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Hi everyone, I'm new to this site and am a very new photographer.  I am currently taking a college class in Photography as Art and we are working with black and white 35mm film.

 

I haven't seen any topics on this and was unable to find anything doing a search.   Is there a market for these types of photos? Or is everything digital / photo shop enhanced these days?

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Hi,

Go for it….I am slowly working through my back catalogue of film and putting them on here. They do get zooms and they do sell…… I uploaded a batch last week and have already had a zoom on this black and white pic from that batch….

 

 

 

E6BCTW.jpg

Edited by Martyn

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I don't bother much with B&W negs but I would say that 90% of what I have on Alamy is scans from 35mm film

and it is licensing well.  It is also a lot of work: scanning, dust spotting and correcting the final file.  I figure

that it takes me on average ten hours per image.  Many of those images have been licensed  ten or more times.

I would not work from negative or chrome just as stock image, but if it is an image that is part of history or important

documentation of an event I will spend as long as it takes to make the image ready for Alamy.

 

Chuck (still the original one and now in Boston, MA, USA)

Edited by Chuck Nacke

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If you are just at the point of learning those skills and slightly different ways of looking, why not concentrate on subjects and projects that interest you and not simply for the chance to sell them here? That way you will learn more about how that particular genre of photography works and has worked for many years. Study the genre and look at major portfolios of work from the many important photographers that have worked that way and you will learn much more. (You indicate that you are a student so this is why I suggest this). Your tutors at college should really be pointing you in that direction.

 

I sell prints of my early B&W work through major, (not online) photography galleries worldwide for serious money. (One print will sell for a price way, way, above anything I would ever get on Alamy). (They call this area of my work vintage now because I'm old!) Real, serious collectors expect proper prints of course, not inkjets from scans. I mean fibre-base, gelatin/silver prints, selenium toned. So, there is still a 'market' for this kind of work but these serious print collectors are extremely fastidious about what they buy and the quality of the print etc. You should also look at the major galleries that sell this kind of work, you will find a great number of them if you check out the AIPAD website. is the umbrella body that all the best galleries belong to. Not worth bothering with any gallery that is not a part of this. Serious collectors deal with galleries within this body.

 

Hope this has been a help, just wanted to encourage you in a direction I think you will find helpful in the longer term. Good luck. 

  • Upvote 1

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As Chuck said, if you have old images of value or interest that can't be retaken, by all means.

I know there are still defenders of film out there, but I honestly can't see the point of taking the film route with all the scanning and editing (and cost) involved for what is now a totally digital market.

The final product will be digital - why take the long way round?

 

If your aim is primarily the art market - good old-fashioned framed black and white prints done the traditional way, then yes, digitise them too.

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