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Hi all, having recently returned to photography after a few years sabbatical I’ve bought myself a Leica which shoots DNG files ( which I know are RAW files)! I’ve started loadin* up more photos to my profile and today found some pictures I captured on my Canon DSLR years ago however they are TIFF files. 
 

After finding the upload app didn’t like this format it left me wondering why?

also after I edited some of my new JPEGs from my Leica using Lightroom these were also rejected by the Alamy uploader?

 

so I’m a little confused as to what I can and why upload?

 

please help me understand?

 

thanks, Lee.

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Lee, it has to be jpegs for Alamy, nothing wrong with tiffs as an archiving format (though RAW files like your Leica's .DNG are better) but high quality jpegs are the order of the day for uploading to Alamy. Depending upon what program you are using to export your jpegs you'll find that there will be a 'quality' setting that governs how much your jpegs are compressed. Alamy say the highest quality but in practice you can go back a notch or two without any visible deterioration at 100% / pixel level for most images but it's best to do your own tests to get a feel for how jpegs can deteriorate as higher compression levels are chosen. It's a trade off between quality and file size so by all means stick to maximum quality for now.

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1 minute ago, Harry Harrison said:

Lee, it has to be jpegs for Alamy, nothing wrong with tiffs as an archiving format (though RAW files like your Leica's .DNG are better) but high quality jpegs are the order of the day for uploading to Alamy. Depending upon what program you are using to export your jpegs you'll find that there will be a 'quality' setting that governs how much your jpegs are compressed. Alamy say the highest quality but in practice you can go back a notch or two without any visible deterioration at 100% / pixel level for most images but it's best to do your own tests to get a feel for how jpegs can deteriorate as higher compression levels are chosen. It's a trade off between quality and file size so by all means stick to maximum quality for now.

Makes perfect Sense, thanks Harry. So I’m safe just sticking m6 Leica in the highest JPEG quality mode !

 

although I do recall many years ago when I first submitted images to Alamy back in 2008 I had to send them on a CD due to there size but they were all taken frommTIFFs.

 

Lee.

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14 minutes ago, Lee Tubb said:

So I’m safe just sticking m6 Leica in the highest JPEG quality mode !

 

Better still shoot in RAW (DNG on your Leica?) and then convert to jpg later using a decent RAW convertor like Lightroom or Photoshop ACR. Then you'll will find amazing capability to correct exposure, white balance etc. during the conversion process.

 

Mark

 

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1 hour ago, Lee Tubb said:

So I’m safe just sticking m6 Leica in the highest JPEG quality mode !

Yes, +1 for Mark's advice. Once you've got the right software you'll be able to see for yourself, your camera jpegs may well be of good quality, and yes, some people do just shoot jpegs for Alamy I'm sure, especially News, but shooting RAW gives you far more options with respect to exposure, highlight and shadow recovery and white balance. Perhaps set your camera to shoot RAW + Jpeg to begin with so you can see.

 

Appropriate typo - the Leica M6 is a great camera, but for film - not for jpegs!

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