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Interesting.  4 x Panasonic Eneloop 2450 - £15.95 on Amazon UK.  4 x Ikea Ladda 2450 - £5.50

 

Looks like I might be having a trip myself.  Not today though - I don't do Ikea at weekends... :)

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1 hour ago, Vincent Lowe said:

Interesting.  4 x Panasonic Eneloop 2450 - £15.95 on Amazon UK.  4 x Ikea Ladda 2450 - £5.50

 

Looks like I might be having a trip myself.  Not today though - I don't do Ikea at weekends... :)

 

You are right although I get a headache in Ikea no matter what day of a week it is so i may as well sneak in today before people realize what a bargain it is haha 

 

but jokes on side - yeah it does look solid and at that price i`ll be getting few extra packs... 

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Same pack in the Danish IKEAs £5.84 and in the Swedish £5.82. It seems to be the regular price. In the Danish price the 25% Danish VAT is included (same in Sweden for these goods). Not queueing up though. Battery USB charger and 4 batteries (seems to be 1000, though) £5.25. And you also learn a Swedish word for charge (and a lot of other doings) :) - Thought it would be cheaper in Sweden, however, as the r.o.e. is 75.13 in our favour.

Edited by Niels Quist

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May well be a bargain, but some of what I like about the Eneloop cells is their ability to hold charge over a long period and to remain in good nick for several years. Clearly the testing cannot easily replicate this.

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Oh great.

This will force Panasonic to look for free stock photography.

Circle of Life...

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On 2/17/2018 at 20:41, Bryan said:

May well be a bargain, but some of what I like about the Eneloop cells is their ability to hold charge over a long period and to remain in good nick for several years. Clearly the testing cannot easily replicate this.

 

Have to agree ............... but prepared to take a gamble on a couple of packs and see!

 

 

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On 2/17/2018 at 20:41, Bryan said:

May well be a bargain, but some of what I like about the Eneloop cells is their ability to hold charge over a long period and to remain in good nick for several years. Clearly the testing cannot easily replicate this.

 

27 minutes ago, Vincent Lowe said:

 

so it is very possible (looking at those tests) that the ikea`s could actually be a winner here... interesting! thanks for the link Vincent!  

 

 

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I liked the idea of the Eneloop, they do keep their charge well, but are useless in my wife's little Canon SureShot which she uses to great effect for photographing her paintings. Freshly recharged AAs are refused after just a few shots or sometimes they are recognised as needing changing immediately. The only ones which work are the non-rechargeable Energiser Lithium which we buy from Battery Station in the UK. They are a premium price but they do work. There is a high street electronics supplier who I had better not name who sell a slightly cheaper disposable Lithium pack, but we have found them not very reliable. The Ikea AA alkaline cells are a bargain and Jane picks some up when she visits that dreaded shop (but each to their own), but I prefer to buy packs of industrial Duracells which work out a little more but are delivered in bulk with little or no delivery charges. I dislike the practice of disposable batteries but do take care not to let them make their way into our black bins (non-recyclable).

 

We only use the expensive Lithium batteries for the digital camera which has such a high demand; in fact the LED continuous lights specifically advise against them suggesting possible overheating might be an issue

 

Buy a Battery looks a little cheaper for the packs but a little more for shipping, as ever, you have to do your sums if you want the absolute best buy

Edited by Robert M Estall
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I've gone over to Energizer rechargables, which got the highest rating in a recent Which? survey.  But as Bryan pointed out, it's hard to know if you've made the right decision until they've been in use for a while.  So far so good though.  I've been concerned for a long time about disposing of spent batteries, especially in countries where there is less awareness of the hazards involved.

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Thanks for this! This thread came in very handy for me : ++++1000! 

My current Eneloop and others batteries are all slowly dying after four years, so I was about to buying new rechargeables.

In need of five sets of four, for the flashes, and two sets of six for the battery grips, which get used as backup when I am outside, this develops into quite an investment. 

 

I read it is recommended to always keep the sets together, so I give each set a unique number with a sharpie (actually the German Edding equivalent), to not  not mix  them up. 

Reason is that mixing batteries of different ages or with different numbers of reload cycles leads to them breaking earlier.

Once one Batterie of a set dies, I use the remaining ones in the household for flashlights, clocks and the like.  

 

At this price the Ikea batteries are definitely worth a shot-  with savings >100€ for the 8 sets to purchase. (Ikea €6,49 vs. Eneloop €19,99 for a set of four).

Looks like I will be going to Ikea soon :)  

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Someone on PP said they'd pay the extra not to have to go to Ikea. I'm with him.

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24 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

Someone on PP said they'd pay the extra not to have to go to Ikea. I'm with him.

Think I am generally with that,  I h8 Ikea - but savings of 100€+ for essentially the same product lets me forget that for a glimpse of a  moment ;). 

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Perhaps they're not so grim in Germany. You're more polite.

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I don't think I would make the hour+ drive to Ikea just for batteries, not even if a plateful of meatballs was offered as an incentive. I have to admit they have made at least one improvement: they do show you short-cuts rather than attempting to capture you for the day. The one in Neasdon used to make it almost impossible to find the way out, with their stairs to the lower level well hidden. Once I was just there on a recky and exited by running down the up escalator next to the kiddy play area. I'm surprised I wasn't pounced on by yellow shirted heavies! 

 

but credit where credit is due: I wouldn't buy a bed anywhere else

Edited by Robert M Estall

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This book is very funny....  https://www.amazon.com/Horrorstor-Novel-Grady-Hendrix/dp/1594745269  It is a horror story in Ikea in which the torture instruments are explained in much the same way Ikea explains furniture and, of course, there is some difficulty finding a way OUT.

 

Paulette

Edited by NYCat

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23 minutes ago, NYCat said:

This book is very funny....  https://www.amazon.com/Horrorstor-Novel-Grady-Hendrix/dp/1594745269  It is a horror story in Ikea in which the torture instruments are explained in much the same way Ikea explains furniture and, of course, there is some difficulty finding a way OUT.

 

Paulette

 

- and probably with very confusing assembly instructions and a few missing screws and nuts. ;)

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1 hour ago, Niels Quist said:

- and probably with very confusing assembly instructions and a few missing screws and nuts

Shouldn't that have been thumbscrews and nuts?

 

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30 minutes ago, John Richmond said:

Shouldn't that have been thumbscrews and nuts?

 

 

Of course, thanks for the improvement. :)

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It's amazing how many brands and models within brands are out there. Many are likely to just be re-branding of the same product as was the point of this thread.

 

Basically, the rechargeable put out 1.2 volts and the disposable put out 1.5 volts It makes a difference to some types of equipment, to some it is critical. The only flash to address this to my recollection was the hammerhead from Metz used so often by the press which had a space for a fifth cell to bring the combined voltage back up to 6 volts. The actual voltage differs a little from those figures as does the amperage. Domestic things like torches (flashlights to N.Americans) are pretty tolerant and will run happily on cells which our digital gear reckon is knackered.  At least ruptured/leaking cells is pretty infrequent these days, but I still worry about things like that spare emergency torch in the glove-box being a mess when the time finally comes and I haven't checked it often enough. Thankfully, our digital cameras almost exclusively have batteries specific to our models and keep going. The unit in my Pentax K-5 is several years old and seems pretty well as strong as it ever was. I'm not tempted to buy a generic alternative.

Edited by Robert M Estall

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1 hour ago, Robert M Estall said:

It's amazing how many brands and models within brands are out there. Basically, the rechargeable put out 1.2 volts and the disposable put out 1.5 volts It makes a difference to most types of equipment, to some it is critical. The only flash to address this to my recollection was the hammerhead from Metz used so often by the press which had a space for a fifth cell to bring the combined voltage back up to 6 volts. The actual voltage differs a little from those figures as does the amperage. Domestic things like torches (flashlights to N.Americans) are pretty tolerant and will run happily on cells which our digital gear reckon is knackered.  At least ruptured/leaking cells is pretty infrequent these days, but I still worry about things like that spare emergency torch in the glove-box being a mess when the time finally comes and I haven't checked it often enough. Thankfully, our digital cameras almost exclusively have batteries specific to our models and keep going. The unit in my Pentax K-5 is several years old and seems pretty well as strong as it ever was. I'm not tempted to buy a generic alternative.

 

' .... Domestic things like torches (flashlights to N.Americans) are pretty tolerant and will run happily on cells which our digital gear reckon is knackered ...'   

 

My understanding is that many LED torches - or in my case headlamps - will not be anywhere near as functional with a 1.2-volt battery as 1.5 volt is required to fire the led efficiently - so while happy to use the rechargeable in many pieces of kit I need to good old disposable in my headlamps 

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I'll have to check that out. These newish LED torches seem to last such a long time on a set of batteries! I've got a few of the older older torches and I'm tempted to ditch them just because they suck the juice out of a set of batteries to quickly. 

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1 hour ago, Robert M Estall said:

It's amazing how many brands and models within brands are out there. Basically, the rechargeable put out 1.2 volts and the disposable put out 1.5 volts It makes a difference to most types of equipment, to some it is critical. The only flash to address this to my recollection was the hammerhead from Metz used so often by the press which had a space for a fifth cell to bring the combined voltage back up to 6 volts. The actual voltage differs a little from those figures as does the amperage. Domestic things like torches (flashlights to N.Americans) are pretty tolerant and will run happily on cells which our digital gear reckon is knackered.  At least ruptured/leaking cells is pretty infrequent these days, but I still worry about things like that spare emergency torch in the glove-box being a mess when the time finally comes and I haven't checked it often enough. Thankfully, our digital cameras almost exclusively have batteries specific to our models and keep going. The unit in my Pentax K-5 is several years old and seems pretty well as strong as it ever was. I'm not tempted to buy a generic alternative.

 

Operating a flash with rechargeables is not a problem with newer flashes. 

At least all of  my Canon flashes upward from 430EX work very well with them.

Instruction manual also says that rechargeables can be used. 

 

Even if the performance with rechargeables would be degraded - which frankly I do not experience -  just out of responsibility for the environment I'd be using rechargeables. 

 

Fortunately an Ikea for me is only a 2 minute diversion from my usual route. 

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1 hour ago, Robert M Estall said:

The only flash to address this to my recollection was the hammerhead from Metz used so often by the press which had a space for a fifth cell to bring the combined voltage back up to 6 volts.

1

 

The Nikon SB800 Speedlight has a clip-on adaptor which takes an extra AA cell - rather grandly called a Quick Recycling Battery Pack ....

 

http://www.momentcorp.com/review/sb800.html

 

No problem using rechargeables with this unit or the SB600.

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