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#61 anna182016

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Posted A week ago

Thank you everyone but well i guess it's almost summer there's a lot of festival going on first i can go playland and PNE,nght market,aquarium, festivals my kid is my model i will shoot everything on sunny days,i have 8 years Nikon D90 which i would like to Upgrade i can't decide which camera im going to buy,what do u think is the best upgrade


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#62 MDM

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Posted A week ago

Depends on your budget. As you are already a Nikon user, the D3400 is the current entry level model and is a superb DX camera at a very good price. If you have the money, the D750 is a fantastic full frame DSLR.


Edited by MDM, A week ago.

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#63 Roman78

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Posted A week ago

When you are used to Nikon, stay whit Nikon. Because the operation stays the same. Other brands have other body-layouts, meaning that the buttons are on other places of the body and have other functions. 

 

And you can keep all you lenses. But when switching to a D3x00 or D5x00 keep in mind that you must have AF-S lenses. AF lenses (without the S) won't autofocus. Those models lack a AF-Motor. 


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#64 Robert Shantz

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Posted A week ago

Thank you everyone but well i guess it's almost summer there's a lot of festival going on first i can go playland and PNE,nght market,aquarium, festivals my kid is my model i will shoot everything on sunny days,i have 8 years Nikon D90 which i would like to Upgrade i can't decide which camera im going to buy,what do u think is the best upgrade

 

Anna,

 

If I read your original post correctly, you're looking at stock as a way to make money you need.  As such, equipment purchases must be a business decision and not based on what you would like.

 

So the basic question must be what would a new, better, camera do that your present one doesn't do?   You will get larger files which to some buyers may be important, but not to most editorial buyers which is Alamy's core business.  You'll get better high ISO image quality, but unless you're often shooting in low light that won't be much help. 

 

In many, if not most, cases you'll find that a better lens is a more useful upgrade than a better camera body.  But even here, be careful.  I'd wait to see what photos you aren't able to get because your current lenses aren't up to the job before spending money on a lens that might be useful.  Expensive lenses tend to pay for themselves at the extreme ends of their range.  If you need to shoot at f2.8, the better lenses will be markedly better than the basic kit lens.  If you're shooting in good sunlight at f5.6 to f8.0, there won't be enough difference between the lenses to worry about -- at least for normal editorial sales.

 

If you find that your photos of children sell, you might discover that a better flash is your most pressing need.

 

I ran my own metallurgical testing and assaying business for 20 years, and there were more than a few items I purchased early on because I thought they'd useful.  And when I retired I sold them for perhaps 5 cents on the dollar of my purchase cost without ever using them.

 

From a business standpoint, I think you should wait until you clearly see the need for a new piece of equipment.  Then fill that need.   

 

I certainly hope this venture works out for you.

 

Robert


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#65 Colblimp

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Posted A week ago

I loved my D90, brilliant camera.  I upgraded straight from that to full frame - a D700 but bear in mind if you go full frame, you'll have to buy new lenses, unless you were like me and bought full frame lenses from the start.


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Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons...

 

http://www.andygibsonphotography.com/


#66 Robert Shantz

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Posted A week ago

‚ÄčAnna,

 

I should also have mentioned that you might want to consider an entirely different system  ---  if you search the forums you'll find that a number of photographers are now using smaller cameras such as the Sony RX100 series rather than their DSLRs.  I'm now using the RX100 III for many of my shots mostly because it saves a great deal of time on cloning out the sensor dust that is a real issue with my Canon 5D Mark II.  To again emphasize  the business end, let me note that the Canon produces better quality photos at 100%, but at any likely size for final use the images are very comparable.  So the time, and hassle, savings is important.

 

Here's a link to one thread on the RX100 III.  If you look through the forums you'll find many others.

 

http://discussion.al...ny-rx100-mkiii/

 

Again, don't be in a hurry to buy new equipment until you can answer the question of what saleable images you are passing up because your present equipment won't let you capture them.

 

Robert

 

Thank you everyone but well i guess it's almost summer there's a lot of festival going on first i can go playland and PNE,nght market,aquarium, festivals my kid is my model i will shoot everything on sunny days,i have 8 years Nikon D90 which i would like to Upgrade i can't decide which camera im going to buy,what do u think is the best upgrade


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#67 John Richmond

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Posted A week ago

Things are not as simple though in respect to micro-stock, when you are starting. On Alamy -- 1,2,3 .. how many months?  6 to a year on average?  No sale.  Confidence is lost and you think you'll never sell anything;   but on shutterstock you get sale(s) right away, even if they are just pennies.  So after 4 or 5 months you made 100 bucks on shutterstock and zero on Alamy.  It is only normal to make certain conclusions, even if they might be false on a long run

 

Here is another interesting read:  http://trainerjohnph...art-second.html

 

(There are parts 1, 3, and 4 too in his blog).  I thought this was very interesting;  took him 7 months to make 1st sale, quite modest.  But now he is, according to blog, doing quite well. I believe he is active contributor today.  It is also interesting because he seems to shoot mostly flowers, which according to many, is quite hard to get a sale.   So patience plays a big role.

 

I agree with "shoot what you like and make it look good" & for me this is probably best thing said in this thread.

That'll be me.  I really must do a Part the fifth.


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#68 David_Buzzard

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Posted A week ago

If you already have an APC Nikon set up, then stay with that.  Image quality comes down to sensor size more than any other thing, so you don't want to go to a smaller sensor camera.  We have a Nikon D3200 in the office which takes pretty good photos, but it's really cheaply built.  If you want to move up to full frame, a used D700 in good shape would be great.  A lot of people really like the D750 as well.  I have a D800, but the files are huge, and it's kind of slow and sluggish for day to day use.


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#69 John Mitchell

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Posted A week ago

Personally, I think that learning how to get the best out of the equipment that you have is more important than spending a lot of money on new stuff that might prove to be unnecessary, especially with today's low image prices and low returns. I swapped my DSLR's a few year ago for a compact Sony mirrorless APS-C system, and my back (and bum hip) couldn't be happier. Small is beautiful once again. B)


Edited by John Mitchell, A week ago.

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John Mitchell

 

 

 


#70 NYCat

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Posted A week ago

I never had the D90 but images from my D80 sell regularly. I suspect I often took better photos with it than I take with my bigger, heavier D7100 and D500. My hands and arms are, of course, feminine and there is always a bit of a strain using the heavier cameras. In any case, hang on to the D90 in case you find it is better for you after all.

 

Paulette


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#71 Betty LaRue

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Posted A week ago

Anna -- it is still possible to make money from photography. As example, have a look at this:
 
http://www.nagelphot...hrough-february
 
I don't know if this is legit of course, but I looked at his portfolio and it is very high quality.  Thing to note is that these amounts are from micro-stock which pays significantly less (but sells comparatively more) than Alamy.  I also believe he sells through his own website as well.
 
Bottom line is:  You have to find a way to stand above the crowd, which is not easy in this age of "smartphone photographers".  It is best done through quality, not quantity as many would suggest.  It is also hard and time consuming work.  Good thing is that once portfolio (and skills!) are developed,  it becomes passive income.
 
In your place I'd suggest keeping day job and treating photography as hobby initially, trying through different agencies (not only Alamy where you are not likely to sell anything first 6-12 months) and then make your own decisions.  At each case, good luck!

 
And this is the quality that earns him these $1000 a month. (I assume it is net, but before taxes. He may have a day job or a working spouse.)
From >>5,500 photos with Shutterstock and 2,500 photos with iStock<<
He started around 2010 with stock.
 
Anna,
 
What to do if you do not have that quality (yet)?
Practice practice practice. Those infamous 10.000 hours is no myth.
 
In the mean time: have a look at All of Alamy where all the searches by all the clients are being logged.
You can go back a whole year. (You have to be logged in.) There's a help section on the right hand side.
 
Now I assume you're based in or close to Vancouver.
Set AoA as far back as possible. This month that's May 1st 2016. As a search term choose %vancouver%. (Include the %% - it's a database thing.)
You can click on sales and zooms, but however interesting those are, for the moment you will be looking for views. More precisely the search terms with the least views (just click on it - maybe twice). Everything up to 99 views is a good subject to shoot. 100 views will only tell you the client did only look at the first page of the results.
If you click on the search term, you get to see what there's already there.
Now only go out and shoot if you can do better or at least as good. No strike that: do go out and shoot it, but only upload when your images as good or better.
- Learn how to judge that.
 
Also shoot what you have access to. Your child is an obvious subject. Trawl All of Alamy for what to shoot in the same way as with %vancouver%.
Sign releases.
Access can be things; buildings but also knowledge.
Being a local shooting locally means you can wait for the best opportunity. Like the best weather; the best season; the best light.
 
Maybe also apply with some of those microstock agencies. They do judge your images for quality and saleability. Alamy only judges the technical quality.
Do you use Instagram? If not start now.
Look for photo critique sites online.
 
Don't expect any income the first year. Coffee money would be nice.
However there's always that lottery aspect as well.
For that it's important that your images can be used commercially. So they should be model and or property released.
Canada is a special case when people photography is concerned. This is a overview of property and (commercial or editorial) photography.
 
Oh and your yellow tulip is a daffodil.
Captions and keywords are maybe at least as important as the images, because this is how your images can be seen in the first place. Not the exact good keyword: no view. No views: no sales. Here the wrong views will lead to a lower ranking. putting your images at the back of those 80.000 images that are daily added.
This is why you at first will be concentrating on subjects with less than 100 views.
 
good luck!
wim
wim, thanks so much for these instructions. In different threads, All of Alamy searches were discussed, but never did I see every step of how to do it. And I guess I'm too dumb to figure it out.
After your comprehensive instructions here, the light came on. As a result, I had a good search and found a couple of gaps with little competition. I got all over it and shot two of them last evening. In gorgeous evening light. They are awaiting QC.
Thanks!!
Betty
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#72 tarsierspectral

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Posted A week ago

 

Anna -- it is still possible to make money from photography. As example, have a look at this:

 

http://www.nagelphot...hrough-february

 

I don't know if this is legit of course, but I looked at his portfolio and it is very high quality.  Thing to note is that these amounts are from micro-stock which pays significantly less (but sells comparatively more) than Alamy.  I also believe he sells through his own website as well.

 

Bottom line is:  You have to find a way to stand above the crowd, which is not easy in this age of "smartphone photographers".  It is best done through quality, not quantity as many would suggest.  It is also hard and time consuming work.  Good thing is that once portfolio (and skills!) are developed,  it becomes passive income.

 

In your place I'd suggest keeping day job and treating photography as hobby initially, trying through different agencies (not only Alamy where you are not likely to sell anything first 6-12 months) and then make your own decisions.  At each case, good luck!

 

And this is the quality that earns him these $1000 a month. (I assume it is net, but before taxes. He may have a day job or a working spouse.)

From >>5,500 photos with Shutterstock and 2,500 photos with iStock<<

He started around 2010 with stock.

 

Anna,

 

What to do if you do not have that quality (yet)?

Practice practice practice. Those infamous 10.000 hours is no myth.

 

In the mean time: have a look at All of Alamy where all the searches by all the clients are being logged.

You can go back a whole year. (You have to be logged in.) There's a help section on the right hand side.

 

Now I assume you're based in or close to Vancouver.

Set AoA as far back as possible. This month that's May 1st 2016. As a search term choose %vancouver%. (Include the %% - it's a database thing.)

You can click on sales and zooms, but however interesting those are, for the moment you will be looking for views. More precisely the search terms with the least views (just click on it - maybe twice). Everything up to 99 views is a good subject to shoot. 100 views will only tell you the client did only look at the first page of the results.

If you click on the search term, you get to see what there's already there.

Now only go out and shoot if you can do better or at least as good. No strike that: do go out and shoot it, but only upload when your images as good or better.

- Learn how to judge that.

 

Also shoot what you have access to. Your child is an obvious subject. Trawl All of Alamy for what to shoot in the same way as with %vancouver%.

Sign releases.

Access can be things; buildings but also knowledge.

Being a local shooting locally means you can wait for the best opportunity. Like the best weather; the best season; the best light.

 

Maybe also apply with some of those microstock agencies. They do judge your images for quality and saleability. Alamy only judges the technical quality.

Do you use Instagram? If not start now.

Look for photo critique sites online.

 

Don't expect any income the first year. Coffee money would be nice.

However there's always that lottery aspect as well.

For that it's important that your images can be used commercially. So they should be model and or property released.

Canada is a special case when people photography is concerned. This is a overview of property and (commercial or editorial) photography.

 

Oh and your yellow tulip is a daffodil.

Captions and keywords are maybe at least as important as the images, because this is how your images can be seen in the first place. Not the exact good keyword: no view. No views: no sales. Here the wrong views will lead to a lower ranking. putting your images at the back of those 80.000 images that are daily added.

This is why you at first will be concentrating on subjects with less than 100 views.

 

good luck!

wim

 

 

Wim,

 

Do you know why is it that the views can be shown as 0 but if you click on that search term images are shown?


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#73 wiskerke

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Posted A week ago

This is why you at first will be concentrating on subjects with less than 100 views.

 

good luck!

wim

 

 

Wim,

 

Do you know why is it that the views can be shown as 0 but if you click on that search term images are shown?

 

 

Good question with a couple of possible answers.

 

- Newer images? Uploaded after or even because of the search?

 

- Images not available for the client who did the search:

-- territorial - I do not see one of the big German agencies' images for instance.

-- contractual - newspapers in the newspaper scheme only see images from contributors also in the scheme.

 

- Filters. This is the most likely: we see most filters used on our own pseudonym summaries, but no filters at all on AoA.

 

wim

 

edit: that German agency: LOOK Die Bildagentur der Fotografen.


Edited by wiskerke, A week ago.

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#74 arterra

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Posted A week ago

Thank you everyone but well i guess it's almost summer there's a lot of festival going on first i can go playland and PNE,nght market,aquarium, festivals my kid is my model i will shoot everything on sunny days,i have 8 years Nikon D90 which i would like to Upgrade i can't decide which camera im going to buy,what do u think is the best upgrade


Anna, just make sure you don't end up spending money instead of earning :mellow:
You have a fine camera, keep using the gear you already have. If you want to spend something, then spend TIME ........ developing your camera skills and developing a good eye for saleable subjects. Also study the images reported in the "Have you found any ...." threads and in every magazine and book you can lay your hands on, because that'll be your market AND the quality they'll expect. Notice the compositions you see in there and compare those with your shots. Are you already on par? The blunt truth? You're not!
When looking at your portfolio, I see hastily taken snapshots without any thought, without taking any attention to details, without doing any trouble making a pleasing composition. Working on improving your photography should be your priority before spending money ........ or it'll be money down the drain.

You already got the splendid advice from John Mitchell and Wim (see below). Study those threads very well and don't forget to look at the quantity AND quality in the photographers' portfolios. Calculate how many images you expect to have within a year, what they'll be about (universal, ordinary, specialized or very local subjects (remember Alamy is UK based)) and do the math. Will it be worth the time and expenses (travel costs, to name just one) when you really NEED the money? Correct me if I'm wrong, but you're not looking to make some money from your hobby, but to make an additional INCOME which means that the money you make here should surpass your expenses. I hope you realize, that for most here, that is not the case. Most don't make profits and are already happy if they can "recuperate" some of their hobby costs.

We do have a monthly thread for that here. If you click on the blue numbers underneath a poster's image to the left, you can look at someone's entire portfolio.

January 2017
February 2017
March 2017
April 2017


Cheers,
Philippe


Edited by arterra, A week ago.

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Arterra Picture LibraryWildeyes

nature, travel and environmental photography

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#75 anna182016

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Posted A week ago

thanks aterra well my QA just finished frozen yeterday an then i upload 60 photos again and got frozen to 10 days again well so stressful it say my photo got soft and lacking i dont know but its a pretty photo its just a blurry background


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#76 anna182016

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Posted A week ago

thanks a lot for the advices it means a lot


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#77 MDM

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Posted A week ago

thanks a lot for the advices it means a lot

This may sound a bit harsh but it is intended as a positive if blunt comment and I hope you take it as such (positive that is).

 

Passing Alamy QC should not be a problem for any photographer. It should be a trivial exercise for anybody with the right equipment and knowledge of the craft.

 

I think the greatest advice that anybody could give you right now is to become a photographer before you try to make money from it. Looking at your portfolio, it is pretty clear that you do have quite a lot to learn. So first of all learn, learn and learn more about photography. Enjoy the journey and when you really know what you are doing with a camera (including post-processing), then consider trying to sell, taking some of the excellent advice you have received here in relation to stock photography.


Edited by MDM, A week ago.

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#78 Gervais Montacute

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Posted A week ago

I have a Nikon D800 and the 3 holy trinity lenses. Awesome camera and even more awesome lenses. But most of the time I use either a Fuji X100 or a Sony RX100 MkII. Only get the the big Nikon gear out if there's something planned. Generally I'm not a planner when it comes to photography because there's not enough time in the day. 

I can't recommend either of those two smaller cameras highly enough. Easy to use, quirky in some ways and not that expensive in the second hand market.


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#79 Matt Ashmore

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Posted A week ago

thanks aterra well my QA just finished frozen yeterday an then i upload 60 photos again and got frozen to 10 days again well so stressful it say my photo got soft and lacking i dont know but its a pretty photo its just a blurry background

 

You sometimes you have to be ruthless... you might fall in love with a picture but no matter how pretty it is, if it isn't technically good enough, it will fail in alamy QC.

 

Do you look at images at 100% and check that they are sharp, free of noise and CA at 100%?

Also, do you shoot in RAW? If not, I would stick with the D90 for a while and learn to shoot raw. 

What software do you use? 

 

With regards to the camera.. I started with a D50. I upgraded to a D7000 because like the D50 and D90, it has a built in lens focusing motor so I can reuse my lenses and it fitted my budget. You can get one of those for under £300 (not sure where you're based so I'll leave you to convert this to your preferred currency) from a reputable used camera dealer:

https://www.mpb.com/...000/sku-662131/


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#80 fotoDogue

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Posted A week ago

I loved my D90, brilliant camera.  I upgraded straight from that to full frame - a D700 but bear in mind if you go full frame, you'll have to buy new lenses, unless you were like me and bought full frame lenses from the start.

 

You don't necessarily have to buy new lenses if you upgrade from DX to FX. My D610 has a masking function so I can use DX lenses on this full-frame body. The only difference is the files are a bit smaller than those shot with FX lenses.

 

Good, relatively fast, lenses are a good investment. Several of mine are over 20 years old now. left over from my film days,  and still serve my needs.

 

fD


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