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Marb

Taking shots of a BBC film production.

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We have the BBC in the area making a film using a street as the set. I have been taking pictures (as well as loads of the public on their phones) but as soon as I get my slr out, especially with a large lense I get snotty questions from producers and the like. The extras and folk lower down on the hierarchy were very nice and obliging. I have mainly taken shots of all the props in the street they have dressed and some of the crewe working. I am always polite but when some of the residents did mention that the BBC do seem to think they own the village and are acting very high handed so it wasn't just me.

 

Basicly where do I stand on this submitting to Alamy as I didn't want to get bogged down with model releases. Would it be editorial ? I appreciate any advice as I have never shot a film production before but thought it would be rude not to considering it's on my doorstep. There are no shots that would be considered "spoilers" either.

 

Thanking in advance.

Edited by Marb

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It is fine as editorial.  

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Why not  use it as Live News?

BBC films new series with all these nice friendly actors.

Who wears what. Who is talking to who.

Maybe complete with a content pub owner and upset townspeople.

 

wim

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My understanding is that as long as you are in a public place you are perfectly entitled to photograph the proceedings. Just don't do anything that could be construed as harassment, e.g. aggressively pursuing a particular person, or obstructing the proceedings (and politely ask the snotty producers to mind their own business and to not harass you).

As others advise, your pictures should only be for editorial use unless you have appropriate releases.

What you are doing is a form of street photography and there is online guidance available. Just Google Photographers Rights and you'll find a lot of information setting out the legal position in the UK.

Edited by Dave Richards
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One of the producers  asked me as I was pointing my camera in the direction of the street (from outside the boundary) which is a closed set "have you got permission?" I said "permission for what?"  She said to take photos and asked if I was from the press. I just started to (foolishly) try and pacify her and say I won't be publishing anything to give the story away etc and she started nodding slowly saying ok...right...ok but still making me feel like c**p. 

Edited by Marb

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I've just uploaded to Live News images taken at a local funeral this morning. It's the first time I've ventured to do this and I approached it with a great deal of trepidation, but having spoken to a number of the people there they were quite happy for me to cover it. Shortly after I'd received this reassurance a local press photographer who I meet frequently arrived and he told me that he goes there quite often to cover funerals with no issues. It's very easy to feel intimidated in situations where we don't have prior experience, but we know these types of images get taken because we see them in the press - so somebody took them, and that might as well be you or I!

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I seem to have lost my confidence photographing people as I don't really socialise (working alone at home). As a student 30 years ago I was doing all kinds of environmental portraiture in the streets and confidently approaching people. I think I prefer landscape photography but I do need to get back into this. I also am finding a Nikon D750 with prime lenses is not practical and changing lenses usually loses me a good shot. Perhaps a small compact with wide to zoom lens would be best for journalistic work but the lens quality will not be as good.

Edited by Marb

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Yes, these movie/TV folks can be quite touchy about photos on a set, even if in a public area.  Years ago, I heard that a movie was being filmed in Washington, DC (as many are....at least parts are) and they closed a major bridge over the Potomac River for a chase scene, just for the early morning on a Sunday.  Well I had access to a office looking right on to the bridge.  From that office view, they could not do anything but when I wandered out on the bridge with my camera in hand, they asked me to leave, saying they "owned" the bridge for that morning and had the right to make me leave.  I did get some rather close shots of the star, Tea Leoni, before being told to leave.  On the other hand, I was in L.A. a few years ago with my then teenage kids and we stumbled on a city set of NCIS: Los Angeles, and they were super kind to the fans and bystanders.  My kids (and I) were excited to see L.L. Cool J (one of the stars of that show).  I was talking to the sound engineer and he said that Mr Cool J was super nice and suggested for us to go to him between takes and take photos with him.  L.L. was very Cool about it.  He put his arms around both kids and I snapped a few pics with my DSLR Nikon, no problems at all.  So I guess it really depends on the set and the people running the show.

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I had this once in London when a Bollywood movie was being filmed. Several unpleasant employees made it clear that the company didn't want photos taken, but when I made clear I knew what the legal position was, they admitted that they had no right to stop me and just went to great lengths to get in the way of my photos.

(Actually, as I was in Trafalgar Square at the time, there are restrictions on commercial photography, but that's up to the local authorities to enforce, not the film crew.)

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It is always best to get permission from the producer, many times they will be more than happy to allow you on the set to get photos, either as they are filming, or between takes.

 

But I know here in Quebec, some actors don't want photos taking of them from so-called 3rd party photographers, also on occasions producers don't want to public to see before hand any scenes in case their plot is inadvertently leaked. 

 

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3 minutes ago, phomme said:

It is always best to get permission from the producer, many times they will be more than happy to allow you on the set to get photos, either as they are filming, or between takes.

 

But I know here in Quebec, some actors don't want photos taking of them from so-called 3rd party photographers, also on occasions producers don't want to public to see before hand any scenes in case their plot is inadvertently leaked. 

 

In the UK, they have no power to prevent photographs being taken in public. If they want privacy, they should use a backlot.

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1 hour ago, spacecadet said:

In the UK, they have no power to prevent photographs being taken in public. If they want privacy, they should use a backlot.

 

doesnt the same also apply for people such as police / fire etc, in the course of their normal business, as long as they are public location too?

 

ive read some horror stories about the terrorism act being used by police with some friends of mine, i stand on the, no they are wrong if its in public its fair game side of the coin. they have been subdued though, through fear of prosecution.

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I posted them into the live news feed earlier today and status is live but they don't come up in the searches.

Edited by Marb

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There are lots of bullies in the film & TV industry at every level. And then the are a whole bunch who are just fine. As ever, you have to assess each situation and play it by ear

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4 hours ago, Avpics said:

I've just uploaded to Live News images taken at a local funeral this morning. It's the first time I've ventured to do this and I approached it with a great deal of trepidation, but having spoken to a number of the people there they were quite happy for me to cover it. Shortly after I'd received this reassurance a local press photographer who I meet frequently arrived and he told me that he goes there quite often to cover funerals with no issues. It's very easy to feel intimidated in situations where we don't have prior experience, but we know these types of images get taken because we see them in the press - so somebody took them, and that might as well be you or I!

 

I saw those pics on the Live News Feed - you covered a sad story very well and were respectful.  Well done!

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16 minutes ago, Colblimp said:

 

I saw those pics on the Live News Feed - you covered a sad story very well and were respectful.  Well done!

That's kind of you to say, thank you

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45 minutes ago, funkyworm said:

 

 

For two days they are on the feed, thereafter they go to regular stock. Otherwise buyers could maybe get them cheaper.

 

BTW they tweeted one of your images... a rare honour only bequeathed on the most worthy.

Really ? wow. Glad I took some then :-)

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2 hours ago, Marb said:

I posted them into the live news feed earlier today and status is live but they don't come up in the searches.

They come up if you search in Live News (assuming those are the ones dated 9 April?)

 

(Edit: Posted at the same time as your replies)

Edited by Avpics

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Nicely done, hope someone picks them up.

They've got an HDR/ 100 clarity sort of look which I'm quite envious of.

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I have  found problems with photographing TV filming.  On one occasion a few months ago they sent a runner to stand in front of me so I could not get shots and it became a rather amusing cat and mouse game as to who could move faster......  

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51 minutes ago, funkyworm said:

 

 

For two days they are on the feed, thereafter they go to regular stock. Otherwise buyers could maybe get them cheaper.

 

BTW they tweeted one of your images... a rare honour only bequeathed on the most worthy.

Thanks. I just edited in Lightroom and pulled up the shadows as it was a very contrasty day. Just a D750.

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3 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

Nicely done, hope someone picks them up.

They've got an HDR/ 100 clarity sort of look which I'm quite envious of.

Thanks. I just edited in Lightroom and pulled up the shadows as it was a very contrasty day. Just a D750.

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