JeffGreenberg

started using CC: what new tools (vs. CS6) most useful?!

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Posted (edited)

Using CC first time now.

My CS6 tool usage consisted of Burn, Dodge, Sat-Desat, Content Aware, & sometimes Clone.

What new CC tools might I want to try first?
Just a tool usable on its own without requiring Layers or other complications...

(how do I find it?  what does icon look like?)

Thanks in advance!!!

Edited by JeffGreenberg

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Jeff. it's been so long since I converted over, it's hard to remember what is before or after CS6.

 

Here is a list from Adobe for the history of features in Camera Raw CC:

https://helpx.adobe.com/camera-raw/using/whats-new.html

 

A list of added features for the history of Photoshop CC 

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/whats-new-cc-2016.html

 

One thing you might like is that Camera Raw is now usable as a filter in the filter selections.  I prefer to open images as smart objects and then pop in and out of the actual Camera Raw as the filter does not save any changes you make to the xmp file.

 

I also use a lot of the new graphics tools, which of course you wouldn't use for photography.

 

Jill

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I won the 2007 Guru Award for Photoshop Excellence (Photography category), from Scott Kelby's NAPP, so my input may be a little dated. I do have the current Photoshop CC though. Here are my top 3 tools, that I use all the time:

  • Spot Healing Tool
  • Levels
  • Lightroom Classic

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Posted (edited)

 

Auto option is worth a try as a base point

Exposure

Temperature

Clarity/Vibrance

CA and Lens Correction buttons in ACR

 

Spot Healing Tool/Clone stamp

Straighten

Sometimes - Image...Adjustments.....Shadows/Highlights for shadows mainly

Crop

Edited by geogphotos

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Posted (edited)

My most used:

LIGHTROOM

Use white balance eyedropper on something white, gray or black. If it doesn’t work, use another spot or the slider.

If whites are too bright, take the brightness/and or white slider to the left, usually need to up exposure a bit after.

Contrast maybe to 10, not always. 

Use shadows slider if shadows too dark, but check for noise after.

If no noise, up clarity to 10, sometimes vibrance.

Click on image which brings it to 100% and check for noise, spots and CA.  I think you had a noise formula for CS6, use that. Always click the CA button. If that doesn’t correct, try the manual option and use eyedropper on the color and tweak the sliders.

If you want something other than the default Adobe color, look to the very top of the adjustments panel. I believe there is a small box or lines that has a drop down with color choices.

i pretty much always use the correction that straightens the image.

Open into PS. There is a button under...ahhh...Image or something near at the very top that says “Open into PS (current version)

 

PS

Crop. Use curves sparingly sometimes. This automatically creates a layer and you have to flatten in a drop down. I know where that is but can’t tell you, lol!!!

I know you hate layers but many of the tools automatically create layers in PS which is ok, you just need to flatten after.

The thing is, when a layer is created when you click on a tool, then you adjust brightness/contrast or levels, or curves, you can take a black brush and brush off the adjustment on an area. Say levels caused your whites to be too white, or made your sky a lighter blue, the brush used on those places bring it down to what you had before. I often do that on the skies, too.

If you prefer to not use LR at all, these adjustments are available in PS. I think the straighten tool is better in LR but that’s about it.

Betty

 

 

 

Edited by Betty LaRue
Typo

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Having tried to advise Jeff on this in one way or another on numerous occasions, I am guessing this post on my part is rather futile but you never know. A total change of mindset is required. The most important thing is to realise that everything has changed in recent years as ACR (and Lightroom) have gained an armoury of tools and functions which enable much of the processing to be done on  the raw file ( I assume Jeff is shooting raw) which makes it unnecessary and indeed undesirable to do a lot of things in Photoshop at all. It is just about always better to work on the raw file where possible. And it is not just a quality issue - it is also about expediency as it is possible to work in ACR or Lightroom (better) on multiple files which is not possible in Photoshop thereby saving a lot of time.

 

Not that Photoshop has become redundant or has not advanced, it most certainly has not but the best bits are in the areas that Jeff refuses to touch. My favourite enhancements or new features are the ability to select objects and focus area. These are amazing new features, truly amazing for photographers. Understanding the selection tools in Photoshop is fundamental and given the tools Jeff mentions I am pretty sure that selections are an area he avoids or is possibly unaware of.

 

So to answer the original question, Jeff is probably gaining nothing from his upgrade as he is avoiding using the features that have advanced and is looking at things from a very outdated perspective. To summarise, do most of your work on the raw file whether that be in ACR or Lightroom. And if using Photoshop go way beyond dodging and burning which are fundamentally primitive. 

 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, MDM said:

Not that Photoshop has become redundant or has not advanced, it most certainly has not but the best bits are in the areas that Jeff refuses to touch. My favourite enhancements or new features are the ability to select objects and focus area. These are amazing new features, truly amazing for photographers. Understanding the selection tools in Photoshop is fundamental and given the tools Jeff mentions I am pretty sure that selections are an area he avoids or is possibly unaware of.

 

This is one of my favourite changes.  I use the Select-subject feature a lot for my website work.  Makes it so easy to crop products out of an image.  Usually needs a little tweak here and there, but quite often PS gets it right and I just have to Layer via cut or copy.

 

Jill

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28 minutes ago, Jill Morgan said:

 

This is one of my favourite changes.  I use the Select-subject feature a lot for my website work.  Makes it so easy to crop products out of an image.  Usually needs a little tweak here and there, but quite often PS gets it right and I just have to Layer via cut or copy.

 

Jill

Hmmm. I haven’t used the “select-subject” tool. I will, if I can find it!

MDM, Jill, where is it?  Oh, goody!

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Posted (edited)
40 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Hmmm. I haven’t used the “select-subject” tool. I will, if I can find it!

MDM, Jill, where is it?  Oh, goody!

 

The Select Menu - Select Focus Area and Select Subject. Focus Area has been around for a while and is incredibly useful for selecting skies in landscapes (invert the selection) while Select Subject is pretty new and is amazing for selecting people and animals in portraits among other things. Definitely the best new features in Photoshop CC in the last few years along with the Select and Mask command which really gathers things related to selections into one place I think. 

Edited by MDM

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I'll tip my Yankee cap to Michael and many others for their better PP skills.

 

I've been using LR and PS and the Viveza 2 tool in the Nik Collection that I have in Filters in PS, use that instead of Layers to do details. I do all the basics on the RAW file in LR Classic, convert to a tiff to edit in PS, where I find retouching easier. I save as a jpeg 8-bit and send it to Alamy. Maybe I'm behind the times on this? 

 

My editing point of view is that of a painter: I see what I want to change and then find the tool to make the change. But I work much slower than Jeff, and of course produce much less. 

 

Edo

 

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, MDM said:

 

The Select Menu - Select Focus Area and Select Subject. Focus Area has been around for a while and is incredibly useful for selecting skies in landscapes (invert the selection) while Select Subject is pretty new and is amazing for selecting people and animals in portraits among other things. Definitely the best new features in Photoshop CC in the last few years along with the Select and Mask command which really gathers things related to selections into one place I think. 

Thank you. :D

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20 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Thank you. :D

 

Don't mention it.

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17 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

I'll tip my Yankee cap to Michael and many others for their better PP skills.

 

I've been using LR and PS and the Viveza 2 tool in the Nik Collection that I have in Filters in PS, use that instead of Layers to do details. I do all the basics on the RAW file in LR Classic, convert to a tiff to edit in PS, where I find retouching easier. I save as a jpeg 8-bit and send it to Alamy. Maybe I'm behind the times on this? 

 

My editing point of view is that of a painter: I see what I want to change and then find the tool to make the change. But I work much slower than Jeff, and of course produce much less. 

 

Edo

 

 

 

 

 

That makes two of us then Edo.

 

Allan

 

 

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Posted (edited)
On 6/26/2018 at 14:43, MDM said:

Having tried to advise Jeff on this in one way or another on numerous occasions, I am guessing this post on my part is rather futile but you never know. A total change of mindset is required. The most important thing is to realise that everything has changed in recent years as ACR (and Lightroom) have gained an armoury of tools and functions which enable much of the processing to be done on  the raw file ( I assume Jeff is shooting raw) which makes it unnecessary and indeed undesirable to do a lot of things in Photoshop at all. It is just about always better to work on the raw file where possible. And it is not just a quality issue - it is also about expediency as it is possible to work in ACR or Lightroom (better) on multiple files which is not possible in Photoshop thereby saving a lot of time.

 

Not that Photoshop has become redundant or has not advanced, it most certainly has not but the best bits are in the areas that Jeff refuses to touch. My favourite enhancements or new features are the ability to select objects and focus area. These are amazing new features, truly amazing for photographers. Understanding the selection tools in Photoshop is fundamental and given the tools Jeff mentions I am pretty sure that selections are an area he avoids or is possibly unaware of.

 

So to answer the original question, Jeff is probably gaining nothing from his upgrade as he is avoiding using the features that have advanced and is looking at things from a very outdated perspective. To summarise, do most of your work on the raw file whether that be in ACR or Lightroom. And if using Photoshop go way beyond dodging and burning which are fundamentally primitive. 

 

 

 

 

In Jeff's defence I also prefer Photoshop to LR (NB. I do now have latest CC versions of both). I shoot in RAW and use ACR within PS and am very happy with it. I've been delighted with my recent upgrade from PSE 7 to PS CC as I can now do all my processing in PS (including ACR for RAW conversion) and now hardly rarely use LR at all. My speed of working has improved significantly. No need to import into the LR catalog (that I hate), and I've no need to export to PS. Simples... but then maybe that's just me. :unsure:

 

PS. MDM, did you see my thread on these geology images here? I'd be interested in any comments you might have on the Drift Ice Abrasion theory (see post towards end of thread). Sorry to go off topic.

 

Mark

Edited by M.Chapman

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Posted (edited)

 I use the Select-subject feature a lot

I haven’t used the “select-subject” tool. I will, if I can find it!

(thanks for responses!)

No one answered how to find this tool.

Maybe its not a tool?  Its a procedure???

No change of mindset needed here.

Licensing is the priority, not museum grade images.

More licenses <== tools that cut processing time, create more shooting time

Of course, it don't hurt if overall look of images improves bit by bit, making them more salable...

Adjusting RAWs OK as long as changes are reversible.  Anything irreversible done to 16bitTIFs.

Edited by JeffGreenberg

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44 minutes ago, JeffGreenberg said:

 I use the Select-subject feature a lot

I haven’t used the “select-subject” tool. I will, if I can find it!

(thanks for responses!)

No one answered how to find this tool.

Maybe its not a tool?  Its a procedure???

No change of mindset needed here.

Licensing is the priority, not museum grade images.

More licenses <== tools that cut processing time, create more shooting time

Of course, it don't hurt if overall look of images improves bit by bit, making them more salable...

 

Jeff, In PS in the top menu options you see SELECT.  In the dropdown you will see the choice of Subject.  It picks the main subject out of the image and makes it a selection.  Not always perfect, depending on the image, but does a pretty good job.

 

Jill

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Jill Morgan said:

top menu options you see SELECT.  In the dropdown you will see the choice of Subject.

 

Thanks!

Its QuickSelection Tool on steroids...:lol: :lol: :lol: 

Its not something I'd use, AFAICT.

My QS tool use is limited to turning white clothing into more salable colors.

Also to darken washed out electrically lit signs.

These things are rarely the dominant subject in photo.

Edited by JeffGreenberg

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Posted (edited)

3 2 problems with CC vs. CS6:

 

a. ACR window too big, can't see all choices at once

(can't find way to reduce font size)

b. ACR histogram dark blue color too similar to black background,

can't see it very well whilst trying to shrink clipped tail left edge..

c. ACR seems to offer only AdobeNeutral, not CameraNeutral...?

(I use latter in CS6)

Edited by JeffGreenberg

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(a) solved.

Hoping for help with (b) (c)

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(b) In the ACR histogram there is a blue box on the upper left corner. That is the colour settings to indicate blacks. Click on that blue box and you will get a colour selection tool. Change colour to any colour you want to indicate black, and the blue box will change to your new colour.

Same thing with the red box for whites on the upper right of the histogram

(c) set colour to “as shot” That is Adobe’s camera neutral colour selection for the particular camera you are using. 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Bill Brooks said:

(b) In the ACR histogram there is a blue box on the upper left corner.
(c) set colour to “as shot”

 

Thanks for response!  See my CC2018-ACR control panels below.

I don't see blue box...?  I only see clipped pixel warning triangle...?

(dark blue harder to see in original vs. screen shot below)

 

I always use "as shot" but now in CC2018 there is CameraNeutral warning

about "profile not installed, rendering incorrect" -- yet another message

stated RX10-IV makes lens corrections in-camera...???

 

www.PhotosPhotos.net/CC2018-ACR1.jpg

 

www.PhotosPhotos.net/CC2018-ACR2.jpg

 

WHAT POINT(S) AM I MISSING??!! :wacko: :wacko: :wacko: 

 

 

Edited by JeffGreenberg

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The blue box I referred to has become a clipped pixel warning triangle in the upper right corner of histogram in your CC version. Double click on it to change colour.

Temperature of 5250 tint +1 (Camera Neutral) setting is in the ball park for a Sony chip. USE it anyway

Or you need to install the camera profile if it is available from Adobe. It appears it is not available in your profile browser. Check the Adobe site directly.

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BillB & all,

 

Double clicking on warning triangle or box only turns on-off clipped pixels

in preview image.  It don't offer color changes in histogram AFAICT.

 

5250 color temp was specific to 1 image, not all.

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