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I always upload news images as unedited jpegs straight from camera, before i even have a chance to sit in front of the computer. Thinking behind it was that the sooner i upload the better. However, I look at top selling news images that papers print, and many of them clearly were beautifully edited in terms of contrast, color balance etc.

What is tge best way:

- fast upload but unedited images which dont stand out?

- still fast upload with basic editing on the phone/tabletnto make them look "better than bland"?

- slower upload but edited so that they stand out relally well?

My question i guess here is what is your workflow, and do you find one way generating more sales that the other?

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When you consider what is allowable in a news image, You should be able to edit each in about 30 seconds.. 

- crop.

- levels

- slight curve

- white balance if needed.

 

you are only tweaking the image.

Edited by Julie Edwards
Speling correction

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Don't confuse edits made by the photographer with pre press work by the newspaper. 

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Mostly i send just the jpg from the camera - but remember, you have already, in camera, set your preferences for the jpg in terms of saturation/contrast/white balance etc  - so in a sense you've already done an edit..


If you think your images are a bit lacking in zing then just look to your in camera settings first

 

Sometimes, because i shoot both raw and jpg, i can do a more detailed raw conversion, again on the back of the camera, if i feel an image needs a bit more work before i ping it out

 

And yes, papers can, and do, boost things again for their own print output

 

km

 

 

 

 

Edited by RedSnapper
typo

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48 minutes ago, Cliff Hide said:

Don't confuse edits made by the photographer with pre press work by the newspaper. 

My lack of knowledge in this field is evident. I did not think about this. Looks like i will stick to in camera conversion settings then.

Thank you.

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I only shoot RAW and editing is really quick. 

 

I edit in ACR in Photoshop: 

  • Check focus.
  • Crop image.
  • Adjust levels.
  • Get rid off chromatic aberration by ticking box.
  • Get rid off obvious dust spots in skies.
  • Save image as JPEG.
  • Once all images have been edited, save them to a new folder and apply captions and keywords as a batch.
  • File to agency.
Edited by vpics

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17 hours ago, vpics said:

I only shoot RAW and editing is really quick. 

 

I edit in ACR in Photoshop: 

  • Check focus.
  • Crop image.
  • Adjust levels.
  • Get rid off chromatic aberration by ticking box.
  • Get rid off obvious dust spots in skies.
  • Save image as JPEG.
  • Once all images have been edited, save them to a new folder and apply captions and keywords as a batch.
  • File to agency.

May I know when do you do this? During an event? Do you take laptop with you and sit somewhere afterwards to edit and upload, or wait until you get home? Isn't this often too late?

 

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I only work from RAW or NEF images.  Years ago I photographed an event

with an old KODAK / NIKON DCS 620, a 2+MP DSLR and had to work at

1600 ISO.  By having the RAW files to work from one of the images from

that event has become my most licensed image.  If I had worked in JPEG

there would not have been much that could have been done with the images.

 

Edit no, adjust and cleanup yes and I save all of my captioned RAW files.

 

Chuck

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