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I think I need to speak up here for the health care in the USA. I've never made much money but gave priority to buying health insurance and I had good coverage when I had cancer. It still cost me some of my savings, of course, but I am not broke. If I had had less money in my savings I could have had help from charities. I had two brothers (sorry they are gone) who never bought any insurance and were given care at tax-payer expense when they had serious illnesses. The wonderful doctors I had at Sloan-Kettering spent one day a week in their clinic caring for low-income patients. Of course it is far from perfect but there is actually quite a lot of "socialized medicine" here. And a lot of help from voluntary contributions to charities. It sounds like Gennadii thought the care he would have gotten from the state would not have been the best so he's looking to fund something better. Should have kept my mouth shut about this, I suppose, but I have seen quite a lot of good care given to people without funds here.

 

Paulette

Edited by NYCat
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1 hour ago, NYCat said:

I think I need to speak up here for the health care in the USA. I've never made much money but gave priority to buying health insurance and I had good coverage when I had cancer. It still cost me some of my savings, of course, but I am not broke. If I had had less money in my savings I could have had help from charities. I had two brothers (sorry they are gone) who never bought any insurance and were given care at tax-payer expense when they had serious illnesses. The wonderful doctors I had at Sloan-Kettering spent one day a week in their clinic caring for low-income patients. Of course it is far from perfect but there is actually quite a lot of "socialized medicine" here. And a lot of help from voluntary contributions to charities. It sounds like Gennadii thought the care he would have gotten from the state would not have been the best so he's looking to fund something better. Should have kept my mouth shut about this, I suppose, but I have seen quite a lot of good care given to people without funds here.

 

Paulette

 

But, according to Forbes magazine, medical expenses remains to be the number one cause of personal bankruptcies in the U.S.   

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3 hours ago, JeffGreenberg said:

>> Doesn't Russia have free healthcare provided by the state?

>> Of course, but it seems safer to make my problems paid.

=====

Please explain, if willing.

Safer = better quality care?

But if cancer is spreading & time is critical,

isn't any reasonable care better than no care?

 

What about searching for "clinical trials"?

Some may NOT involve placebos.

Contact university medical schools in your region.

 

As to raising money, in addition to other advice given here,

what about a blog in as many languages as possible with

ability for readers to make very small donations?

Google Translate allows one to offer same blog in dozens of

languages via free blog sites such as WordPress, etc.

I would translate to EVERY language Google offers,

then open blog account for each language...

 

As to blog, IMO, making it at least a little hopeful is better

than title of this thread "no hope left"...?

Something like "My Daily Struggle to Beat My Cancer"

It is important to post new entry to blog EVERY day, IMO,

even if just a couple-few paragraphs per day.

 

I have no idea how to promote blogs or boost blog SEO.

 

About US healthcare, I paid $268/mo PPO via spouse plan,

in 2012 ruptured L4-5 disk in Mendoza ARG thinking it was

pulled muscle or tendon, ended up in Montevideo hospital

5 days later.  Total bill $9K, all refunded by PPO since it was

all provable emergency.  In other words, NO COMPLAINTS.

 

Thanks for the information, but I'm not trying to raise money, I've never had to do this.
I'm only trying to earn in addition to a small pension, and about paying or not paying operations, I think it's safer when paid, although the state does on medical insurance

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My sister died of kidney disease 5 years ago.  She was on dialysis for 5 years then my other sister donated a kidney. So kidney transplant.  After 4 years that kidney was rejected, back on dialysis for a couple more years and she had another transplant operation.  Finally he last month was spent in intensive care getting daily dialysis, had 2 operations hoping to save her, but she died in the end.  We were told by the doctor that her final month's hospital bill (if she or her hubby had to pay) would have been over half a million.  Scary.

 

Jill

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13 minutes ago, Jill Morgan said:

My sister died of kidney disease 5 years ago.  She was on dialysis for 5 years then my other sister donated a kidney. So kidney transplant.  After 4 years that kidney was rejected, back on dialysis for a couple more years and she had another transplant operation.  Finally he last month was spent in intensive care getting daily dialysis, had 2 operations hoping to save her, but she died in the end.  We were told by the doctor that her final month's hospital bill (if she or her hubby had to pay) would have been over half a million.  Scary.

 

Jill

Jill, I'm sorry, very difficult situation, my condolences!
And with the sums of accounts it is generally a nightmare.

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45 minutes ago, Gennadii Rybalov said:

Thanks for the information, but I'm not trying to raise money, I've never had to do this.
I'm only trying to earn in addition to a small pension, and about paying or not paying operations, I think it's safer when paid, although the state does on medical insurance

 

I'm sorry to hear that you have safety concerns. I don't know anything about the Russian system. Here in Canada, the only real concern is long waiting times for some operations, especially orthopedic surgeries. I waited one year for my hip replacement. However, the care before, during, and after the operation was excellent. I was even entitled to over two months of free physiotherapy classes after my operation. Actually, the long wait was good because it gave me time to get psychologically and physically prepared for the operation. I realize that cancer is much more urgent.

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31 minutes ago, Jill Morgan said:

My sister died of kidney disease 5 years ago.  She was on dialysis for 5 years then my other sister donated a kidney. So kidney transplant.  After 4 years that kidney was rejected, back on dialysis for a couple more years and she had another transplant operation.  Finally he last month was spent in intensive care getting daily dialysis, had 2 operations hoping to save her, but she died in the end.  We were told by the doctor that her final month's hospital bill (if she or her hubby had to pay) would have been over half a million.  Scary.

 

Jill

 

Scary indeed. That must have been a very distressing time in your life. Thank goodness we have decent -- but not perfect -- universal healthcare in Canada given the unmanageable costs.

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35 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Scary indeed. That must have been a very distressing time in your life. Thank goodness we have decent -- but not perfect -- universal healthcare in Canada given the unmanageable costs.

 

Canada seems similar to the UK, a healthcare system under pressure but thank got free to any resident.

I have had an operation and have to take 5 medications daily, all free.

My wife has had a shoulder replacement after a dislocation from a fall.

IMHO any affluent country should look after their citizens without the need for charity. After all it is the citizens who make a country what it is.

 

 

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21 minutes ago, BobD said:

 

Canada seems similar to the UK, a healthcare system under pressure but thank got free to any resident.

I have had an operation and have to take 5 medications daily, all free.

My wife has had a shoulder replacement after a dislocation from a fall.

IMHO any affluent country should look after their citizens without the need for charity. After all it is the citizens who make a country what it is.

 

 

 

The Canadian system is under huge pressure as well, especially with an ageing population (like me). I think that we're moving toward a hybrid public/private system, which is probably a good thing. Unfortunately, prescription drugs are not usually covered (yet) in Canada outside of hospitals. However, relatively inexpensive generic prescription medications and private extended care plans that cover at least part of drug costs are widely available.

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17 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

The Canadian system is under huge pressure as well, especially with an ageing population (like me). I think that we're moving toward a hybrid public/private system, which is probably a good thing. Unfortunately, prescription drugs are not usually covered (yet) in Canada outside of hospitals. However, relatively inexpensive generic prescription medications and private extended care plans that cover at least part of drug costs are widely available.

 

John, here in Ontario we have the Trillium Plan.  My sister's drugs were astronomical in cost (from $1000 - $3000 month). Based on income, she was only responsible for $1500 per year and Trillium paid the rest.

 

Jill

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There is an old time saying I’ve heard all of my life. “He/she/they didn’t have a pot to p*** in or a window to throw it out of.”

Now that is poor.

About the time I was expecting our 3rd child, we were close to that. Hubby had just taken a new job at a huge pay cut, but better prospects down the road if we could hang in there. Beans and potatoes were all we could afford to eat.

 

We never went without medical care. You went to a doctor and you paid what you could each month. Sometimes, with me, it was $3-5 a month. 

What’s bad is that after 3 months the company health insurance kicked in, but I didn’t know it, so continued paying from our pocket for years before another employee’s wife clued me in. When anyone presents themself to a hospital emergency room, they cannot be turned away.

In the USA, Medicare is what pensioners’ get. Medicaid is what the indigent of any age get. It’s not perfect, but even with its imperfections, nobody has to wait a year for a needed surgery. The trouble with budget crunches nowadays is that some Medicaid has been cut to some. But there are still Emergency rooms. Plus there are groups of volunteer medical people providing free clinics for vision, dental, general health screenings, etc. like Paulette said.

There is a reason people come to the U.S. from around the world for treatment from cutting edge doctors who are up on the latest and best treatments. Seems every time I turn around there is a story about some deformed (many from injuries) third-world child being flown over and given life-changing free surgery in the U.S. by some of the best doctors in the country.

So, I say nothing is perfect. Anywhere.

Betty

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2 hours ago, Jill Morgan said:

 

John, here in Ontario we have the Trillium Plan.  My sister's drugs were astronomical in cost (from $1000 - $3000 month). Based on income, she was only responsible for $1500 per year and Trillium paid the rest.

 

Jill

 

Interesting. I hadn't heard about Trillium. No such plan that I'm aware of in BC, although I'm currently lucky enough to have 75% of prescription drug costs (after an annual deductible) plus a lot of other extra stuff covered through a private extended care plan that costs very little.

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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

There is an old time saying I’ve heard all of my life. “He/she/they didn’t have a pot to p*** in or a window to throw it out of.”

Now that is poor.

About the time I was expecting our 3rd child, we were close to that. Hubby had just taken a new job at a huge pay cut, but better prospects down the road if we could hang in there. Beans and potatoes were all we could afford to eat.

 

We never went without medical care. You went to a doctor and you paid what you could each month. Sometimes, with me, it was $3-5 a month. 

What’s bad is that after 3 months the company health insurance kicked in, but I didn’t know it, so continued paying from our pocket for years before another employee’s wife clued me in. When anyone presents themself to a hospital emergency room, they cannot be turned away.

In the USA, Medicare is what pensioners’ get. Medicaid is what the indigent of any age get. It’s not perfect, but even with its imperfections, nobody has to wait a year for a needed surgery. The trouble with budget crunches nowadays is that some Medicaid has been cut to some. But there are still Emergency rooms. Plus there are groups of volunteer medical people providing free clinics for vision, dental, general health screenings, etc. like Paulette said.

There is a reason people come to the U.S. from around the world for treatment from cutting edge doctors who are up on the latest and best treatments. Seems every time I turn around there is a story about some deformed (many from injuries) third-world child being flown over and given life-changing free surgery in the U.S. by some of the best doctors in the country.

So, I say nothing is perfect. Anywhere.

Betty

 

And doctors even used to make house calls once upon a time,  which they probably didn't get paid for much of the time.

 

I looked up Medicare and Medicaid. Seems I had them mixed up. Thanks.

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1 hour ago, John Mitchell said:

 

And doctors even used to make house calls once upon a time,  which they probably didn't get paid for much of the time.

 

I looked up Medicare and Medicaid. Seems I had them mixed up. Thanks.

Yes they did. The doctor who delivered my last two was buried Thursday. I remember when my newborn son suddenly choked and quit breathing. I turned him upside down and eased my finger down his throat to dislodge mucus. I called the doctor because my son’s breathing was still off. 

The doctor came, and checked the baby who was breathing fine by then. But I was trembling like a spastic. Doc sat on our sofa and visited, eyeing me until he felt I was ok and calm. He made house calls with his patients until he retired 5 years ago. Gave pain shots, wrote prescriptions, listened to hearts, you name it. 

If a patient was hysterical because a husband or wife suddenly died, he was there, giving a shot to ease their emotional pain. His funeral was very inspiring, the people telling stories in tribute wonderful.

You know? Thinking back, I don’t think he ever charged me for that house call. I assume he thought it came with the one charge for prenatal, delivery, and 6 weeks checkup for both of us.

Betty

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On 7/27/2018 at 18:07, Michael Ventura said:

 

Maybe not dead but good chance of being broke (in the bank).

Homeless, other health issues and this climate...pretty sure it would be death. Our system isn't perfect...part of the reason I have chronic pain now is because I had to wait for my surgeries, I have alot of out of pocket costs for things that are not covered by the government funded system or my supplementary medical through work...but it's still better then trying to undergo any kind of medical treatment and not have the added stress of having to pay for it.

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7 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

The Canadian system is under huge pressure as well, especially with an ageing population (like me). I think that we're moving toward a hybrid public/private system, which is probably a good thing. Unfortunately, prescription drugs are not usually covered (yet) in Canada outside of hospitals. However, relatively inexpensive generic prescription medications and private extended care plans that cover at least part of drug costs are widely available.

Swedish system is free and under pressure as well. Fortunately we have a time limit for most operations which means that if the state/council hasn't seen to you within 3/6 months you get sent to private hospital on their dime. Happened to my wife with her reconstructive knee surgery.

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13 hours ago, JeffGreenberg said:

 

Is it?

Higher tax rates...?

VAT taxes...Not in US.

How much a lifetime of VAT?

Higher costs of living vs. US, except major city centers...?

As to cancer, it may not matter, but...

5+ years avoiding processed foods, eating mostly seafood vs. other meats;

It certainly cured years of gastritis.

US food costs not as low as Lisbon or CDMX but as low as:

http://weeklyad.publix.com/Publix/BrowseByPage/Index/?StoreID=2500667&PromotionCode=Publix-180726&PromotionViewMode=1#PageNumber=1

 

I cannot speak for other countries but not as great as you may assume in regards to the UK. It also seems there are great variations within the US itself.

 

https://www.quora.com/Which-country-pays-more-income-tax-the-USA-or-the-UK

 

Of course having a universal healthcare system costs more and it's not perfect by a long shot. I should also point out that my medication is free because I am of retirement age otherwise there is a small charge. You can also get a discount if you are on long term medication.

I thought the last line of the article very apt. 'depends on what you value'.

 

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4 hours ago, BobD said:

I should also point out that my medication is free because I am of retirement age otherwise there is a small charge.

Better still in Scotland: no prescription charges for anyone. :-)

 

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14 hours ago, Martin Carlsson said:

Swedish system is free and under pressure as well. Fortunately we have a time limit for most operations which means that if the state/council hasn't seen to you within 3/6 months you get sent to private hospital on their dime. Happened to my wife with her reconstructive knee surgery.

 

The Australian model makes a lot of sense to me. Their universal healthcare system is complemented and supported in part by private providers -- i.e. it's a hybrid public/private system. I think this arrangement could work well in Canada and help reduce waiting times for a lot of procedures. My hope is that things will evolve in that direction. Fortunately, healthcare in Canada has not become heavily politicized, so good sense rather than ideology still has a chance of prevailing. 

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6 minutes ago, MandyD said:

Knowing what I know now, I would of paid to have it done privately in Vancouver.

 

This seems to contradict what you said earlier. No?

 

"... but it's still better then trying to undergo any kind of medical treatment and not have the added stress of having to pay for it."

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I see that I have touched upon a hot topic for many, I wish everyone good health!
My country has enough good medical care, but in fact it's oppressing the queues, when you have to do something immediately, that's why you have to incur expenses. I'm afraid that as with my small pension, I did not really have to contact someone for support .
Throughout life, never even in my thoughts, this did not arise, but now, when without work, without a source of income, it would not have to resort.
As long as a month is before the second necessary operation, I will look for a way out of the situation.

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3 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

This seems to contradict what you said earlier. No?

 

"... but it's still better then trying to undergo any kind of medical treatment and not have the added stress of having to pay for it."

I didn't even know it was an option until after. And $10K is still a very small price to pay given the damage it has caused, and far far less then I would be subjected to in the US. A friend in the US said I would have likely been looking at $300-$400K there easy for the same thing.

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