. 

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Glad to be of help, Maria. I thought the fish were solidly frozen. Skipper was very thoughtful to hose them down to get the frost off. 

 

Your image of the skipper with the four totes shows albacore tuna in the first, the four salmon, I believe ling cod in the third, and rockfish in the fourth (including a big Pacific yelloweye - orange one). Coho are also known as silvers - Oncorhynchus kisutch, while chinook are also known as kings or spring salmon - Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

 

My wife and I are off to Steveston tomorrow for lunch...maybe we'll see the fishing boat you got your images from.

 

Dave

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You sure know your fish Dave!  Yes, I remember the seller showing us the big yelloweye, even clearing the frost off its eyes to show they were in fact yellow.

 

Enjoy your lunch!

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