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ID help needed. Ornamental grass, coastal Italy


Cecile Marion
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I would appreciate some help identifying this ornamental grass seen on the Gargano Peninsula, in and near the town of Vieste on the Adriatic Coast of Italy. The photos were taken in October. So far, the closest I’ve come to identification is "Giant Reed, Arundo donax," but I doubt that’s correct. Many thanks. 
Cecile

 

vieste-gargano-peninsula-italy-2A4W40N.j


vieste-gargano-peninsula-italy-2A4W42A.j

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Shooting my the water all the time on the east coast of the US and along riverbanks, I would say it is definitely in the reed family. Reeds are a perennial grass.

Here are some from the US just to compare, so you can see the flower/seed/heads (I guess that's what you'd call the puffy tops) are so similar. Also reeds from different areas of the world have become invasive species elsewhere. More specifics should come from someone along the coast in Europe. 

This was taken in a saltwater marsh in New England along the coast last August.

Common reed, a perennial grass, Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud., Phragmites communis Trin., grows in a salt marsh golden hour Connecticut Stock Photo

 

This was taken in a freshwater wetland in New York, far from the coast, in autumn.

autumn-sunlight-on-common-reeds-phragmites-australis-in-a-wetland-CXH4W3.jpg

 

These are both common reeds. You can see how the fluffy tops of yours are similar.  Your leaves however seem longer and bendy, while the leaves in all those I've photographed here in the US stand straight up. I'd bet it is a species in the Phragmites (reed) family. 

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I'll agree with you, Cecile, that it's not Arundo donax.  I've grown the variegated form 'Versicolor; (lost in a bad winter in 2010) and the leaves are far broader and more impressive.  The species is a giant, to 5 metres plus by the time flowering arrives and the reeds in your images don't have the same stature.  I'd look at Phragmites species as a staring point - but on grasses I am no expert.

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