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Essdras Suarez reviewing photos


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You do have to supply your email address and name.

 

It is quite long but it does move along quickly and you could also dip in and out. 1 hour 10 minutes with questions. I did not find it at all slow moving.

 

I think that there is something for everyone here from beginner to those very experienced professionals amongst us  - even if that is just to look at a variety of pictures and see what you think.

 

As you'd expect the images range in quality a lot and also in style.

 

https://resources.photoshelter.com/the-power-of-a-strong-portfolio-on-demand/?&utm_source=essdrasmsuarez&utm_medium=PS_Webinar&utm_content=ondemand&utm_campaign=

 

He makes some very good points about what the eye and brain find in a photo and I found it interesting to think through how I feel it relates to stock. Also how 'tricks' of composition ( rule of thirds, anchor point, framing etc) can make a routine subject interesting, and how with a subject that on its own is a really powerful makes composition and other factors almost unimportant. 

 

I liked the way he made it relate to the way our eye and brain work together when faced with a still image. He talks about some images are just like eye blinks, routine, and nothing more.

 

In other words some of the advice does and some doesn't relate to stock ( !) Because in editorial stock what the buyer finds interesting is what they want to illustrate a story or not necessarily something that might make a great photograph just on its own. So, a straightforward eye level shot ( he really does not like these) which clearly illustrates a subject and keeps out distraction can be perfect for stock even if in a portfolio review like this, taken out of context, it could well look like a complete boring failure. 

 

Edited by geogphotos
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Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Essdras M. Suarez knows a thing or two about the power of a strong portfolio. For years, he has helped fellow photographers improve their work through in-person lessons and online portfolio reviews. 

Recently, Essdras walked us through a selection of anonymous photo submissions. For each image, he discussed what worked, what didn't and suggested compositional adjustments that could have made the photo stronger. He also shared tips on how to improve your portfolio and what you can do to make the greatest impact each time you snap a photo. As Essdras says, “Keep shooting, keep moving, keep adjusting!”

Watch to learn:

  • The psychology behind successful vs unsuccessful photos

  • How to choose and properly edit the right frame 

  • An explanation of concepts like visual anchors and points of escape

  • When to stop editing your images

Edited by geogphotos
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On 22/10/2020 at 00:24, geogphotos said:

 

In other words some of the advice does and some doesn't relate to stock ( !) Because in editorial stock what the buyer finds interesting is what they want to illustrate a story or not necessarily something that might make a great photograph just on its own. So, a straightforward eye level shot ( he really does not like these) which clearly illustrates a subject and keeps out distraction can be perfect for stock even if in a portfolio review like this, taken out of context, it could well look like a complete boring failure. 

 

 

I'd venture to say that creating a straightforward -- and probably boring  -- eye level documentary image suitable for editorial use can be an art in itself.

 

That said, I know that I take too many eye-level shots. I'm going to blame it on ageing. Kneeling isn't as comfortable as it used to be, plus if I lie down for too long I might never get up. 😬

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5 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

I'd venture to say that creating a straightforward -- and probably boring  -- eye level documentary image suitable for editorial use can be an art in itself.

 

That said, I know that I take too many eye-level shots. I'm going to blame it on ageing. Kneeling isn't as comfortable as it used to be, plus if I lie down for too long I might never get up. 😬

 

 

For me it is the difference between taking a photo of something interesting rather than taking an interesting photograph. I'm not saying that doing both is impossible but that it is a matter of priorities. 

 

As to kneeling, getting down isn't too bad but.....

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2 minutes ago, geogphotos said:

 

 

For me it is the difference between taking a photo of something interesting rather than taking an interesting photograph. 

 

It is gratifying when you can combine the two, though.

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