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Jools Elliott

Taking inspiration from Mr Greenberg

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Morning all

 

I went down to the city of Lyon yesterday and apart from being baked in the 34°c sun I found myself getting a couple of shots of the inhabitants.

 

Taking inspiration from Jeff whose work and advice I try to adhere to, I came up with this. I did have huge problems with the light and stability if the image due to it being indoors. I asked the priest if he would pose for me and he willingly agreed :D

 

It's only the top of his hands that are sharp but then at f2.8 and ISO800 it was a bit of a struggle.

 

And the Jeff inspiration came later in the day. I saw a guy playing the accordian and asked if I could take his photos. He agreed for some small change.

 

Any thoughts on the photo and the small change? 

 

Jools

 

9685932792_3932d40d60_b.jpg

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Brilliant - that is a very saleable stock photo ! Can be used full page with copy laid over - and a front cover with room for the title and text. Full of personality and meaning yet anonymous enough to not upset an individual.

Small change - do you mean paying for the shot ? Nothing wrong with that at all !

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Doesn't look like a accordian to me but definately worth some small change - well done.

 

dov

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Brilliant - that is a very saleable stock photo ! Can be used full page with copy laid over - and a front cover with room for the title and text. Full of personality and meaning yet anonymous enough to not upset an individual.

Small change - do you mean paying for the shot ? Nothing wrong with that at all !

 

Thanks Martin, and Dov.

 

Yes, I did mean giving some change for getting the photo of the accordian player. I'm debating on where to send the image above.

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The shot of the priest's hands and beads is an inspirational stock photo (no religious pun intended). The shallow depth of field works for the image, not against it. Alamy QC understands DoF. 

 

I don't see any guy playing a whatsit? Tip for posing? Why not? Well, the only "why not" I can think of is, with our present prices, the "model" may make more than we will. 

 

Can I ask you, Jools, and everyone in the forum, when posting an image for comment please say what camera and lens is being used and any other equipment details. 

 

Edo

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Thanks Ed :D

 

Camera details: Canon 5D Mark II; Canon 28-70L f2.8 (not a typo, it's the original version) plus tripod due to low light. Cable release use to further prevent camera shake. ISO 800 at f2.8.

 

It wasn't easy as I was taking up the priests time. Felt lucky to get what I did but would have preferred the image had a littlr more depth of field.

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I also quite like this picture and think that the composition will give potential buyers lots of leeway into how they could use the image. Also its nice and simple. I have a similar picture but with a dragonfly, I only wish I could have cropped it as close as you did.

Likewise a few coins to a model can't beat that!

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I like the image too, but next time I'd get him to play a larger accordian . . .

 

dd

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I'm just posting again to see my snap of actor George C. Scott on all three forum sections at once.  B)

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I like the picture of the priest's hands; but I think that the Catholic church is probably still doing OK financially, so he probably doesn't need any spare change (just kidding, sort of). About the only time I pay "models" is if I take a photo of street musicians. I figure that they probably need the money as much as I do.

Edited by John Mitchell
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Jools & Jeff? Wasn't that a French film with music by Michel Legrand?

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Not clear why I'm getting mentioned,

unless its about a studio shooter

taking, for first time, real people

doing real things in real places...?

 

Am not seeing any accordian player image.

But great "detail" close-up of priest!

 

Have NEVER(?) paid to take photo, & have never

"snuck" photo if someone demands pay in advance...

Have ALWAYS supplied business card when requested

& have always followed through when individuals  email me

requesting copy of image (personal use only)...

 

I mentioned you Jeff as I'd like to have more guts in doing the kind of thing you. That's why when you recently went to Paris to take photos I was curious as to what you asked people in order to take their images. 

 

Those first words you wrote are something I am trying to do more of "real people doing real things".

 

Do you always give a business card to those whose photo you take? 

 

You weren't seeing the accordian player as I hadn't posted it. However, here he is. Not quite in the same league as the priest though.

 

9691917900_94b61e19a1_o.jpg

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I would pay some of these accordion players to go elsewhere....

 

but a good performer is a pleasure to encounter (have to say that as my wife plays for folk dance group).

 

Generally don't give money for taking photos, typical exception being volunteer charity collectors.

 

Good idea to carry business cards Jeff, I must get organised!

 

Cracking shot of priest BTW.

Edited by Bryan

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my wife plays for folk dance group

 

My ex-wife was in partnership with a guy who operated a barrel organ...

 

Have NEVER(?) paid to take photo, & have never

"snuck" photo if someone demands pay in advance...

Have ALWAYS supplied business card when requested

& have always followed through when individuals  email me

requesting copy of image (personal use only)...

 

Yes, I always try to establish myself as a 'proper' photographer when I meet people. A business card helps, of course, and I try to tell people why I'm shooting. Most people seem happy to be photographed, as opposed to being 'spied on'. This can lead to candid pix 'with permission': ie I've already engaged with them, and, hopefully, they quickly stop being self-conscious and forget I'm there.

 

And an emailed shot of the best pic in a series is a simple way to say "thank you"...

Edited by John Morrison

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Got to agree business cards are a good Idea ( and I always try to keep some with me ) I also give a bit of change to street entertainers / buskers, whether or not I am taking pictures of them as I think it takes a bit of guts to stand on a street corner playing to the public..

 

Like the priest image jools and think that could be a good seller....( might be inclined to watermark it though before someone else  fancies it for a blog or something somewhere ) 

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Thanks all. It seems my image of the priest has really provoked some excellent reactions :D

 

As with regards to the giving of money. I thought it only fair as I have the potential to make some scheckles out of it.

 

I do have another image that I was going to post up here but it hasn't gone live yet.

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Never pay folk money for taking their photo . . . if they say no, then no it is. If they say "yes, for money" then no it is.

 

But buskers . . . I always drop a few bob into their hat, then take their photo(s)--I'm acknowledging their craft, they mine.

 

dd

Edited by dustydingo

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One definition of a gentleman is a man who can play the accordion but chooses not to. 

 

For clarity, I don't tip subjects either; I was just encouraging Jools, If he feels like tipping, that would be okay. In the past, I did a few shoots (South America, Southeast Asia) where the client had a budget for "tipping," but the point was to get them to sign model releases. If you are tipping in the Third World, you will soon find yourself surrounded by people with their hands out. So play it as it lays. 

 

One more observation/comment: Jools, you said that Jeff suggested shooting "real people doing real things," and he did. But your style of shooting and Jeff's are 180 degree apart. (Both are valid, by the way.) Jools, you, even shooting people, are on a tripod; you're still a landscape shooter at heart. Jeff could do fifty or more pictures with his handheld camera and fill-flash, while you're still directing that priest. 

 

I respectfully suggest that you continue to widen your subject selection and learn to work faster and handhold a camera. And where are the food images I suggested you do? You're in France, for godsakes! Look at how many of Jeff's pictures involve food.  :rolleyes: 

Edited by Ed Rooney
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Don't worry Ed, those food pictures are in the back of my head. 

 

This past week is the first time I've been able to properly work again. With my wife and I taking delivery of our son in early June it's not been easy to do what I wanted to do. I've been trying to catch up on things a bit too so that has taken time from what I want to be doing.

 

I suspect it will take another couple of weeks before I can really clear the decks and be in the position I want to be in.

 

And yes, Jeff's style and mine are very different and are poles apart. I didn't have my flash with me and in any case the first image I shot of the priest was in fact hand held. If I do people shots then normally they are done handheld.

 

My subject selection is getting broader but working faster is not necessarily going to work for what it is that I do. But I respectfully take what you say to hand :D

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I hear you, Jools.

 

Like Jeff, I almost always shoot handheld these days, but I do not routinely use fill-flash. I do not want to carry a lighting template to every shot, even though I can see Jeff's point in doing this. Photography has to remain fun for me, so I follow the light when I shoot . . . available light. I'm channeling Cartier-Bresson, but targeting stock subjects. Many of us are not earning enough from stock to make it worthwhile doing anymore. So why do I continue? It gives me something to do. It's as simple as that. Photography earned me a good living for 30-plus years. Now days it doesn't pay for my gear. There it is. 

 

Edo

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Well, I'm hoping to continue improving my sales year on year but getting more and more subjects shot.

 

The one thing that I do find wearing is the getting to and from places. On Thursday, the train went at 0545 from Tours to then arrive in Lyon at 0940. I know it's more comfortable than a plane but it's still as boring as heck. Just try to get in some sleep when I can. 

 

And you mentioned trying more handheld stuff. This is one of mine through another agency but here on Alamy. It's a local bakers and in 2 minutes I think I did around 20 shots. I found the speed at which the guy was working went hand in hand with how many shots were possible.

 

I would like to get more of this kind of stuff when I can. I also have an eye on one of the local markets here where I've seen things when I'm out with the family but need to go back on my own to work un-hindered.

 

D6J9A5.jpg

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One more observation/comment: Jools, you said that Jeff suggested shooting "real people doing real things," and he did. But your style of shooting and Jeff's are 180 degree apart. (Both are valid, by the way.) Jools, you, even shooting people, are on a tripod; you're still a landscape shooter at heart. Jeff could do fifty or more pictures with his handheld camera and fill-flash, while you're still directing that priest. 

 

I respectfully suggest that you continue to widen your subject selection and learn to work faster and handhold a camera. And where are the food images I suggested you do? You're in France, for godsakes! Look at how many of Jeff's pictures involve food.  :rolleyes: 

 

Sage observations, Ed.  Not all of us are born to be great "people photographers." I often photograph people doing things and usually enjoy it, but my best selling photos are seldom "people shots" per se. There are areas that I'm much better at. Also, given the way I work, it would take me several incarnations to amass the number of images that Jeff has on Alamy. Everyone has to find out what works best for him/her IMO. We aren't all cast in the same mould, which is a good thing.

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That's cookin', Jools (metaphoriclly and actually). Good stuff. 

 

May I again point to something obvious that you're missing, Jools? A train ride on the French railways from Tours to Lyon? Is that not a subject for stock? My goodness! Remember I lived in Europe for 16 years. A lot of people are obsessed with trains and train travel. 

Edited by Ed Rooney

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Perhaps it's time to get rid of the term "stock photography." Was never fond of  it myself. "Stock" sounds like something you might find in the soup department or keep piled up in the pantry (when there were such things). Any thoughts on this?

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Perhaps it's time to get rid of the term "stock photography." Was never fond of  it myself. "Stock" sounds like something you might find in the soup department or keep piled up in the pantry (when there were such things). Any thoughts on this?

 

The words that make me queasy are 'royalty' and 'free'... :unsure:

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