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Bill Brooks

Sony MX100 night mode effect by shooting RAW

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Interesting discussion in favourite photos about using night mode on Sony MX100 but only able to save out to JPEG.

 

Matt If you want to use RAW, set any camera, not only Sony, to highest ISO, high speed continuous shooting, in RAW, but not in night mode.

Shoot 5 or more RAW shots holding camera as steady as possible.

 

Take RAW series shots into image processing software and do the usual image adjustments. Same adjustment to each image. This is the reason to shoot RAW as the Sony in camera method does not give you this custom adjustment option.

 

Go to latest edition of PhotoshopCC and create an image stack from the adjusted RAW using the script (File > Scripts > Load Files into Stack). Set up the script to select the images and then aline them. You will end up with a photoshop file with one smart layer that contains a stack of all of your alined images.

 

Set the smart layer image stack to "Mean" The noise will disappear. Render the smart layer.

 

Save the photoshop file as a TIFF. You now have all of the noisy Raw shots and a noise free TIFF. Make an Alamy JPEG from your TIFF

 

Your Sony camera is doing all of the photoshop work automatically, and then outputting a JPEG. This way you have the option to adjust the RAW images first and then output a noise free TIFF, and also retain all of the noisy RAW files if you want to.

 

Here is an explanation on the Adobe site, but IT IS OUT OF DATE !!!

https://helpx.adobe.com/ca/photoshop/using/image-stacks.html
 

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2 hours ago, Bill Brooks said:

Interesting discussion in favourite photos about using night mode on Sony MX100 but only able to save out to JPEG.

 

Matt If you want to use RAW, set any camera, not only Sony, to highest ISO, high speed continuous shooting, in RAW, but not in night mode.

Shoot 5 or more RAW shots holding camera as steady as possible.

 

Take RAW series shots into image processing software and do the usual image adjustments. Same adjustment to each image. This is the reason to shoot RAW as the Sony in camera method does not give you this custom adjustment option.

 

Go to latest edition of PhotoshopCC and create an image stack from the adjusted RAW using the script (File > Scripts > Load Files into Stack). Set up the script to select the images and then aline them. You will end up with a photoshop file with one smart layer that contains a stack of all of your alined images.

 

Set the smart layer image stack to "Mean" The noise will disappear. Render the smart layer.

 

Save the photoshop file as a TIFF. You now have all of the noisy Raw shots and a noise free TIFF. Make an Alamy JPEG from your TIFF

 

Your Sony camera is doing all of the photoshop work automatically, and then outputting a JPEG. This way you have the option to adjust the RAW images first and then output a noise free TIFF, and also retain all of the noisy RAW files if you want to.

 

Here is an explanation on the Adobe site, but IT IS OUT OF DATE !!!

https://helpx.adobe.com/ca/photoshop/using/image-stacks.html
 

 

Thanks for the suggestion. I think it was our old friend Philippe (might be mistaken) who suggested in another place (i.e. not this forum) that the RX100 worked well in night mode and I remember he included some examples (one was definitely inside The Natural History Museum in London) (I can't find his post though). Your suggestion also sounds intriguing... just down to whether I can hold the camera still enough (I don't have the steadiest hand) to make it work.

 

In the case of the images I took that night, it was midnight, cold and I intended from the off to upload as Live News pertaining to the weather so speed was of the essence and hence creating an in-camera JPEG worked for me. What I might well do is find another night when I have no time pressures to go out and take some shots to try out both methods to decide which works best for me. Where speed is less urgent, I would be inclined to take my Nikon and a tripod and just go with slow shutter speeds.  But I guess there are times when I don't have my tripod with me so worth having a no-tripod 'plan B' for such low-light moments.

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