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20 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

I see nice dogs everyday, but not that one.

 

FYI:

 

http://edoruan2.blogspot.mx/2018/05/san-miguel-nomad.html  

 

 

I took that picture quite a long time ago, so that perro may have wings now. San Miguel's dogs are probably the luckiest in Mexico. It didn't used to be that way and still isn't in most places.

 

Enjoyed your blog post. Shall stay tuned...

Edited by John Mitchell

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Thanks, John.

 

The only problem with dogs is their lives are too short. A doogie kiss, that light touch of their tongue, helps get me through the day. 

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Ed, I think some Americans started a rescue organization in San Miguel years ago and if you miss your dog walking perhaps you could find them and volunteer.

 

Paulette

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Volunteer? Hmm. 

 

Betty has to walk two African parrots, and one is a man-eater. Those things live as long as sea turtles. Great Danes are lucky to last 6 years. There's no fairness in nature. 

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2 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Volunteer? Hmm. 

 

Betty has to walk two African parrots, and one is a man-eater. Those things live as long as sea turtles. Great Danes are lucky to last 6 years. There's no fairness in nature. 

:lol::D Bogie hasn’t sneaked up on my blind side since we moved.  And I can barely see the scar on my big toe these days.

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You've got 9 more toes Bogie has his eye on.

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On 5/12/2018 at 14:03, NYCat said:

Ed, I think some Americans started a rescue organization in San Miguel years ago and if you miss your dog walking perhaps you could find them and volunteer.

 

Paulette

 

Paulette, I have no idea how long I'll be here, so I can't take on any extra things right now. 

 

The woman who, in another post, I said has a good eye but no digital knowledge, is going on Safari in Africa sometime in the next year. She has an older Nikon SDLR, a D200, and a 70-300mm zoom. Do you think that lens will be long enough out on the veld in Kenya or Tanzania? I've never been on Safari, but I once did a long interview with John Dominis. Since the camera is DX, wouldn't that 300mm become a 450mm? Hmm.

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Yes, she can do very well with that. Even better, of course, if she can get an 80-400 which is what I use most of the time. I have plenty of images I shot with the 70-300 and if she ever gets close to the animals she will prefer that one. Before I started going to see the animals in the wild I liked to shoot everything very close, My first experience was with the beautiful big brown bears in Brooks Falls. I immediate discovered I needed to do "environmental" shots that put the animals in their home (since I didn't want to walk right up to them).. It's a different way of composing and can be wonderful to play around with. Mostly she should always take the time to stop shooting and look and appreciate without the camera in front of her face. Africa is wonderful and I probably won't get back there again so I envy her.

 

Paulette

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Thanks, Paulette -- I'll pass on the focal length information. 

 

I like your wildlife images best, because they show both understanding and compassion.   

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1 hour ago, NYCat said:

 Mostly she should always take the time to stop shooting and look and appreciate without the camera in front of her face.

 

I think this is wise advice for anyone, no matter what type of photography they do. We all know the story about the tourist who was so busy snapping away that he came home without having actually seen anything. It's an easy trap to fall into (ironically).

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4 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Thanks, Paulette -- I'll pass on the focal length information. 

 

I like your wildlife images best, because they show both understanding and compassion.   

 

Thank you. I do love, love, love the animals.

 

Paulette

 

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I've reopened my old blog, Mulberry Street, and I'm posting some general thoughts on San Miguel there:  http://edoruan2.blogspot.mx

 

I'll post again in here with more specific things that are Alamy related. 

 

Yesterday, I tried not to say, "Habra Ingles?" to anyone. Lucky me got a taxi driver who had lived in Texas and spoke better English than I do. My mix of Spanish-Italian-English does not work as well here as it did in the lower half of South America. Spanish and English work better here, and the Italian just makes everything sounds like gobbledygook. Am I too old to learn Spanish? No! Not basic Spanish, anyway. 

 

Edo

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It's alt-168, Ed. ¿

Don't know how you get keypad numbers to work on a laptop, though. Quicker to google, copy and paste most of the time.

Naturally, the blog is great. Good luck.

Edited by spacecadet

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20 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

I've reopened my old blog, Mulberry Street, and I'm posting some general thoughts on San Miguel there:  http://edoruan2.blogspot.mx

 

I'll post again in here with more specific things that are Alamy related. 

 

Yesterday, I tried not to say, "Habra Ingles?" to anyone. Lucky me got a taxi driver who had lived in Texas and spoke better English than I do. My mix of Spanish-Italian-English does not work as well here as it did in the lower half of South America. Spanish and English work better here, and the Italian just makes everything sounds like gobbledygook. Am I too old to learn Spanish? No! Not basic Spanish, anyway. 

 

Edo

 

Lots of good Spanish-language courses available in SMA, as I'm sure you've discovered. I've taken a couple myself over the years. You can also hire a tutor for not a lot of pesos. I've always found Mexicans to be very appreciative of any attempts made to learn Spanish.

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Thanks, Mark.

 

That was a mild joke about the ¿ ? I've been getting some use out of the Google Translator down here. I just explained to the housekeeper the difference between warm and hot and about humidity. The poor woman would die in Saigon. 

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I agree about the people down here, John. Right now, with my unknown and homeless future, I do not have the calmness that's needed to take a class. 

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55 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

I agree about the people down here, John. Right now, with my unknown and homeless future, I do not have the calmness that's needed to take a class. 

 

Understandable. No doubt you're soaking up a lot of new Spanish through osmosis, especially since you speak Italian, which sounds to me like Spanish spoken with more attitude. Hope things are improving on the home (NYC) front.

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Hi Ed,

 

Was wondering how your RX100/3 did in low light inside of La Parroquia?  I am looking for a compact, Alamy suitable camera.   I usually shoot at ISO 3200 with my D5MkIII inside churches and found that to be my limit in terms of balancing noise and shutter speed.   The Sony RX100/x seems to have high marks, overall.

 

For sure San Miguel is a beautiful city.   If you want to take some side trips have a look at historic Queretaro, just 45-60 minutes away.   A very photogenic city as well with its large centro historico.  

 

Scott

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I was raised a Catholic, Scott, and I find it a bit offensive to shoot inside a church while a mass is going on, and so far something was going on whenever I stepped inside La Parroquia. (I'll have to get over that. :rolleyes:)

 

Yesterday, I was teaching the 100/3 to a woman here, and she wandered into a very dark section of Bellas Artes, around the corner. I set the camera up on the Gold Intelligent Auto for her, and I was surprised to see how well it did in an almost totally dark room.

 

Queretaro? I've not ventured too far from the Jardin yet.

 

Edo

Edited by Ed Rooney

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2 hours ago, geogphotos said:

 

 

Sanctuary of Atotonilco and nearby hot springs swimming pools. Not sure why my writing is so big and bold.

 

Ah, is that better, Ian. B)

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On 5/9/2018 at 09:09, Ed Rooney said:

........I've published memoirs -- did my best ones in a weekly spot on BBC Radio Oxford.".....

 

 “And that sweet City with her dreaming spires”

 

Thyrsis by Matthew Arnold.

 

oxford-skyline-at-dawn-A046E3.jpg

Edited by Thyrsis

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Atotonilco does make an interesting side trip, but it's a really sleepy town (which is a good thing, of course).

 

On my last visit, I was reminded of the old saying, "A dog chases a cat in Mexico and they are both walking."

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I'm not ignoring you all, it's just that there has been no change in my basic situation in NYC, and I'm here in San Miguel till the end of June. I'm not sure about where I'll be going next, staying here month by month or . . . somewhere else??? 

 

This small Mexican city remains charming and peaceful. I'm not depressed, but I am stressed about the shape of the future. 

 

I restarted my old blog, and I report on food and lighter subjects there:  http://edoruan2.blogspot.com

 

If anyone wants to get ahold of me, my email is:  edoruan@gmail.com

 

Edo

 

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21 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

I restarted my old blog, and I report on food and lighter subjects there:  http://edoruan2.blogspot.com

 

 

A pleasure to read, and look at, as always.

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