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Johnnie5

Would this be stock photography back in the 1920's 30"s and 40's

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Posted (edited)

This photographer, Burton Fraser was the most respected photographer in the town I grew up in, we didn't know he had an entirely different business providing postcards to the rest of the United States of images taken all over the west.  They seem pretty important now as many of these places and people are gone.

ow.  https://calisphere.org/collections/7781/?q=&start=0

Edited by Johnnie5
fixed punctuation

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Posted (edited)

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Edited by Jan Brown
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7 hours ago, Jan Brown said:

Except that Frith employed a team of photographers. Enormously important archive of photographs left by each of them, IMO.

 

Totally agree. I actually have a framed cop of a print by Frank Sutcliffe, who was one of Francis Frith's commissioned employees for a while, of a group of people (no MRs) in Robin Hoods Bay fishing village circa 1884.  It is obviously posed but still very atmospheric and of it's day.

 

I think this photo was taken after Frank had left Francis employ.

 

Allan

 

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Posted (edited)

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Edited by Jan Brown

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Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, Jan Brown said:

I love Frank Meadow Sutcliffe's work, such beautiful compositions (often, as you say, posed but nonetheless gorgeous) and the sheer quality of the prints is breathtaking. Big glass plate knocks tiny sensor into a cocked hat every time. Interesting that he had worked for Frith, I didn't know that.

I was surprised to learn that he only shot whole plate (that's 8.5"x6.5" for you youngsters, 21.5x16.5cm for the toddlers)- some of those guys were doing 16x12 contact prints! Breathtaking.

Edited by spacecadet

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